UCP Expresses Concerns About Graham-Cassidy Legislation



As Members of Congress continue to discuss ways to improve the healthcare system in bipartisan hearings, United Cerebral Palsy expresses concerns about the Graham-Cassidy legislation being considered by some Senate Republicans.


The health care needs of individuals living with cerebral palsy and people with other forms of disability are complex, intensive, and diverse. Providers in the UCP affiliate network bring substantial value to the health care system through their approaches to the care of individuals with disabilities, including by offering important services in partnership with state Medicaid programs. Their innovative service models and practices, research, and use of technology have significantly improved access, community integration, and long-term outcomes for 176,000 clients served nationwide.

Capping and reducing spending for Medicaid, a primary source of funding for disability health services, could compromise needed care such as habilitation and rehabilitation services and also affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to thrive in their communities, including through greater use of long-term services and supports (LTSS). More broadly, such action undermines the innovation in care delivery that ensures that we all live lives without limits. And, this does not sustain the vision that forged United Cerebral Palsy back in 1949 as an organization dedicated to finding better alternatives to institutionalization for children living with cerebral palsy.

In the days ahead, we will be sharing our concerns with Senate offices and hope you will join us in opposing this bill that would impede the ability of our affiliate network to care for people with disabilities. United Cerebral Palsy is a part of major national coalitions focused on the preservation of coverage for individuals with pre-existing conditions, continued coverage for rehabilitative and habilitative services, and protecting Medicaid. In short, we are not alone in our concerns and we will continue to work together to support the needs of individuals with disabilities and the providers who serve them.


Senators need to hear from constituents, and we hope you will tell your story. To learn more about UCP’s public policy work and to get involved, please visit http://ucp.org/what-we-do/public-policy/.

UCP National Talks Assistive Tech with Provail

This post was written by UCP Summer 2017 Programs and Development Intern, James O’Connor

 

“We try to ask ourselves: what would make this person’s life better, faster, easier?”

This is what motivates Brenda Chappell, Director of Clinical Services at Provail, a UCP affiliate located in Seattle, Washington. Brenda recently spoke to us about Provail’s assistive technology programs.

[Image Description: A white woman with short brown hair wearing a green sweater and a black scarf holds a smartphone to a book while reading in what appears to be a children’s classroom. She is looking off to the side.] Photo: Lawrence Roffee

 

Assistive technology is an umbrella term that covers equipment, software, system, or any item that is used by people to find and or maintain a job and/or perform activities of daily living. Technology can be big, like an automated lift for van or bath, or small, like a Velcro-attached grip for a fork or a pen. It can be new-age interactive voice activated software for speech therapy or a wheelchair component. It can be high-tech–a computer screen operated by eye movement or low-tech, like a specially-designed door handle for people with muscle strength or dexterity problems.

Assistive technology can often be complex and very user-specific, and this is where Provail’s team plays an important role. At their AT (assistive technology) clinic, they take a holistic approach to finding the best technology for each person.

Brenda and her colleagues’ AT  programs bring professionals from Provail into schools and homes to recommend AT, and teach users, parents, teachers, therapists, and caregivers the best ways to put a person’s AT to best use. Provail works with kids as young as 4 years old, as well as adult clients, and individuals all the way through the lifespan.

Brenda notes that students with earlier access to AT have overwhelmingly better outcomes in both learning and lifestyle. She makes it clear that enabling mobility and communication at an early age are core to the program at Provail. “Before this unique program, we would see adults coming into the clinic with no AT and no mobility. Now, parents doing a 10-week program with us are finding successes that they never knew were possible.”

On top of helping people find and use the best possible AT for their needs, Provail also helps connect users with typical and alternative funding sources, making the stressful process of financing AT easier for many of their clients.

As assistive technology becomes more complex, more varied, and more common, it is important to put people first and keep in mind Brenda’s important question: what would make this person’s life better, faster, easier?
Check out your local affiliate to find out more about what type of AT services may be available, including financial resources that may be available.

Navigating The Scholarship Landscape

 

A Signpost With Blank Signs Pointing in Many Directions

A Signpost With Blank Signs Pointing in Many Directions

As we have mentioned before, the transition from high-school to college comes with challenges for everyone. Oftentimes, one of the biggest challenges when starting college is figuring out how you are going to is pay for it!

 

With college costs skyrocketing in recent years, scholarships are becoming more and more important for college applicants. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2012 the average student at a 4-year institution received $9,740 in scholarship and grant money. This is a quick guide to help students with disabilities navigate the often complex world of scholarships.

