UCP National Talks Assistive Tech with Provail

This post was written by UCP Summer 2017 Programs and Development Intern, James O’Connor

 

“We try to ask ourselves: what would make this person’s life better, faster, easier?”

This is what motivates Brenda Chappell, Director of Clinical Services at Provail, a UCP affiliate located in Seattle, Washington. Brenda recently spoke to us about Provail’s assistive technology programs.

[Image Description: A white woman with short brown hair wearing a green sweater and a black scarf holds a smartphone to a book while reading in what appears to be a children’s classroom. She is looking off to the side.] Photo: Lawrence Roffee

 

Assistive technology is an umbrella term that covers equipment, software, system, or any item that is used by people to find and or maintain a job and/or perform activities of daily living. Technology can be big, like an automated lift for van or bath, or small, like a Velcro-attached grip for a fork or a pen. It can be new-age interactive voice activated software for speech therapy or a wheelchair component. It can be high-tech–a computer screen operated by eye movement or low-tech, like a specially-designed door handle for people with muscle strength or dexterity problems.

Assistive technology can often be complex and very user-specific, and this is where Provail’s team plays an important role. At their AT (assistive technology) clinic, they take a holistic approach to finding the best technology for each person.

Brenda and her colleagues’ AT  programs bring professionals from Provail into schools and homes to recommend AT, and teach users, parents, teachers, therapists, and caregivers the best ways to put a person’s AT to best use. Provail works with kids as young as 4 years old, as well as adult clients, and individuals all the way through the lifespan.

Brenda notes that students with earlier access to AT have overwhelmingly better outcomes in both learning and lifestyle. She makes it clear that enabling mobility and communication at an early age are core to the program at Provail. “Before this unique program, we would see adults coming into the clinic with no AT and no mobility. Now, parents doing a 10-week program with us are finding successes that they never knew were possible.”

On top of helping people find and use the best possible AT for their needs, Provail also helps connect users with typical and alternative funding sources, making the stressful process of financing AT easier for many of their clients.

As assistive technology becomes more complex, more varied, and more common, it is important to put people first and keep in mind Brenda’s important question: what would make this person’s life better, faster, easier?
Check out your local affiliate to find out more about what type of AT services may be available, including financial resources that may be available.

#KnowMedicaid

 

As Google search results indicate, many more Americans have grown concerned about losing their (or a family member’s) Medicaid benefit. We at UCP are receiving an increasing number of inquiries about Medicaid and the services and supports it provides for many individuals with disabilities and their families.

 

Even without a pending health care bill in Congress, it can be overwhelming to navigate the process of accessing the funding and benefits necessary to receive the support needed so you or your loved one can live a life without limits. While there is no one way to simplify the process, there are ways to make it a bit easier. The tips and tricks below will help you in your conversations with Medicaid and other agencies.

 

When you’re done checking out our tips, you will also find a PDF guide with the contact information for Medicaid (and related agencies in all 50 states) at the bottom of this post.

 

Keep Records of All Conversations, and Be Sure to Seek Clarification When Necessary:

 

Whenever calling your state or any other entity) regarding services and supports, be sure to keep notes about your conversation including: who you speak with , what department they are in, what department they refer you to, and any other pertinent details.

 

This is really important in the case that there is any confusion or conflicting information during the process , because you will be able to provide past information about what you were told and when.

 

It is also a great idea to ask the person you are speaking to to follow up with an email, if possible; that way you are able to see their summary of the conversation, and open up a dialogue that may help in the future should there be any misunderstandings.

 

Remember That State and Federal Agencies Are Not Identical:

 

When working with Medicaid, or any other government program or agency, it is important to be aware of the difference between the agency in your state, and the federal agencies in Washington, DC.

 

While agencies can be connected, the state agency handles state programs and issues and the federal agency counterpart handles national ones. When getting information about services and supports, it is vital to differentiate between what is available and provided by your state, and what might also be available on the national level.

 

This is also key because these differences affect how programs are funded, and may alter the process required to become eligible. Sometimes programs may be jointly run on the state and national level, but it is still important to be aware of when you’re talking to, or about, your individual state versus when you’re looking at things on a national level.

 

Not All States Run Programs the Same Way, (or a Call Agencies by the Same Name):

 

Another reason it is important to be aware of the difference between state and federal programming is because the way programs, such as Medicaid, are administered can vary significantly from state to state.

