UCP Welcomes United Community Options of South Florida to the UCP Affiliate Network

UCP would like to welcome United Community Options of South Florida (formerly known as UCP of South Florida) to the UCP Affiliate ​Network! United Community Options of South Florida was formed in 1947 by a group of parents in Miami who came together to look for services for their children with cerebral palsy.

United Community Options of South Florida oversees UCO of Miami, UCO of Broward, Palm Beach and Mid Coast Counties and Miami Cerebral Palsy Residential Services Inc.  United Community Options of South Florida provides a wide variety of supports and services including programs for adults and children with disabilities as well as typically developing children and adolescents. Programs provided include: Schools (private, charter, summer, afterschool), Residential services (group homes and ICF/IID), Supported Living, Supported Employment, Adult Day Services, Therapies, and much more.

In 2016, the organization formally became United Community Options of South Florida. We are proud to welcome back as an affiliate the rich heritage of UCO and their roots in UCP.

UCP National Talks Assistive Tech with Provail

This post was written by UCP Summer 2017 Programs and Development Intern, James O’Connor

 

“We try to ask ourselves: what would make this person’s life better, faster, easier?”

This is what motivates Brenda Chappell, Director of Clinical Services at Provail, a UCP affiliate located in Seattle, Washington. Brenda recently spoke to us about Provail’s assistive technology programs.

[Image Description: A white woman with short brown hair wearing a green sweater and a black scarf holds a smartphone to a book while reading in what appears to be a children’s classroom. She is looking off to the side.] Photo: Lawrence Roffee

 

Assistive technology is an umbrella term that covers equipment, software, system, or any item that is used by people to find and or maintain a job and/or perform activities of daily living. Technology can be big, like an automated lift for van or bath, or small, like a Velcro-attached grip for a fork or a pen. It can be new-age interactive voice activated software for speech therapy or a wheelchair component. It can be high-tech–a computer screen operated by eye movement or low-tech, like a specially-designed door handle for people with muscle strength or dexterity problems.

Assistive technology can often be complex and very user-specific, and this is where Provail’s team plays an important role. At their AT (assistive technology) clinic, they take a holistic approach to finding the best technology for each person.

Brenda and her colleagues’ AT  programs bring professionals from Provail into schools and homes to recommend AT, and teach users, parents, teachers, therapists, and caregivers the best ways to put a person’s AT to best use. Provail works with kids as young as 4 years old, as well as adult clients, and individuals all the way through the lifespan.

Brenda notes that students with earlier access to AT have overwhelmingly better outcomes in both learning and lifestyle. She makes it clear that enabling mobility and communication at an early age are core to the program at Provail. “Before this unique program, we would see adults coming into the clinic with no AT and no mobility. Now, parents doing a 10-week program with us are finding successes that they never knew were possible.”

On top of helping people find and use the best possible AT for their needs, Provail also helps connect users with typical and alternative funding sources, making the stressful process of financing AT easier for many of their clients.

As assistive technology becomes more complex, more varied, and more common, it is important to put people first and keep in mind Brenda’s important question: what would make this person’s life better, faster, easier?
Check out your local affiliate to find out more about what type of AT services may be available, including financial resources that may be available.

What You Need to Know About College as a Student with a Disability

The transition from high school to college can be both a scary and exciting time for every student. College is a whole new world, and unlike anything most students have yet experienced.

 

Before heading off to college, students have questions and concerns about their future. Most students probably wonder about their major, whether they will like the school they have chosen, and what their new friends will be like, but for students with disabilities, the questions can often be a little more complicated.

 

Students with disabilities may wonder about accommodations, accessibility, services and supports, and getting help with everyday needs. And these questions may not be easy to answer.

 

As someone who’s a former college student, and an individual with a disability, I wanted to share some of the things that I wish I had known freshman year in hopes that it may make your transition a little bit easier.