 

Finding A Scholarship

 

It’s important to understand the three biggest categories of scholarships: Merit-Based, Need-Based, and what I will call “other.”

 

Merit-Based scholarships award students based on academic, artistic, athletic, and really every imaginable type of achievement.

 

Need-Based scholarships attempt to identify individuals, through the FAFSA form, who need help paying for college. These scholarships are often provided by the college itself, or through the government.

 

The third category, what I referred to as “other,” contains scholarships that you could win for essentially every imaginable reason. Many of these scholarships are essentially an essay contest. There are scholarships for women, people of color, people with disabilities, people who play the drumset, and yes, even people who are really into daydreaming about the zombie apocalypse.

 

There are literally millions of scholarships out there, and a seemingly equally high number of services on the web dedicated to helping you find the right ones for your situation. Luckily for you, I spent some time sorting through those services. I narrowed them down to the three listed below.

 

Here is a list of three free, reputable scholarship search engines:

  • https://www.petersons.com/
    • Peterson’s has over 5000 scholarship providers, 1.5 million scholarships, and $10 billion in scholarships on their site.
    • As well as a scholarship reference, Peterson’s has great resources for finding the ideal university, as well as standardized test prep.
    • Their site is relatively easy to navigate and allows users to search scholarships by keyword (disability, Cerebral Palsy, etc.).

  • https://www.collegeboard.org/
    • CollegeBoard, the same company that administers the Advancement Placement (AP) and SAT tests has $6 billion in scholarships on its website.
    • The real advantage to using this site is that it allows users of AP and SAT testing to use the same login and profile information that they entered for those programs to search for scholarships, as well as a host of other resources.

  • https://www.fastweb.com/
    • Fastweb, a subsidiary of Monster.com, also boasts around 1.5 million scholarships, with $3 billion in total scholarship funds on their site.
    • Fastweb requires users to create a profile in order to search for scholarships. The profile is free and takes 10-15 minutes.
    • Fastweb will tailor the scholarships that it shows users based on their profile, and will notify users of new scholarships that might interest them.
    • Fastweb also has free career advice, financial aid and college search resources.

There are many other sites that may work for you, but these are the three that I relied on when I was applying for college scholarships only a few years ago.

 

Before using these sites, it helped me to sit down and make a profile of myself. Starting with characteristics such as race, gender, disability status, etc. and, then, try to make a list of the things you were involved with in high school such as:  your academic interests, your hobbies, and your potential areas of study in college. Each and every one of these things can open the door to a potentially lucrative scholarship opportunity.

 

It is also important to keep a few things in mind as you begin your search for scholarships.

 

Look Locally

 

Don’t forget to look for scholarship opportunities in your local area. Ask your school counselor about local scholarships, and maybe even give your local area library a call. I learned about a few very important local scholarships through my library.

 

You should also find out which UCP Affiliate is closest to you by using your zip code in our affiliate finder. It is worth giving your local affiliate a call to see if they have any scholarship or  suggestions of other funding opportunities for students headed off to college.

 

Pay Special Attention to the School You Are Attending

 

If you know which school you will be attending, make sure to do everything you can to find out about all of your specific college’s  financial aid and scholarship opportunities. Many of the scholarships you apply to will be specific to that school, and can be found on their website or by contacting their financial aid office.

 

You may also want to contact the disability services offices at your prospective schools to see if there are any grants or scholarships available specifically for disabled students.

 

Keep Track of Deadlines and Eligibility

 

You will find that as you accumulate scholarship applications, you will accumulate even more deadlines. I recommend putting together a calendar that only has scholarship deadlines and keep it separate from your application deadlines.

 

Put the Work In

 

You will notice that there is a wild difference in the amounts of work required to apply to various scholarships. While it may be tempting to spend a lot of time applying to “no-essay” national scholarships with applications that don’t take much time, keep in mind that there are probably hundreds of thousands of other students doing the same thing. I’ve found that you will get out what you put into the scholarship process, so don’t ignore the scholarships that require an essay or two.

 

This is a good little resource for writing scholarship essays. It always helped me to try to envision who was going to be reading my essay, and why they were interested in me and what I had to say. Try to convince your friends, family, teachers, mentors and anyone who is willing to proofread your essays and provide suggestions. Don’t be shy!