 

Therefore, be sure to investigate how things are run in your specific state, and not go off of the experiences of an individual who may live someplace else. A program that is provided through the Department of Health and Human Services in one state may be provided through the Department of Welfare in another.

 

Before getting discouraged and thinking something doesn’t exist, always remember to try a different name or department, because you never know what it might fall under in your state.

 

Always Ask for Other Options:

 

Just because one program, grant, or service is not an option for you, doesn’t mean there isn’t something out there that can help with your situation. Even if you find out that the program you are looking into will not work (or be available) based on for your situation,, be sure to ask the person you’re speaking with if they know of any other programs that may be able to help.

 

When considering your options, it is also important to remember that different programs have different eligibility requirements. So, be sure to provide as much information as possible to determine if you are eligible for a specific program.

 

Obtaining services through Medicaid (or other agencies) is rarely a simple process, but we hope that these tips– as well as our guide of various state offices involved in the administration of services and supports for individuals with disabilities– will make your journey a bit easier.
Do you have any other tips or tricks you would like to add to the list? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter using the hashtag #KnowMedicaid. To learn more about Medicaid in your state, check out our resource guide.

Summer Camp For All

Image Description: A group of campers of all abilities smiling and enjoying their time around the pool.

Image Description: A group of campers of all abilities smiling and enjoying their time around the pool.

We can all fondly remember our summer camp experiences, exploring the outdoors and making memories. Summer camp, a place of adventure, excitement, and growth, is on the agenda for many children with and without disabilities this summer, and there are a multitude of options when it comes to choosing the perfect camp for you or your child.

United Cerebral Palsy’s affiliates around the country offer many different summer camp experiences. United Cerebral Palsy of Mobile’s Camp Smile, one of a handful of camps open to campers regardless of the severity of their disability or their financial means, is a camp exclusively for individuals with disabilities and their siblings. Glenn Harger, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy of Mobile, notes that Camp Smile “adapts to a child’s needs, instead of asking children to adapt to the camp.” United Cerebral Palsy of Delaware similarly invites children with and without a variety of disabilities to their two stellar day camps, Camp Lenape and Camp Manito. These camps foster friendships and make it possible for siblings to attend the same camp as children with disabilities. The camps, founded on the idea that children with disabilities are kids first, seek to create an inclusive environment for all children.

Image Description: A camper swimming in the pool with the help of a flotation device and two counselors.

Image Description: A camper swimming in the pool with the help of a flotation device and two counselors.

Camps Smile, Lenape, and Manito, in addition to many others, offer accessible grounds, dietary adjustments, and a greater proportion of camp counselors to campers than traditional camps. For example, Camp Smile makes accessibility a priority with its wheelchair accessible pathways, air conditioned log cabins and multi-purpose buildings, as well as an accessible bath house, among other amenities. Many camps across the nation specialize in specific services for children with disabilities. Some camps offer on-site speech and occupational therapy, teach campers how to ride bikes, focus on art therapy, or specialize in helping children succeed academically. Camps Lenape and Manito offer accessible swimming, with in-pool ramps to accommodate campers of all abilities and plenty of volunteers to help.

Perhaps the most notable aspect of camps which focus on disability is the lasting impact they can have on campers. Glenn recalled a young girl, around the age of four, and the evidence of her growth: “She just never smiled. The counselors put her on a horse and she had the biggest grin on her face.” Research supports the notion that children can benefit significantly from summer camps. A 2010 study published in the American Journal of Play found that camps can have positive cognitive, social, and identity effects on campers by combining skill improvement with fun and social activities.

Bill McCool, the Executive Director of United Cerebral Palsy of Delaware, fondly remembers the story of one young camper who had behavioral challenges, but for whom camp had a meaningful impact. The camper returned to UCP of Delaware when he was an adult, completely changed and matured, and applied to be an employee at the camp to help other young children benefit from the summer camp that had changed his life. Moved by this experience, McCool explained: “It means an awful lot when you see your campers become adults and you see who they become, at least in part because of the camp. That’s true for kids with disabilities, children without, and our volunteers. And many of them want to come back here!”

It’s no surprise that campers and volunteers alike look forward to returning to summer camps. At Camp Smile, campers can participate in zip lining, a ropes course, horseback riding, archery, swimming, fishing, and many more fun activities. The camp’s mission? To empower children and adults with disabilities to lead a life without limits.

