UCP and the National Veterans Center Present the Engage Series on May 5, 2015

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UCP and the National Veterans Center present the next installment in the Engage Series on May 5, 2015 from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm at the National Youth Transitions Center at 2013 H Street NW in Washington, D.C.

Participants will have the opportunity to network, learn more about upcoming events and discuss volunteer opportunities and other ways they can become involved in their communities. For more information, or how to register for the event, click here.  

What Do YOU Know about UCP?

United Cerebral Palsy: Life without limits for people with disabilities

What do YOU know about UCP? We’re a network of affiliated nonprofit organizations working to ensure a Life without Limits™ for both children and adults with a broad range of disabilities and their families.

Tell Us More About The UCP Network.

UCP’s approximately nearly 80 affiliated organizations range from large providers like Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare in Minnesota, to smaller but no less impactful organizations from New England to California. Our affiliates’ influence can be felt as far away as Canada and Australia.

Each organization acts independently to provide the advocacy, support and services needed in their communities. Many have programs in place to address direct needs for therapy, housing, transportation, employment and family support. Many spend time advocating for public policy changes at the local, state and even national level. Many work to raise awareness of the issues facing people with disabilities and their families, and all work to secure the necessary resources to carry out UCP’s mission.

Who, Exactly, Do You Serve?

UCP is proud to serve people with a range of disabilities, their families, and by extension their communities. Sometimes, you will hear that 65% of the people served by UCP affiliates have disabilities in addition to, or other than, cerebral palsy. While percentages vary by affiliate and can change over the years, the truth is that UCP places a priority on serving people in need, regardless of diagnosis. UCP providers typically serve people with the most severe and multiple disabilities.24JL04GD

At the national level, UCP advocates for change in public policy. And, we work to raise awareness of the major issues common to many people with disabilities: access, resources, support and respect. At the local level, UCP affiliates work hard to provide the supports and services most needed in their communities. Their capacity to serve is only bound by the resources they have available.

If You Serve People with All Disabilities, Why Are You Called United Cerebral Palsy?

We are proud of our heritage. United Cerebral Palsy’s name has a long history, going back to 1949. In the 1940s, there were not many options for families of and people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities. What began as the brainstorm of a few parents of children with cerebral palsy quickly grew in to a nationwide crusade to improve the lives of people with all disabilities. From it’s inception, UCP brought issues about cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities to the forefront of the national media.

While the words “United Cerebral Palsy” do not fully express the scope of our work, UCP has served as a trusted name for millions of people for more than 60 years. As with many iconic brands, which have grown and evolved over time, the true heart of our identity lies in the associations people make when they hear our name, not in the name itself.11JE04GD

Why Don’t You Just Focus on Cerebral Palsy?

Because more than 176,000 people rely on UCP every day. If we can advocate for a public policy that provides access to more affordable housing options for with disabilities, should we apply that policy only to people with CP? If we can encourage respect for all people, should we only try to put an end to bullying against children with CP? If we can inspire an innovator to design a device that is more accessible, should we insist that only people with CP be able to use it? United Cerebral Palsy works hard to help individuals overcome barriers to a Life Without Limits™, and we have found that sometimes the biggest barriers of all are the ones that come with assigning labels and defining limits.

Innovation Lab Design Challenge Debuts

Intensive Two-Day Event from UCP’s Life Labs Coming to Chicago 

 

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) Life Labs initiative will bring an intensive, two-day design challenge called an Innovation Lab to Chicago May 19-20, 2015. Following successful events in London, Washington DC, and Sydney, Australia, the Innovation Lab (formerly called Enabled by Design-athon) brings together people from all walks of life under the principles of Universal Design to dream up the next big idea for people with and without disabilities.

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At each Innovation Lab, this diversity of talent from a variety of fields is coached to use human-centered Universal Design concepts to solve every day problems as part of a competitive yet collaborative design challenge for team prizes. Designers, engineers, inventors, makers and hackers as well as professionals and caregivers in the disability field are all encouraged to contribute their unique perspectives to the process.

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Innovation Lab Featured Speaker Paul Edlund – Microsoft Core Technologies Chief Technologist

The inaugural Innovation Lab scheduled for Chicago will take place at the Microsoft Technology Center and will be co-hosted by Smart Chicago. Smart Chicago is a civic organization devoted to improving lives in Chicago through technology by increasing access to the Internet, improving skills for using Internet, and developing meaningful products from data that measurably contribute to the quality of life of residents in the region and beyond.