 

Self Advocacy Is Key:

Growing up, it was typically the responsibility of your parents, teachers, or other administrators to make sure you got the accommodations and supports you needed to be successful in school. But, in college, it becomes primarily your responsibility.

 

Self-advocacy is always important but becomes especially essential when navigating college. College is often the first time students have lived away from home, and it is important to remember that you are your own best advocate: there are lots of supports in place to help you be successful, but you have to be proactive and reach out so that the people around you know what you may, or may not need.

 

Most schools have Offices or Departments of Disability Services in place to help students with disabilities get the accommodations they need, such as note-taking support, extra time on exams, or any other reasonable academic accommodation, but nobody from the office is going to seek you out, especially if they don’t even know you’re there.

 

Make a point to become familiar with the services and supports that exist on your campus. Talk to the disability support staff to work on a plan for your accommodations to help ensure success from day one. You are in college now and, like your peers without disabilities, there are still people there to help you, but for the most part, you are in the driver’s seat now!

 

The Laws Are Different:

K-12 education for students with disabilities is mandated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), this means that students with disabilities are entitled to public education and that it is the responsibility of the school to see that all students are getting an appropriate education. Colleges don’t fall under IDEA, and therefore, are not required to make accommodations to the same degree as the public school system.

 

In college, students with disabilities are protected from discrimination, such as inaccessibility of buildings, under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Schools must provide reasonable accommodations such as notetakers or extra time on exams, but they don’t have any obligation to modify coursework to accommodate students with disabilities or provide additional supports such as assistance with personal care or activities of daily living to ensure a student is successful.

So, if you are, for example, a wheelchair user who needs help to get in and out of bed or perform other daily activities, the ADA requires your school to provide you with an accessible dorm room, but there is no legal obligation to provide you with an assistant or other types of personal care support.

 

This is important to know because it means that you will need to set up the supports you need on your own before you head off to school. Some schools have programs to help students with personal care needs, but this is not a requirement for all schools. Look into what your school offers to figure out what kind of supports may be available.

 

For more information about the difference in laws governing K-12 education and college check out the resources below:

 

https://umaine.edu/disability/accommodations-high-school-vs-college/

 

https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transitionguide.html

 

https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

 

 

It’s Okay to Reach out for Help and Support:

If you’re feeling overwhelmed, or struggling more than you thought you would, there is absolutely no shame in asking for help. Mental and emotional well-being is just as important as physical health, and academic support.

 

Most colleges have a variety of services to support students from health centers, to counseling and other mental health services, and wellness programs, in addition to academic supports. Take advantage of the support and community that exists around you, and don’t be afraid to reach out.

 

Additionally, there are lots of groups and activities on college campuses, and many colleges even have organizations run by and for students with disabilities. These organizations may or may not be support oriented. Many of them may just be social groups, or groups focused on advocacy and activism.

 

Whether or not they are disability focused, student organizations and extracurricular activities can be another great place to find support in college.

 

 

Transition Is Not One-Size-Fits-All:

Everybody is unique, which means that everyone’s experience in transitioning from high school to what comes after will look, feel, and be, very different. Whether you’re planning to go to school far away, attend college close to home, or do something else after high school, it’s important to remember there is no right way to transition from high school to beyond.

 

Whatever you decide to do after high school graduation, focus on making sure that it’s the right option for you, rather than worrying about whether it’s what other people expect.

 

For more information you need to know,  check out the topics below:

What You Need to Know About Preventative Care and Disability
What You Need to Know About Sexual and Reproductive Health and Disability

How Well Does Your State Serve People with Disabilities?

Arizona, Maryland, Missouri, New York & Hawaii Top 2015 Case for Inclusion Rankings

 

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2015 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report and interactive website used to track state-by-state community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

To download and read the entire Case for Inclusion report or explore the data, visit cfi.ucp.org.