 

Wondering if there is a UCP camp near you? Below is a partial list of United Cerebral Palsy affiliates that offer camp experiences.

ADAPT Community Network (New York City)

Easter Seals UCP (North Carolina and Virginia)

Stepping Stones Ohio

UCP of Central California

UCP of Central Florida

UCP Central Minnesota

UCP of Delaware

UCP of Greater Hartford

UCP Heartland (Missouri)

UCP of Hudson County (New Jersey)

UCP Land of Lincoln (Illinois)

UCP of MetroBoston

UCP of Mobile

UCP of Sacramento and Northern California

UCP of San Luis Obispo

UCP of Stanislaus and Tuolumne Counties

UCP of Tampa Bay

UCP of the Golden Gate

UCP of the North Bay

UCP of West Alabama

UCP of West Central Wisconsin

 

This post was written by Sara Shemali, Summer 2017 Programs and Development Intern at UCP National.

Family-Centered Programs at UCP of Tampa Bay

 

Inclusionary education, the practice of including children both with and without disabilities in school-related settings, is becoming increasingly common in early education programs across the country.

United Cerebral Palsy’s affiliate in Tampa Bay Florida, UCP of Tampa Bay, is way ahead of the curve. Opened in 1992, their inclusionary childhood development center began as an alternative to institutionalization that gave parents of children with special needs, as well as their siblings, a convenient, structured preschool program.

25 years later, the program has blossomed into a NAC accredited developmental preschool, with a five star quality designation from the Quality Counts for Kids Program, which serves over 150 children each year. In the words of Laura White, the Executive Director of UCP of Tampa Bay, “The value of this program lies in allowing children with special needs and their siblings alike to be in a classroom setting together that builds a sense of mutual understanding and inclusion that leads to better outcomes for everyone.” Laura sees the program as an early preparation for the mainstream school system and a powerful way for young siblings to interact with other siblings as well as other children with unique needs.

In addition to the preschool program, UCP of Tampa Bay offers an inclusionary after-school program in which school aged children with disabilities and their age-appropriate (up to 8 years old) siblings are bused from school to the program, making pick-ups far easier for working parents. The program incorporates educational and occupational, physical, and speech therapies for those with special needs until they reach the age of 21. The facility features a fully accessible playground, with a wheelchair accessible swing, and a specialty decking that makes falls safer and aids accessibility. Laura estimates that, over the years, these inclusionary programs have served over two thousand children and over a thousand families.

 

Two young children in Tampa Bay at a graduation ceremony.

Two young children in Tampa Bay at a graduation ceremony.

 

Special thanks to Laura White, Executive Director of UCP of Tampa Bay.

 

To find out more about UCP of Tampa Bay and their programs, please visit their website at www.ucptampa.org.

 

“Halloween Without Limits” Proves To Be A Real Treat!

During the month of October we asked to see the most creative and fun costumes for children with disabilities, and did you deliver! More than 60 photos featuring costume creations from all over were posted to our Facebook page. Nearly 10 MILLION of you saw photos from the contest on Facebook! With nearly 400,000 votes cast, the winner of Halloween Without Limits “let go” of the completion with over 120,000 votes! Congratulations to our winner, “Olaf and his Snow Cloud” from the movie “Frozen!”

Sandy Hundsrucker Olaf

 

The UCP Staff pick for the “Most Creative Costume” goes to the “Penalty Box!” We collectively thought this costume was so unique and had so many cool touches.

Kimberly Domonkos_HalloweenWithoutLimits

 

We had so many amazing entries that we had to show them off! Some of our honorable mentions go to…

The “Despicable Me” crew:

Wayne Cordova

This adorable “Care Bear”:

Kelly Cunningham_HalloweenWithoutLimits

This awsomely-constructed “Alice and Wonderland”:

Katherine Talbott Alice in Wonderland

Take a look in our photo album for all of the amazing entries!

“Going Solo” gives a voice to single parents raising children with disabilities

This book review was written by one of UCP’s summer interns, Alex Vesey. 

Available through the Woodbine House publishing website for $24.95.