“Here at Microsoft we are focused on improving the lives of citizens through technology,” said Shelley Stern Grach, Director of Civic Engagement at Microsoft. “The Innovation Lab focuses on the principles of design to provide opportunity and access to technology for diverse communities, and we’re excited to sMicrosoft Technology Center 2ee what the teams come up with.”

Teams will design and build prototypes or present plans that demonstrate how products can rapidly be created to better fit with people’s lives and needs, no matter what those need may be. UCP’s Life Labs is intent on creating a movement of accessibility for the masses so that mainstream products work for as many people as possible, including those with disabilities and older people. The Innovation Lab events are meant to challenge preconceptions of assistive equipment, showing how products can be personalized, purposeful and beautifully designed too.

“Rather than continuing to retrofit our world to accommodate people with disabilities, there’s no reason why we can’t design our world to work for people of all abilities,” said Marc Irlandez, Director of UCP’s Life Labs.

Registration is now open at http://ucpinnovationlab.org/ Space is limited.

 

Co-hosted by:

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Thanks to our sponsors:

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Enabled by Design-athon from an OT’s Perspective

Guest post contributed by Clarice Torrey, occupational therapist and winner of UCP Life Lab’s recent Design-athon People’s Choice Award. 

 

Clarice Torrey

I nerded out a bit when I first saw @UCPLifeLabs tweet about the Enabled-by Design-athon in DC. I had already become familiar with Enabled by Design and UCP Life Labs through the wonderful world of Twitter, but this event was exactly what I’d been looking for. I’m an occupational therapist who works primarily with children who have cerebral palsy, and I want to blend my knowledge of disability with my passion for designing and making. Over the past 10+ years as an occupational therapist, I have designed and fabricated many adaptive aids and splints. The Design-athon felt like it was made for me.

Even so, I didn’t exactly know what to expect. Thursday morning I walked into the event at Google’s DC headquarters and was assigned to a team consisting of Jessica Bonness, an interior designer, educator and our team facilitator; Jessica Denson, an interior design student; Emily Flax, an industrial designer; Patricia Torres, a universal design student; and Reem Bagais, an interior design student. We started with empathy exercises to gain a better understanding of what it’s like to have a disability. For instance, we put on gloves to search for items in our purse and used earplugs/headphones to simulate a hearing impairment. The exercise that resonated the most with us was doing activities with limited dexterity and only having the use of one upper extremity.

Our question became this: How can we facilitate increased independence for people with limited to no use of one upper extremity? There are so many daily activities most people take for granted that are made possible or easier with two hands. We wanted a tool that could be worn or at least easily accessible to provide the stabilization that so many two-handed tasks require. For instance when zipping up a jacket, you can complete the task with only one hand, but it will probably take you longer and you might have to use your teeth or another awkward adaptation.Empathy Exercise

As an occupational therapist, I do activity analysis so often it’s become second nature. One thing I frequently tell families is that the two hands don’t have to have equal skills in order to be functional. Almost all of us have a dominant hand that does most of the work, I usually call the other hand the “helper hand.” It’s the stabilizer. We used this information to brainstorm: How do we stabilize or grip objects? How do we attach things to our bodies?

The wall and sticky notes quickly became our friends.

As the word wearable was written on the wall, Emily saw it as “we are able” and we quickly decided that was our team name. We continued brainstorming.

Emily took the lead and we began adding to our lists and calling out some really random things. At one point, I became extremely interested in the idea of electromagnetics. I excused myself from the group for a bit to consult with some engineering/tech friends: Philip Lindsay and Darian Ahler. One of the original team ideas was a bracelet with an attachment to stabilize something. In the case of zipping up a jacket, you would reach over to one side of the jacket and activate an electromagnet to stabilize the jacket, as your unaffected hand managed the zipper and pulled it up. My friends talked me through solenoids and balloon/coffee grounds grippers. As I tried to do some research on the feasibility of something higher tech, the rest of the team continued working on other ideas.

It was a real shuffle to present to the crowd and update them on our progress. It was also a good way to keep us moving forward. It was fun to hear what the other seven teams at the event were working on. There was clearly some amazing minds coming together to come up with beautiful, functional designs to benefit all.

Our design continued to develop that first day. We had the opportunity to consult with Brett Heising of brettapproved.com. He has limited dexterity in his right hand. He told us the most difficult tasks for him were tying a tie and buttoning the top button and sleeves of a dress shirt. I simulated our design theory by using my hand to form a “clip” and stabilize the material of his shirt sleeve held together. He still wasn’t able to button the button.