 

Getting Started

 

Here are some trustworthy scholarships specifically for individuals with disabilities to get you started on your scholarship search:

Google Lime Scholarship Program

 

Microsoft DisAbility Scholarship

 

Newcombe Scholarship for Students with Disabilities

 

Ameriglide Achiever Scholarship

 

Joe Cleres Scholarships for Students with Disabilities

 

Foundation for Science and Disability

 

disABLEDperson Inc. National College Scholarship

 

NBCUniversal Tony Coelho Media Scholarship

 

It may also be worth checking out this financial aid resource for students with disabilities put out by George Washington University’s HEATH Resource Center. HEATH serves as a national online clearinghouse on postsecondary education for individuals with disabilities.  

 

In conclusion… applying to college is stressful for a plethora of reasons, but scholarships don’t have to be one of them!

Summer Camp For All

Image Description: A group of campers of all abilities smiling and enjoying their time around the pool.

Image Description: A group of campers of all abilities smiling and enjoying their time around the pool.

We can all fondly remember our summer camp experiences, exploring the outdoors and making memories. Summer camp, a place of adventure, excitement, and growth, is on the agenda for many children with and without disabilities this summer, and there are a multitude of options when it comes to choosing the perfect camp for you or your child.

United Cerebral Palsy’s affiliates around the country offer many different summer camp experiences. United Cerebral Palsy of Mobile’s Camp Smile, one of a handful of camps open to campers regardless of the severity of their disability or their financial means, is a camp exclusively for individuals with disabilities and their siblings. Glenn Harger, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy of Mobile, notes that Camp Smile “adapts to a child’s needs, instead of asking children to adapt to the camp.” United Cerebral Palsy of Delaware similarly invites children with and without a variety of disabilities to their two stellar day camps, Camp Lenape and Camp Manito. These camps foster friendships and make it possible for siblings to attend the same camp as children with disabilities. The camps, founded on the idea that children with disabilities are kids first, seek to create an inclusive environment for all children.

Image Description: A camper swimming in the pool with the help of a flotation device and two counselors.

Image Description: A camper swimming in the pool with the help of a flotation device and two counselors.

Camps Smile, Lenape, and Manito, in addition to many others, offer accessible grounds, dietary adjustments, and a greater proportion of camp counselors to campers than traditional camps. For example, Camp Smile makes accessibility a priority with its wheelchair accessible pathways, air conditioned log cabins and multi-purpose buildings, as well as an accessible bath house, among other amenities. Many camps across the nation specialize in specific services for children with disabilities. Some camps offer on-site speech and occupational therapy, teach campers how to ride bikes, focus on art therapy, or specialize in helping children succeed academically. Camps Lenape and Manito offer accessible swimming, with in-pool ramps to accommodate campers of all abilities and plenty of volunteers to help.

Perhaps the most notable aspect of camps which focus on disability is the lasting impact they can have on campers. Glenn recalled a young girl, around the age of four, and the evidence of her growth: “She just never smiled. The counselors put her on a horse and she had the biggest grin on her face.” Research supports the notion that children can benefit significantly from summer camps. A 2010 study published in the American Journal of Play found that camps can have positive cognitive, social, and identity effects on campers by combining skill improvement with fun and social activities.

Bill McCool, the Executive Director of United Cerebral Palsy of Delaware, fondly remembers the story of one young camper who had behavioral challenges, but for whom camp had a meaningful impact. The camper returned to UCP of Delaware when he was an adult, completely changed and matured, and applied to be an employee at the camp to help other young children benefit from the summer camp that had changed his life. Moved by this experience, McCool explained: “It means an awful lot when you see your campers become adults and you see who they become, at least in part because of the camp. That’s true for kids with disabilities, children without, and our volunteers. And many of them want to come back here!”

It’s no surprise that campers and volunteers alike look forward to returning to summer camps. At Camp Smile, campers can participate in zip lining, a ropes course, horseback riding, archery, swimming, fishing, and many more fun activities. The camp’s mission? To empower children and adults with disabilities to lead a life without limits.

 

Wondering if there is a UCP camp near you? Below is a partial list of United Cerebral Palsy affiliates that offer camp experiences.

ADAPT Community Network (New York City)

Easter Seals UCP (North Carolina and Virginia)

Stepping Stones Ohio

UCP of Central California

UCP of Central Florida

UCP Central Minnesota

UCP of Delaware

UCP of Greater Hartford

UCP Heartland (Missouri)

UCP of Hudson County (New Jersey)

UCP Land of Lincoln (Illinois)

UCP of MetroBoston

UCP of Mobile

UCP of Sacramento and Northern California

UCP of San Luis Obispo

UCP of Stanislaus and Tuolumne Counties

UCP of Tampa Bay

UCP of the Golden Gate

UCP of the North Bay

UCP of West Alabama

UCP of West Central Wisconsin

 

This post was written by Sara Shemali, Summer 2017 Programs and Development Intern at UCP National.