Single parents of children with disabilities face unique challenges. They deal with particular social stigmas as well as the day-to-day balancing act of parenting on one’s own. The book Going Solo by Laura E. Marshak, PH.D., aims to address these issues comprehensively and compassionately. She interviews various solo parents, some who chose to adopt or conceive as single parents and some who became single parents as a result of bereavement or divorce. The parents’ interviews are diverse, candid, and full of the rich details of their lives. After each interview, Dr. Marshak breaks down the “Genius Moments” in this story, to highlight exactly what each parent is doing well and provide advice for other parents. The book is also full of links to websites and information about various organizations that provide support for parents of children with disabilities. 

The opening chapter deals with common challenging emotions for parents, including the grief some parents feel after their child’s diagnosis. The focus, however, is on day-to-day coping and celebrating your child. There are individual chapters for different circumstances including divorce, single fatherhood, bereavement, adoption, conceiving alone, dating as a single parent, military parents dealing with a spouse’s deployment, and parenting an adult child with a disability. The parents in this book come from all walks of life. Many draw strength from religious faith, a recurring theme in several interviews. They seek support from families, friends, support groups, and other parents of children with disabilities. What they do have in common is their commitment to their children, their love and their resolve.  Going Solo puts that love front and center and provides practical advice and resources for other parents in the same position.

*This is a book review. UCP received no compensation, nor is endorsing the above.* 

 

Cleveland Clinic Children’s and UCP of Greater Cleveland Co-Host “Go Baby Go”

Kids, start your engines! Cleveland Clinic Children’s and UCP of Greater Cleveland will kick-off Northeast Ohio’s first Go Baby Go workshop, Saturday, May 16 at UCP of Greater Cleveland.

UCP Cleveland

Cleveland Clinic

National Interstate Insurance will supply equipment to engineer 25 ride-on toy cars designed to put local youngsters with disabilities on the fast track to mobility. Skilled craftsmen will customize cars to the unique personality of each youngster before families count down for the tykes to take the wheel during a special a “drive time” race. Backed by support of more than 100 skilled craftsmen and families, Go Baby Go Cleveland is the largest volunteer event in the organization’s history.

Go Baby Go was created in 2006 by Dr. Cole Galloway – who will attend the event. He is the associate chair of the University of Delaware’s Department of Physical Therapy. The program was created to give children with spina bifida, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other mobility disabilities a chance to socialize, move around more easily and keep up with their siblings and peers.

Studies show that the power of independent mobility supports the development of strong cognitive, social, motor, and language skills in young children.

Go Baby Go Cleveland is presented in partnership with Cleveland Clinic Children’s, Cleveland State University, Health Aid of Ohio, Miller’s, National Seating & Mobility, National Interstate Insurance, Permobil, Replay for Kids, and UCP of Greater Cleveland.

More About Cleveland Clinic Children’s

Cleveland Clinic Children’s is a part of the Cleveland Clinic health system and offers full medical, surgical and rehabilitative care for infants, children and adolescents. Cleveland Clinic Children’s supports 126 acute care beds at Cleveland Clinic’s main campus and 284 pediatric beds system wide; in addition, pediatric services are available at 43 Clinic sites in Northeast Ohio. A staff of more than 300 full-time pediatricians and sub-specialists see 800,000 pediatric visits each year and provide hospital care for 18,000 children per year. Cleveland Clinic Children’s is a non-profit, multi-specialty academic medical center integrating clinical care, research and education. Cleveland Clinic Children’s consistently ranks among the “Best Children’s Hospitals” by U.S.News & World Report. Visit us online at www.clevelandclinic.org/childrens and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/clevelandclinicchildrens.

More About UCP of Greater Cleveland

The mission of UCP of Greater Cleveland is to empower children and adults with disabilities to advance their independence, productivity and inclusion in the community. The not-for-profit organization serves 1,100 children and adults with disabilities from Northeast Ohio and maintains a staff of over 170 employees offering comprehensive Children’s Services and Adult Services. With low administrative costs, 92 cents of every contributed dollar goes directly to the programs and services offered to children and adults. The headquarters of UCP of Greater Cleveland – the Iris S. and Bert L. Wolstein Center – are located at 10011 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, 44106. The agency has two other locations in Westlake and Highland Hills, as well as two group homes and various vocational sites throughout Greater Cleveland. Please visitwww.ucpcleveland.org.

 

Be Part of the Great Bike Giveaway

Great Bike Giveaway BannerDo you remember the freedom you felt, the confidence you gained, the pride you had when you received your first bike? UCP is proud to partner with the Great Bike Giveaway to help give children with disabilities the same feeling you had when that shiny new bike arrived at your home.