I asked Brett if he had ever used a button hook, which is a common buttoning aid. He said he had, but challenged us to come up with a better design. We realized that our stabilizer had the potential to develop by adding different attachments based on the individual needs. I continued problem-solving a tool for this specific task, but it is still in development.We Are Able Prototypes

The stabilizing gripper we had designed would facilitate tying a tie though and we began to list all of the activities it would help with. It could help zip up jackets, open ziplock baggies, open other packages, hold a fork for cutting with a knife, hold paper while cutting with scissors, and hold a smartphone for the other hand to easily access.

As our first day came to an end, we felt that the palm of the hand would provide more stability than the wrist and that a low tech attachment would be more feasible. The next day we would bring various materials and clips to problem-solve what would work best. We consulted with representatives from PSC Engineering who were on hand with 3-D printers to print out a modified version of a slide clip pants hanger clip, which is the type of attachment piece we were leaning towards.

As I left the first day, I was exhausted and exhilarated. Now that we had a basic concept, I needed some hands-on inspiration. I needed to touch and feel materials and process. I walked up and down every aisle of a local Wal-Mart letting my brain work through the possibilities. I bought ribbon, chain and leather bracelets, yarn, a crochet hook, metal picnic tablecloth clips, and various other supplies we could possibly use tomorrow to put together a prototype. I knew it wouldn’t be as pretty as I would like, but I knew it might help us make a functioning tool.

Friday morning was crunch time. Patricia set to work on the computer animated design. Jessica worked on the slides for the presentation. With everyone’s “supply” contribution in the middle of the table some of us began playing with materials. We ended up using the tablecloth hooks and reformed them into a universal cuff. We covered the metal in leather and attached a slide-lock hanger clip. We covered the clip in Sugru for aesthetics and for greater stability at the latch.

Winning DesignWe were still making changes it was time to present to the judges, but we were proud of what we made in just a short time. This small tool had the ability to assist people with cerebral palsy, stroke, arthritis and other disabilities be more functional and independent. Our presentation went well, and I really felt that the judges and the people in the room appreciated and valued our hard work and what we had done in such a short time. We were awarded the People’s Choice Award and a Google Chromecast each! Brett talked to us about a friend in Arizona that could help with bringing our design to market.

For me, the Design-athon was an opportunity to collaborate with like-minded people passionate about design and disability. It allowed me to blend my knowledge, creativity, and passion. Designing and making adaptive aides has been one of my life pursuits, and with this experience, I feel confident that I am moving in the right direction.

 

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UCP Annual Conference

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UCP’s Annual Conference brings together over 200 of the most engaged and influential leaders of United Cerebral Palsy’s large national network (commanding a collective budget of $1 billion) to focus on our vision for people with disabilities and their families. As service providers, advocates, professionals and volunteers, the national leadership of UCP use the conference to collaborate and innovate. We will use UCP’s newly adopted strategic plan to map out our approach in the coming year.

This year’s theme centers on a unique sculpture in Chicago’s Millennium Park. Cloud Gate, or “The Bean,” as it is called, symbolizes how UCP, our vital volunteer leaders, and our 80+ affiliates reflect the individuals and families we serve. It is futuristic and awe-inspiring yet accessible, made up of hundreds of panels fused together to appear seamless: symbolic of the vision UCP has for its network and the movement for people with disabilities everywhere.

I Give Thanks Every Day

A Message from Stephen Bennett

“At this time of year, many of us start to reflect on what we are thankful for – family, friends, our home, our health. For me, being thankful is part of what I do every day. 

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UCP President and CEO, Stephen Bennett

Just like you, I am thankful for many things, not the least of which is the fact that I get to do what I do for a living. My career started in California when I served as a caregiver for people with disabilities. I was part of a sea change as large institutions were closed and many people with disabilities were able to live in their communities for the first time.

Although there were challenges, I was thankful for what I knew would be a positive change in society. When I came to UCP I was thankful that a national network existed to serve people with disabilities and their families. I was thankful that so many professionals and experts were working together to provide the essential services, support, advice and advocacy needed by 176,000 people with a broad range of disabilities every day. And, I was thankful that I could lead a national office, which would support that network with a voice in Washington, D.C, and national programs such as My Child Without Limits, which provides valuable resources and information to parents of young children with disabilities.

Tuesday, December 2 is #GivingTuesday – a day on which everyone is urged to donate to a favorite cause after the madness of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. It’s meant to remind us that there are always more important things in life than holiday shopping. I hope you will join us by making a donation to UCP. If you give on #GivingTuesday, the Network for Good has promised to us $1 for every $20 we raise.

I am so very thankful for you – our supporters – who donate to ensure that this organization remains strong and move forward. As we close out this year and look forward, I encourage you to get involved and continue to support UCP. ”

Thank you!