UCP Interns Visit Capitol Hill

 

This post was co-written by UCP Programs and Development Interns James O’Connor and Rebecca Zewdie

 

During our time interning for UCP’s National office, we have had the opportunity to learn about a range of policies that affect the lives of people with disabilities everyday. On June 22nd, we were given the chance to attend our first policy briefings on Capitol Hill. It was really interesting to get a taste of how the issues we have been learning about get discussed by advocates and other stakeholders here in DC. The briefings we were able to attend focused on issues surrounding employment for individuals with disabilities and Assistive  Technology (AT).

 

Employment (Rebecca’s perspective)

 

The first session of the day was a policy briefing that happened to be focused on the elimination of Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Hosted by Representative Gregg Harper (R-MS) in a small room in the Longworth House Office Building, I was shocked to see attendees of the event standing in the hallway because the room was so packed. That was my first glimpse at how important discussion of this particular issue  is to many people with disabilities, their families, and advocates.

 

Some of the speakers on the panel included those personally affected by Section 14(c), a longtime member of several Congressional committees, and a man who advocated to phase out 14(c) in the State of Maryland. It was an incredible experience to see what goes on behind the scenes of bills and how people work  together to advocate for policies they believe in. It was also important for me to see the significance of health care policy, and the ramifications it could potentially have on individuals.

 

Among the speakers at the briefing, there was one man who helped change this law in his home state. Ken Capone, a resident of Maryland, helped pass the Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA). The EEA mandates that the State of Maryland must phase-out  the payment of sub-minimum wage to those with disabilities by the year 2020. His ability to advocate for, and eventually to make, a critical change at the state level was inspiring. His contribution in Maryland will now prevent any individual with a disability from receiving a wage that is below the State’s standard for people without disabilities.

 

His in-depth analysis further solidified my drive to advocate for causes that are important to me. As I aspire to be involved in the health field one day, the briefing further affirmed  my chosen  career path. Attending this briefing also made me see the need for more conversations surrounding employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

 

Assistive Technology  (James’s Experience on Capitol Hill)

 

For people with and without disabilities, technology is a part of everyday life. As I’ve seen from day one of my internship here at UCP, Assistive Technology (AT)  is an integral part of the lives of many individuals with disabilities. I have witnessed first-hand how important AT is to someone like my supervisor, Karin. AT — such as her speech recognition software–  plays an important, daily role in enabling her to do her job. Because of the work I have done researching and advocating for technology-related legislation, it was exciting to learn that Karin and I would both be attending a technology-focused luncheon hosted by the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities (CCD).

 

The luncheon featured panelists speaking about AT and how it has helped them or their family members manage medication, go on vacation, exercise, access the web, communicate, and much more. I was particularly compelled by Jason Owen, who was in a car crash in 1990 that left him unable to communicate. With the help of AT, he has become an author, a motivational speaker, a self-help coach, and a mentor to people around the country. Listening to Jason, I realized that AT is not only a tool for survival; it can enable people to really excel.

 

After the panel, there was an assistive technology exposition with booths showcasing technology ranging from adapted Google Glasses to remote presence technology. I have seen how important something as simple as a motorized headrest can be, but to see some of the incredibly advanced technology available was breathtaking. Every technology at the expo was designed to make communication, travel, exercise, or work possible and practical for anyone and everyone.

 

As I learned more about AT, I came to realize that much of the technology I was admiring was funded by Medicaid for many of its users. I was disheartened to learn that the Senate’s healthcare bill could leave this technology out of reach for many of the Americans that need it. This fact, as well as everything I saw and learned at the luncheon, emphasized for me how important it is that I be an advocate and ally to those in the disability community through my work here at UCP.

What You Need to Know About College as a Student with a Disability

The transition from high school to college can be both a scary and exciting time for every student. College is a whole new world, and unlike anything most students have yet experienced.

 

Before heading off to college, students have questions and concerns about their future. Most students probably wonder about their major, whether they will like the school they have chosen, and what their new friends will be like, but for students with disabilities, the questions can often be a little more complicated.

 

Students with disabilities may wonder about accommodations, accessibility, services and supports, and getting help with everyday needs. And these questions may not be easy to answer.