For the forth consecutive year Friendship Circle is holding the Great Bike Giveaway, a national contest giving away adaptive bikes to children with special needs. They are partnering with Freedom Concepts, Rifton, Buddy Bike, Ambucs, Triaid,Flaghouse, Mobo Cruisers Strae Sports, the Duet and Strider Bikes to give away adaptive bikes to children and young adults with special needs.

Why The Great Bike Giveaway?

Many children with special needs miss out on the childhood joy of bike riding because their physical or cognitive limitations make riding a bicycle near impossible. The Great Bike Giveaway will give children and young adults with special needs the chance to win an adaptive bike and have the feeling of pride, freedom and confidence that bike riding brings.

How The Contest Works

Adaptive bikes are tailored to a child’s needs. To meet the needs of the recipients in this contest, a separate contest is held for each bike type. The contest starts with two bikes of each type and money is raised to add more bikes as the contest progresses. Last year the Great Bike Giveaway ran eight different contests and gave away a total of 108 bikes! This year Friendship Circle hopes to give away 300 bikes to individuals with special needs.

Each bike page has a space where users can enter the contest. Submit a picture of your child with special needs along with a short explanation of why your child needs an adaptive bike.

From the winner of a Parent:  Judd, received his Rifton tricycle that he won through your bike giveaway. He loves it so much. His first time out with it , he pedaled .75 miles! Everyone at the track had a smile on their faces watching him enjoy his bike. The biggest smile there belonged to him though.

Two Ways to Win

Most Votes One bike in each contest will be given away to the entry with the most nominations. Nominations are received from friends and family clicking the “nominate button” on an entrants submission

Bike Raffle All the remaining bikes will be placed in a drawing. To be eligible for the drawing each submission must be nominated by at least 50 friends and family members.

How You Can Help

Whether you have a child with special needs or not you can help more children with special needs win an adaptive bike.

1. Donate To Add More Bikes

In addition to the bikes that have been sponsored, Individuals have the ability to donate to the Great Bike Giveaway to get more bikes added. Every time the donation meter is filled another bike gets added to the drawing!

2. Share and promote

Let as many people as possible know about the opportunity to win an adaptive bike by sharing the the contest via your social networks and email. You can also check out the resources page for additional tools you can use to share the contest.

Contest Timeline

March 4th 11:59 am

Contest submission deadline, no entries will be accepted after this time.

March 5th

Drawing (Drawing date is tentative and subject to change) Will be held and winners will be announced.

To enter the Great Bike Giveaway visit www.greatbikegiveaway.com For contest rules visit www.friendshipcircle.org/bikes/rules.

A Special Thank You To the Sponsors

Freedom Conceptsstrider logoMobo_Cruiserstraeucp_logo_tagline-1

The Five “P”s for Reducing Holiday Stress

We can’t promise you a stress-free holiday season any more than we can promise you a white Christmas, but there are some common sense tips which can help children with disabilities (and their parents!) make it to the end of the holiday season relatively unscathed. We call them the Five “P”s

Gingerbread CookieWe should stress – no pun intended – that when you mix family gatherings, religious or cultural traditions, crowds, noise, lights and sometimes travel, no one is immune to the stress. It’s not just a child with autism who may become over-stimulated or a child with a physical disability who may be exhausted or frustrated. The annual holiday season “melt-down” is to be expected from children of all types and abilities, and maybe some grown-ups too.

The key is managing expectatons. Knowing what is most likley to cause stress for your child during the holidays and having a plan for that eventuality is the easiest route to minimizing problems.

PREPARING

It starts with preparing both your child and your family for what’s to come. Start early with holiday stories, books and movies to help your child understand what it’s all about. Practice traditions in small doses such as a trial-run at a formal sit down dinner with just the immediate family before you add in aunts, uncles and cousins. Take a trip to church or synagogue and explain what will be different about the ceremonies during the holidays. Play holiday music around the house or experiment with lighting candles if that will be something new for your child.  If your child uses a walker or a wheelchair, practice navigating through Uncle John’s house or whereever you are likely to spend time during the festivities if you can.