TCase for Inclusionhe annual Case for Inclusion examines data and outcomes for all 50 States and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators. These indicators include how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. The report is a product of a comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

In addition to rankings, the report digs deeper into two critical issues facing people with disabilities and their families: waiting lists for services and support and transitioning from high school into an adult life in the community.

Since 2006, the rankings have enabled families, advocates, the media and policymakers to measure each state’s progress or lack of improvement and gain insight into how the highest-ranking states are achieving their success. An interactive website allows visitors to compare and contrast results among selected states and dig deeper into the data.

The report puts each State’s progress into a national context to help advocates and policymakers in their missions to improve life for people with disabilities and their families.

  • Advocates should use this information to educate other advocates, providers, families and individuals, policymakers and state administrations on areas needing improvement. The data can support policy reforms and frame debates about resource allocation. Advocates can also use the information to prioritize those areas that need immediate attention and support funding to maintain high quality outcomes, eliminate waiting lists and close large institutions.
  • Elected officials should use this report as a guide on which issues and States need time and attention and, possibly, more resources or more inclusive policies.
  • Federal and State administrations should use this report to put their work and accomplishments in context and to chart a course for the next focus area in the quest for continuous improvement and improved quality of life.

Stephen Bennett“Ultimately, the goal of all of this is to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for all Americans,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “UCP is committed to shining a light on how well states are actually serving people with disabilities and, by extension, their families and communities. Also, we want to provide the proper national context for this data so that we can truly use it to drive progress.”

 

How is your state doing? 

 

  1. All States still have room for improvement, but some States have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#47), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50) primarily due to the small portion of people and resources dedicated to those in small or home-like settings in these four states. Mississippi and Texas also do not participate in NCI.
  1. 32 States, down from 38, meet the 80/80 Home and Community Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community and 80 percent of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for home (less than 7 residents per setting) and community support. Those that do not meet the 80/80 standard are Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Virginia.
  1. As of 2013, 14 States report having no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Another 10 States have only one institution each (Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming). Since 1960, 220 of 354 state institutions have been closed (5 more in the past year alone), and 13 more are projected to close by 2016 in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey (3), New York (2), Oklahoma (2), Tennessee (2) and Virginia (2).
  2. For people with disabilities life should be without limits26 States, up from 18, now report meeting the 80 percent Home-Like Setting Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in settings such as their own home, a family home, family foster care or small group settings like shared apartments with fewer than four residents. The U.S. average for this standard is 79 percent. Just eight States meet a top-performing 90 percent Home-like Setting Standard: Arizona, California, Colorado, D.C., Hawaii, Nevada, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
  1. Ten States, up from seven last year, report at least 10 percent of individuals using self-directed services, according to the National Core Indicators survey in 29 States. These States include Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Utah and Virginia.
  1. 42 States, up from 39 last year, participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) survey, a comprehensive quality-assurance program that includes standard measurements to assess outcomes of services. A total of 29 States, a 50% increase from last year, reported data outcomes in 2014.
  1. Only 14 States report that they are supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). These support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together, and people with disabilities living in a community setting. These family-focused state programs were in Arizona, California, Delaware, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Alabama and Pennsylvania reported that they were providing higher levels of family support in last year’s ranking.
  1. Just 8 States, down from 10 last year, report having at least 33 percent of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment. These States include Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire (newly added), New Mexico, Oklahoma, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia (newly added). Louisiana, Nebraska, Oregon and Virginia reported that they met this threshold in last year’s ranking, but reported a decrease in competitive employment this year.
  1. 14 States report successfully placing at least 60 percent of individuals in vocational rehabilitation in jobs, with fifteen States reporting the average number of hours worked for those individuals placed being at least 25 hours. Three States report at least half of those served got a job within one year. Only California met the standard on all three success measures this year compared to last year’s ranking, when Nebraska and South Dakota were the only two states to report meeting all three thresholds.
  1. Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and show the unmet need. More than 322,000 people, 5,000 more than last year, are on a waiting list for Home and Community-Based Services. This requires a daunting 44 percent increase in States’ HCBS programs. 16 States, a decrease from 22 last year, report no waiting list or a small waiting list (requiring less than 10 percent program growth).