 

As someone who’s a former college student, and an individual with a disability, I wanted to share some of the things that I wish I had known freshman year in hopes that it may make your transition a little bit easier.

 

Self Advocacy Is Key:

Growing up, it was typically the responsibility of your parents, teachers, or other administrators to make sure you got the accommodations and supports you needed to be successful in school. But, in college, it becomes primarily your responsibility.

 

Self-advocacy is always important but becomes especially essential when navigating college. College is often the first time students have lived away from home, and it is important to remember that you are your own best advocate: there are lots of supports in place to help you be successful, but you have to be proactive and reach out so that the people around you know what you may, or may not need.

 

Most schools have Offices or Departments of Disability Services in place to help students with disabilities get the accommodations they need, such as note-taking support, extra time on exams, or any other reasonable academic accommodation, but nobody from the office is going to seek you out, especially if they don’t even know you’re there.

 

Make a point to become familiar with the services and supports that exist on your campus. Talk to the disability support staff to work on a plan for your accommodations to help ensure success from day one. You are in college now and, like your peers without disabilities, there are still people there to help you, but for the most part, you are in the driver’s seat now!

 

The Laws Are Different:

K-12 education for students with disabilities is mandated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), this means that students with disabilities are entitled to public education and that it is the responsibility of the school to see that all students are getting an appropriate education. Colleges don’t fall under IDEA, and therefore, are not required to make accommodations to the same degree as the public school system.

 

In college, students with disabilities are protected from discrimination, such as inaccessibility of buildings, under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Schools must provide reasonable accommodations such as notetakers or extra time on exams, but they don’t have any obligation to modify coursework to accommodate students with disabilities or provide additional supports such as assistance with personal care or activities of daily living to ensure a student is successful.

So, if you are, for example, a wheelchair user who needs help to get in and out of bed or perform other daily activities, the ADA requires your school to provide you with an accessible dorm room, but there is no legal obligation to provide you with an assistant or other types of personal care support.

 

This is important to know because it means that you will need to set up the supports you need on your own before you head off to school. Some schools have programs to help students with personal care needs, but this is not a requirement for all schools. Look into what your school offers to figure out what kind of supports may be available.

 

For more information about the difference in laws governing K-12 education and college check out the resources below:

 

https://umaine.edu/disability/accommodations-high-school-vs-college/

 

https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transitionguide.html

 

https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

 

 

It’s Okay to Reach out for Help and Support:

If you’re feeling overwhelmed, or struggling more than you thought you would, there is absolutely no shame in asking for help. Mental and emotional well-being is just as important as physical health, and academic support.

 

Most colleges have a variety of services to support students from health centers, to counseling and other mental health services, and wellness programs, in addition to academic supports. Take advantage of the support and community that exists around you, and don’t be afraid to reach out.

 

Additionally, there are lots of groups and activities on college campuses, and many colleges even have organizations run by and for students with disabilities. These organizations may or may not be support oriented. Many of them may just be social groups, or groups focused on advocacy and activism.

 

Whether or not they are disability focused, student organizations and extracurricular activities can be another great place to find support in college.

 

 

Transition Is Not One-Size-Fits-All:

Everybody is unique, which means that everyone’s experience in transitioning from high school to what comes after will look, feel, and be, very different. Whether you’re planning to go to school far away, attend college close to home, or do something else after high school, it’s important to remember there is no right way to transition from high school to beyond.

 

Whatever you decide to do after high school graduation, focus on making sure that it’s the right option for you, rather than worrying about whether it’s what other people expect.

 

For more information you need to know,  check out the topics below:

What You Need to Know About Preventative Care and Disability
What You Need to Know About Sexual and Reproductive Health and Disability

UCP Expresses Concerns About American Health Care Act of 2017

Last Thursday, Members of the House of Representatives passed, by a narrow margin, H.R. 1628 (the American Health Care Act of 2017, or AHCA for short). United Cerebral Palsy, along with our colleagues in Washington, expressed concerns about the bill in its current form (as well as previous proposals that were circulated).

 

We joined coalitions focused on the preservation of coverage for individuals with pre-existing conditions, coverage for rehabilitative and habilitative services, and protecting Medicaid. We also took part in advocacy efforts with the Consortium of Citizens with Disabilities, a coalition of 100 national disability organizations working together to advocate for national public policy that ensures the self-determination, independence, empowerment, integration, and inclusion of children and adults with disabilities in all aspects of society. In short, we are not alone in our concerns and we will continue to work together to fight this harmful bill.