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Thank You to Our Champions in Congress!

 

UCP has long relied on several advocates in Congress to help us push for positive Federal policies for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Some of these champions – such as Senators Tom Harkin, Jay Rockefeller, and Carl Levin and Representatives Henry Waxman, George Miller, and John Dingell are retiring and passing the baton to the next generation of legislators. 

This video honors those retiring Members of Congress for their legislative successes on behalf of people disabilities and was jointly developed by six national organizations – The Arc, American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Association of University Centers on Disabilities, National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities, Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered, and United Cerebral Palsy. 

On behalf of UCP, we would like to say “thank you” to these champions and we look forward to working with other Senators and Representatives who would like to continue their work to improve the lives of people with disabilities and their families. 

 

Former Deputy Secretary of Labor, LinkedIn VP, Business Leader to Contribute to UCP’s Mission

 

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Seth Harris, Former Deputy Secretary of Labor and Cornell Distinguished Scholar

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) elected ten members to its Board of Trustees during its 2014 Annual Conference in Nashville, Tennessee including three members new to the organization. Seth Harris, former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Labor, Pablo Chavez, LinkedIn’s Vice President of Public Policy and a parent of a son with a disability, and Ouida Spencer, a long-time UCP advocate and volunteer from Georgia will join seven re-elected members to lead UCP into the future.

“Our Board of Trustees plays a critical role in guiding the UCP network forward, and we are honored to welcome such a talented and knowledgeable group onto the Board this year. We are very grateful for each new member’s dedication to our mission of enabling a life without limits for people with disabilities and their families, and look forward to their contributions,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy, in announcing the selection of Trustees.

Profiles of the newest board members are below. To view the complete list including re-elected trustees, please visit ucp.org/about/board.

Seth Harris served four and a half years as the US Deputy Secretary of Labor and six months as Acting US Secretary of Labor and a member of President Barack Obama’s Cabinet before becoming a Distinguished Scholar at Cornell and joining Dentons’ Public Policy and Regulation practice. He did some consultancy work for UCP in 2007 and 2008, most notably as the designer of the programmatic work that launched UCP’s Life Labs.

While at the Department of Labor, Harris contributed to our country’s economic recovery and millions of Americans returning to work. In 2007, Harris chaired Obama for America’s Labor, Employment and Workplace Policy Committee, and later founded the campaign’s Disability Policy Committee.  He oversaw the Obama-Biden transition team’s efforts in the Labor, Education and Transportation departments and 12 other agencies in 2008.

Also, Harris was a professor of law at New York Law School and director of its Labor and Employment Law programs as well as a scholar of the economics of disability law and topics.

Pablo Chavez is Vice President of Global Public Policy for LinkedIn and the parent of a young son with cerebral palsy. From 2006 to early 2014, Chavez was a member of Google’s public policy and government affairs team, where he held several leadership roles developing and executing advocacy initiatives promoting access to the Internet and other technologies.

Before then, Pablo worked in the US Senate as a counsel to Senator John McCain and to the Senate Commerce Committee. Pablo serves on the Board of Trustees for St. Coletta of Greater Washington, which is dedicated to assisting children and adults with special needs, and serves as a board member and in advisory capacities for a number of technology-related organizations. A graduate of Stanford Law School and Princeton University, Pablo lives in Washington, DC with his wife and two children.

Ouida Spencer has been a licensed Real Estate Broker and consultant in Georgia and South Carolina for over 17 years.  Previously she worked in banking as Senior Vice President with SunTrust Bank and Group Vice President with Decatur Federal.

She specializes in locating homes that can be modified for individuals with special needs and has worked to acquire properties for over 500 people who required special accessibility modifications. Spencer is a tireless advocate for housing rights of individuals with disabilities.

Spencer was nominated to UCP’s Board of Trustees after years of dedication to UCP affiliates in her area and her other volunteer efforts. Spencer is a Member of the DeKalb Association of Realtors, Chairman of the Board of Directors of UCP of Georgia, Member of the UCP Master Board of Directors South Florida/Georgia/South Carolina, Vice Chairman and Member of the Board of Directors UCP of South Carolina and a member of the UCP Affiliate Services Committee. Other volunteer activities include serving on the Board of Trustees of the Rosebud McCormick Foundation for over 26 years.

Spencer is the Past State President of the Georgia Federation of Business and Professional Women Club’s, Inc.  She is currently serving as Treasurer of the Decatur BPW and was recently elected to the Family Extended Care, Inc. board.