2013_donation_overlay_buttonYour support makes The Case for Inclusion possible each year. Make a gift today to help UCP continue to fulfill its mission of a Life Without Limits for people with disabilities and their families by providing advocacy, support and services. 

UCP Releases Case for Inclusion Rankings and Report

Arizona, Maryland, Missouri, New York & Hawaii Top 2015 List

 

Washington, D.C. (July 16, 2014) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2015 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report and interactive website used to track state-by-state community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

The Case for Inclusion examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, UCP is able to publish this comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

In addition to rankings, the report digs deeper into two critical issues facing people with disabilities and their families: waiting lists for services and support and transitioning from high school into an adult life in the community. Two case studies examine how states are approaching those issues.

Since 2006, the rankings have enabled families, advocates, the media and policymakers to measure each state’s progress or lack of improvement and gain insight into how the highest-ranking states are achieving their success. To enhance the usability of the report, UCP publishes tables of the data from which the report was compiled on an interactive website where visitors can compare and contrast results among selected states.

“Ultimately, the goal of all of this is to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for all Americans,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “UCP is committed to shining a light on how well states are actually serving people with disabilities and, by extension, their families and communities. Also, we want to provide the proper national context for this data so that we can truly use it to drive progress.”

To download and read the entire Case for Inclusion report or explore the data tables, visit cfi.ucp.org.

 

Significant Takeaways from the 2015 Ranking

Promoting Independence

  1. All States still have room for improvement, but some States have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#47), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50) primarily due to the small portion of people and resources dedicated to those in small or home-like settings in these four states. Mississippi and Texas also do not participate in NCI.
  1. 32 States, down from 38, meet the 80/80 Home and Community Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community and 80 percent of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for home (less than 7 residents per setting) and community support. Those that do not meet the 80/80 standard are Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Virginia.
  1. As of 2013, 14 States report having no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Another 10 States have only one institution each (Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming). Since 1960, 220 of 354 state institutions have been closed (5 more in the past year alone), according to the University of Minnesota’s Research and Training Center on Community Living. Another 13 more are projected to close by 2016 in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey (3), New York (2), Oklahoma (2), Tennessee (2) and Virginia (2)
  1. 26 States, up from 18, now report meeting the 80 percent Home-Like Setting Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in settings such as their own home, a family home, family foster care or small group settings like shared apartments with fewer than four residents. The U.S. average for this standard is 79 percent. Just eight States meet a top-performing 90 percent Home-like Setting Standard: Arizona, California, Colorado, D.C., Hawaii, Nevada, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
  1. Ten States, up from seven last year, report at least 10 percent of individuals using self-directed services, according to the National Core Indicators survey in 29 States. These States include Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Utah and Virginia.

Tracking Health, Safety and Quality of Life

  1. 42 States, up from 39 last year, participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) survey, a comprehensive quality-assurance program that includes standard measurements to assess outcomes of services. A total of 29 States, a 50% increase from last year, reported data outcomes in 2014.

Keeping Families Together

  1. Only 14 States report that they are supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). These support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together, and people with disabilities living in a community setting. These family-focused state programs were in Arizona, California, Delaware, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Alabama and Pennsylvania reported that they were providing higher levels of family support in last year’s ranking.

Promoting Productivity

  1. Just 8 States, down from 10 last year, report having at least 33 percent of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment. These States include Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire (newly added), New Mexico, Oklahoma, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia (newly added). Louisiana, Nebraska, Oregon and Virginia reported that they met this threshold in last year’s ranking, but reported a decrease in competitive employment this year.
  1. 14 States report successfully placing at least 60 percent of individuals in vocational rehabilitation in jobs, with fifteen States reporting the average number of hours worked for those individuals placed being at least 25 hours and three States reporting at least half of those served getting a job within one year. Only California met the standard on all three success measures this year compared to last year’s ranking, when Nebraska and South Dakota were the only two states to report meeting all three thresholds.