We share the concerns many of you have voiced to us about the lack of review by the Congressional Budget Office of this latest bill, and the potentially devastating consequences the House bill as written could have on the 175,000 families served by UCP’s affiliate network (and really all individuals with disabilities who rely on Medicaid for health coverage and/or long-term services and supports).

We are hopeful that as the Senate deliberates, more information about the projected impact of the House bill will become known and that the Senate will not pass a bill that would bring harm to our community.

Senators need to hear from constituents, and we hope you will tell your story. To learn more about UCP’s public policy work and to get involved, please visit http://ucp.org/what-we-do/public-policy/

WineBev Creating Opportunity to “Work Without Limits”

The Napa Valley is known for gorgeous weather and of course for wine. UCP’s affiliate in the Napa Valley area, UCP of the North Bay, works to bring together the wine industry and individuals with disabilities. WineBev Services began in 2007 and is helping to acknowledge the need for labor in the region, while opening doors for more accessible and competitive employment for people with disabilities. “It was a natural fit given the area,” says Mike Lisenko, President of Business Operations for WineBev.

 

WineBev works with around 15 to 20 wineries in the area at any given time during the season. They currently employ 115 individuals with disabilities, working in all areas – from packing to fulfillment. Potential employees are referred to WineBev from the local regional center in Napa, which helps to pair individuals with providers in the community. Candidates go through a job skills training course before finding the area that best suits their skills. WineBev provides both community-based and supportive employment. They also work with the the hospitality industry in the area, giving greater flexibility to area employers and finding roles that best suit each individual employee’s strengths.

 

WineBev estimates that nearly 200 individuals have come through the program, with several finding employment on their own after their time there. At UCP of the North Bay, living a “life without limits” plays a role in every aspect of life – both work and play. At WineBev, “Work Without Limits” is more than just a tagline – it’s a purpose and flows through every facet of WineBev, from monitoring to packing, to creating employment opportunity for all.

 

Special thanks to Mike Lisenko, President of Business Operations for WineBev.

 

For more information on WineBev, please visit www.winebev.com.

 

To find out more about UCP of the North Bay and their programs, visit their website at http://ucpnb.org/.

 

UCP of Michigan Staff Invited to Attend Meeting Called by The Pope

Special thanks to Glenn Ashley, retired staff from UCP, for his assistance in working to help put this post together. 

UCP of Michigan’s Public Policy Specialist, Barb Valliere, was invited to attend the U.S. Regional Meeting of Popular Movements (RMOPM), which ran from February 16-19 in Modesto, CA.Part of international movements called by the Pope, the meeting in California brought together nearly 700 leaders from clergy members to grassroots leaders to provide input on a variety of social issues, including: job access and inclusion for people with disabilities, environmental issues, and racism. This meeting was the third in a series of international meetings (the previous two were held in Rome and Bolivia) aimed at bringing together members of the clergy and grassroots activists. For Barb, while the journey to California marked her first time on a plane, as Catholic woman with cerebral palsy it was an opportunity she could not pass up.

Ms. Valliere was one of three people invited from the Lansing, MI area to attend the meeting. Her invitation was a result of her leadership and work in community organizing efforts at the state and national levels. Initially, no one from the area was scheduled to speak, however, an issue with accessibility changed all of that. After requesting to be put in an accessible room, Barb was put in a room that was not accessible for her. The conference organizers were able to rectify the problem and accommodate her with another room. RMOPM asked her if she would like to address the entire assembly at dinner about the problem and her experience as person with a disability.


In her remarks to the assembly, she emphasized the importance of civil rights for people with disabilities. Attendees were reminded that when they plan events and invite people, to make sure to take care of their needs and have the event accessible to all, and to not assume that a space is accessible on word alone. She also encouraged other individuals with disabilities to advocate for yourself to ensure that your needs are met. Ms. Valliere made her point in community organizing fashion, encouraging event participants to move deeper into a  discussion on access and issues that affect the disability community.

 

Information for the blog was taken from movimientospopulares.org‘s press release.

Jeffrey Cooper, Recipient of the Kathy O. Maul Leadership Award at 2017 UCP Annual Meeting

Congratulations to Jeffrey Cooper, President, and CEO of UCP of Central Pennsylvania on being named the recipient of the Kathy O. Maul Leadership Award at the 2017 UCP Annual Meeting in Nashville, TN!

Thank you for all of your hard work, leadership, and dedication to individuals with disabilities!

Jeffrey Cooper, President, and CEO of UCP of Cental PA with Interim CEO of the UCP national office, Rick Forkosh.