A graduate of Georgia State University where she received both her BBA and MBA degrees, Spencer lives in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

 

 

Father and Son Racing Duo Inspire Teams to Get Active, Support UCP

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United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is honored to announce that Team Hoyt, Rick Hoyt of Sturbridge, MA and Dick Hoyt of Holland, MA, will serve as the 2014 Steptember event Ambassadors.

Steptember is a four-week event to raise awareness and support for people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities. Beginning on September 3, teams from around the world will challenge themselves to take 10,000 steps a day and fundraise along the way— and nearly any activity, including biking, physical therapy and yoga, can be converted into steps. Find out more about the event and how you can participate on the Steptember website. 

Team Hoyt will lend their “Yes You Can” attitude to rally teams participating in this year’s Steptember event. Last year, over 10,000 people worldwide participated in the challenge and raised nearly $1 million. Team Hoyt is committed to helping make this year’s event an even bigger success!

Rick Hoyt may use a wheelchair, but that has not stopped him from competing in over 1100 athletic events across the past 37 years. Together, Rick and his father Dick are known across the disability community and race circuit as Team Hoyt. They have run in 70 marathons – 32 of them being the Boston Marathon – and have competed in over 250 triathlons. After the pair’s first race in 1977, Rick said running felt like his disability disappeared. He felt free.

Rick was born in 1962 as a spastic quadriplegic with cerebral palsy– but despite these disabilities, Rick’s mind and spirit have always been strong.  His family supported his quest for independence and inclusion in community, sports, education, and the workplace, culminating with his graduation from Boston University in 1993. 

Dick travels the country doing corporate and community presentations, educating the public about disability awareness, and promoting the Team Hoyt motto: “Yes You Can.”  Through his presentations, Dick shares his lifelong commitment to changing attitudes and educating others on the world of disabilities. We look forward to seeing this message empower Steptember affiliates, participants, and supporters to adopt the same mentality between now, the event’s conclusion on September 30th, and beyond!

“Our family is personally affected by disability and we know first-hand what perseverance can accomplish. Joining in the Steptember campaign, like a entering a marathon, is a way to show the world what you can do once you have committed to something,” said Dick Hoyt. “When asked to be a part of Stepember, Rick and I accepted right away, as this campaign aligns with the Team Hoyt mission of empowering people with disabilities”

“Dick and Rick Hoyt are the perfect ambassadors for Steptember. They truly embody their motto – “Yes You Can” – and show individuals with disabilities, their families, and the people who care about them how to ‘live a life without limits,’” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of UCP. “We are proud that they are on board to help inspire us all to take 10,000 steps a day toward an admirable goal.”

 Team Hoyt

For more information about Team Hoyt and the duo’s 37 years of racing, please visit their website at www.teamhoyt.com.

 

 

 

2013 WORLD CEREBRAL PALSY CHALLENGE BEGINS TODAY!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

2013 WORLD CEREBRAL PALSY CHALLENGE BEGINS TODAY!

More than 1,500 participants commit to 10,000 steps a day to raise awareness and support for people with CP and other disabilities

Washington, DC (September 4, 2013) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) announced the launch of the second annual World Cerebral Palsy (CP) Challenge today, an international health and fitness event to raise awareness and support for people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities.

The World CP Challenge is a month long campaign that encourages people to get active while supporting a great cause. Throughout September, more than 4,000 teams worldwide will challenge themselves to take 10,000 steps a day. Each of the steps—or bike rides, or yoga classes, or physical therapy sessions, as nearly any activity can be counted—will propel the teams up virtual mountains and track their progress. Teams can compare their progress against others from around the world, racing each other up the seven tallest mountains and spurring their efforts to new heights. And together, the teams will help to raise critical support for people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities.

Already, more than $50,000 has been raised in the U.S., and more than $500,000 internationally—but we still have a long way to go. Join the thousands of participants and World CP Challenge Ambassadors, Team Long Brothers, and help raise support for people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities today! Sign up is open through Wednesday, September 11. At the end of the month, the World CP Challenge will culminate on October 2 with World Cerebral Palsy Day, a global innovation project to change the world for people with cerebral palsy

“UCP is very excited to kick off the second annual World Cerebral Palsy Challenge! This month promises to be an incredible, worldwide effort to raise awareness and support for people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities. The World CP Challenge is such a great way for anyone, regardless of ability, to get involved and make a real difference for people with disabilities,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of UCP. “We look forward to seeing each team’s progress throughout the month, and to finishing strong on World Cerebral Palsy Day on October 2. Good luck to everyone, and see you on the mountain!”

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About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.