Serving Those in Need

  1. Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and show the unmet need. More than 322,000 people, 5,000 more than last year, are on a waiting list for Home and Community-Based Services. This requires a daunting 44 percent increase in States’ HCBS programs. 16 States, a decrease from 22 last year, report no waiting list or a small waiting list (requiring less than 10 percent program growth).

Disability Provider and Advocate Unveils New Public Education & Outreach Initiative, Celebrates Opening of New National Headquarters in DC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS:
Lauren Cozzi: 202-973-7114 (direct), LCozzi@ucp.org
Alicia Kubert Smith: 202-973-7168 (direct), AKubertSmith@ucp.org

Disability Provider and Advocate Unveils New Public Education & Outreach Initiative, Celebrates Opening of New National Headquarters in DC

Luncheon Forum Explores Issues of Transition

Washington, DC (Nov. 30, 2011) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP), an international service provider and advocate for children and adults with a spectrum of disabilities, unveiled its new Public Education & Outreach initiative and celebrated the opening of a new national headquarters in Washington, DCwith a luncheon forum exploring issues of transition for people with disabilities.

During the Luncheon Forum, co-hosted with Disability Power & Pride, a distinguished panel of speakers discussed key transition issues in the lives of people with disabilities, including the transition from early childhood to teen years, post-secondary education, employment, independent living and long-term care needs.

Watch the recorded video clips of the panel presentation from featured speakers:

  • Richard Donovan, CEO and principal owner of Integrated Process Solutions LLC (IPS)
  • Connie Garner, Policy Director in the Government Strategies Practice Group, and Executive Director for Advance CLASS, Inc.
  • Seth Harris, Deputy Secretary of Labor

 

“UCP affiliates provide key support for families and individuals across the globe during moments of transition in life,” said Stephen Bennett, former UCP President & Chief Executive Officer. “We are excited to add significant new national information and networking resources for people with disabilities through our new Public Education & Outreach initiatives and hope that these tools spark a national dialogue about ways we can all help create a life without limits for people with disabilities.”

Resources:

 

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

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Key Findings: The Post-High School Outcomes of Youth with Disabilities up to 6 Years after High School

A new report from the US Department of Education presents key findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). The study helps educators and policy makers develop an understanding of the experiences of secondary school students with disabilities nationally as they go through their early adult years. The report provides data on post secondary education, employment, wages, household circumstances, marital status, community engagement , and more.
 
Transition refers to the time when youth with disabilities leave the school system and continue on to adult life–college, vocational training, employment, and/or independent living. This is a time when many youths "fall through the cracks" and lose services and supports that enable them to lead an independent, productive life. Learn more about this topic on our Transition Page.

New Clinical Report on Supporting the Health Care Transition from Adolescence to Adulthood in the Medical Home

The new clinical report—Supporting the Health Care Transition from Adolescence to Adulthood in the Medical Home—appears in the July issue of Pediatrics. The report is jointly authored by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), and the American College of Physicians (ACP) and the provides practical, detailed guidance on how to plan and execute better health care transitions for all patients. The report follows an algorithmic format from age 12 through the transfer of care to an adult medical home.

Helping Youth Develop Skills for Job Success

The National Collaborative on Workplace and Disability for Youth released a new brief for parents and families that can help them better prepare their child with a disability for adult life. The brief, "Helping Youth Develop Soft Skills for Job Success: 
Tips for Parents and Families
" discusses the importance of "Soft Skills"–the every day, common sense skills that are important in all aspects of life. By improving these skills, a youth can enhance his or her social life, do better in postsecondary studies, and be more successful at finding and maintaining employment. Families can use several strategies to help develop soft skills. Read the full brief online.