PLANNING

Then have a solid plan for when things don’t go as expected. Set up an escape route or a safe space so the child can retreat if things get to be too much. Let your friends and relatives know that this isn’t a big deal and there’s no need to make a fuss if your child needs to take a break. Bring a favorite toy from home, a snack, or an iPad to offer your child when they don’t want to – or can’t – go with the flow. Reassure your child that they can take a break anytime they wish and go over how to do so – maybe even set up a code word so your child can signal you that they are having a hard time without drawing too much attention to themselves.

PARTICIPATION

Make sure there is a way they can participate. Scope out venues and ask about holiday gathering plans ahead of time to find a way for your child to be included in the festivities to whatever extend they feel comfortable. Will they be able to be placed at the same table with everyone during dinner? Will they have a good view of the holiday pageant? Will they be included in games with other children? Figure out how this can happen and prepare any necessary accommodations ahead of time.

PAMPERING

Be sure to have everything necessary for your child to be as comfortable as they would normally be at home. Don’t force outfits that are itchy, or dress shoes that are tight just for the sake of appearances. And, don’t expect them to stay up far later, walk far further or stand or sit far longer than they normally would just because it’s a “special occasion.”

PATIENCE

Don’t rush. And, don’t overbook! Tell your relatives and friends that you expect them to be flexible. If you miss the beginning of services or don’t stay for dessert, that is just a fact of life that isn’t going to ruin anything. For a child with a disability it may take longer to get ready, or to get from one place to another and things will simply have to go at a slower pace. The more relaxed you are about time, the more relaxed your child will be as well.  After all, the season is about so much more than gifts and parties. It’s about celebrating together as a family – a family that includes a child with a disability.

 

Happy Holidays!

 

From an Orphanage in Africa to a Life Without Limits

The McGee family agreed to allow Israel to be the “face” of UCP’s annual #GivingTuesday campaign. On Tuesday, December 2, you can put Black Friday and #CyberMonday behind you and do something selfless for families like the McGees. When you make a gift to UCP on #Giving Tuesday, Network for Good will give us $1 for every $20 donate to help people with disabilities and their families. 

Rebekkah McGee now writes a blog about their family and their adoption story, which you can follow at http://yestoadoption.blogspot.com/.

WhIsraelen Rebekah and Will McGee traveled to Ethiopia to meet their soon-to-be-adopted son Israel over two years ago, they never dreamed they were actually embarking on a completely different type of journey. Adopting internationally, they understood that there may be difficulties since Israel was coming from an institution, but they didn’t know exactly what to expect.

“We were young, we had only been married a year (when we decided to adopt). But we knew we wanted to make adoption a priority. It was important to us,” said Rebekah McGee.

Even at four months old, when they met Israel for the first time in Africa, they could tell that he had some developmental delays, but having never been parents before, the McGee’s didn’t know what that meant for the future.Israel2

In May of 2011, when Israel was seven months old, Rebekah and Will brought him home to the U.S. By the time he was nine months old and not yet rolling over, a church friend recommended the family to United Cerebral Palsy of East Central Alabama for early intervention services.

“We had no idea as new parents,” Rebekah McGee said about Israel’s disability. “But I’ve had 2 ½ years of supportive help with UCP. The team there has made me feel more competent that I had the skills I needed as a mother.”

“When they say it takes a village to raise a child, well, UCP is part of my village,” she said. “They have cried with me on the hard days. Anytime we have needed something, they have helped. They are so much more than just the services they offer.”

The McGees have taken advantages of all of those services from early intervention therapy to the daycare Israel is now enrolled in. And, earlier this year, Israel was featured in UCP of East Central Alabama’s annual fundraising telethon. The McGees recently got more details on how parts of Israel’s brain had been affected and a new diagnosis. Although the UCP team had not worked with a child with that specific diagnosis and Israel was only two months away from aging out of early intervention services, the staff jumped on researching the diagnosis to figure out how to best care for him.

“The reality of having a special needs child is that you see a lot of doctors and specialists,” said Will. “We have had to go through so many specialists to find someone who connects with Israel. It’s so refreshing that at UCP we don’t have to do that. Everyone connects. He has a relationship with everyone there.”

Israel now has a one-year-old sister, Edith, who does not have a disability and the family is thriving. Israel has come a long way thanks to the therapy and services he received. He is not quite talking yet, but walks with some assistance. There were difficult times, but Rebekah is glad UCP set the bar high for him to reach.

“Just the other day,” recalls Rebekah, “I was talking to his UCP service coordinator and she said to me ‘We have never put limits on Israel…and we never will.’”

 

family picture Oct 2014