UCP Releases 2016 Case for Inclusion Report

 

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For Inquiries: Kaitlyn Meuser, kmeuser@ucp.org, 202-973-7185

UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY RELEASES STATE RANKINGS ON SERVICES FOR AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

Arizona, Vermont, New Hampshire, Michigan & Hawaii Top 2016 List

Washington, D.C. (September 20, 2016) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2016 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report and interactive website used to track state-by-state community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

The Case for Inclusion examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, UCP is able to publish this comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

In addition to rankings, the report digs deeper into two critical issues facing people with disabilities and their families: waiting lists for services as well as support for the transition from high school into an adult life in the community. Two case studies examine how states are approaching those issues.

Since 2006, the rankings have enabled families, advocates, the media and policymakers to measure each state’s progress — or lack of improvement — and gain insight into how the highest-ranking states are achieving their success. To enhance the usability of the report, UCP publishes tables of the data from which the report was compiled on an interactive website where visitors can compare and contrast results among selected states.

“Ultimately, the goal of this research is to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for all Americans,” said Richard Forkosh, Interim President/CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “UCP is committed to shining a light on how well states are actually serving people with disabilities and, by extension, their families and communities. Also, we want to underscore the national context for this data so that stakeholders can use this information to drive progress.”

“For more than a decade, UCP has ranked states to showcase the good and to highlight what needs improvement. The fact is real progress is being made. More Americans with ID/DD are living in the community rather than being isolated in large state institutions. But much more work needs to be done to reduce waiting lists, increase employment and expand support to families. This annual ranking clearly shows the true picture of what’s happening and what should be happening in the states for our friends and neighbors with ID/DD,” stated Tarren Bragdon, the report’s author since 2006.

To download and read the entire Case for Inclusion report, or explore the data tables, visit cfi.ucp.org.

Significant Takeaways from the 2016 Rankings

Promoting Independence

1. All states still have room for improvement, but some states have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#47), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50) primarily due to the small portion of people and resources dedicated to those in small or home-like settings in these four states.

2. 32 states, same as last year, meet the 80/80 Home and Community Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community and 80 percent of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for home (less than 7 residents per setting) and community support. Those that do not meet the 80/80 standard are: Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Virginia. Connecticut is very close (with 79% spent on HCBS).

3. As of 2014, 15 states report having no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including: Alabama, Alaska, Colorado, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Another 9 States have only one institution each (Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming). Since 1960, 205 of 354 state institutions have been closed, according to the University of Minnesota’s Research and Training Center on Community Living.

4. 27 states, up from 26, now report meeting the 80 percent Home-Like Setting standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in settings such as their own home, a family home, family foster care or small group settings like shared apartments with fewer than four residents. The U.S. average for this standard is 80 percent. Just eleven (up from 8) States meet a top-performing 90 percent Home-like Setting standard: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, D.C., Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin.

5. Fifteen states, up from ten last year, report at least 10 percent of individuals using self-directed services, according to the National Core Indicators survey in 36 states. Five states report at least 20 percent being self-directed. These states include: Florida, Illinois, New Hampshire, Utah and Vermont.

Tracking Health, Safety and Quality of Life

6. 47 states, up from 42 last year, participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) survey, a comprehensive quality-assurance program that includes standard measurements to assess outcomes of services. A total of 36 states, up from 29 last year, reported data outcomes in 2015.

Keeping Families Together

7. Only 15 states, up from 14 last year, report that they are supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). These support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together, and people with disabilities living in a community setting. These family-focused state programs were in: Arizona, California, Delaware, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Promoting Productivity

8. 10 states, up from 8 last year, report having at least 33 percent of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment. These states include: Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia.

9. 15 states report successfully placing at least 60 percent of individuals in vocational rehabilitation in jobs, with nineteen states reporting the average number of hours worked for those individuals placed being at least 25 hours and four states reporting at least half of those served getting a job within one year. No states met the standard on all three success measures.

Serving Those in Need

10. Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and show the unmet need. Almost 350,000 people, 28,000 more than last year, are on a waiting list for Home and Community-Based Services. This requires a daunting 46 percent increase in States’ HCBS programs. 18 states, an increase from 16 last year, report no waiting list or a small waiting list (requiring less than 10 percent program growth).

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 70 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

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To view this press release in PDF format: click here.

LEADING DISABILITY GROUPS USE NEW MEDICAID REPORT FINDINGS & RESROURCES AS GUIDE IN ADVOCACY FOR PROGRESS, AGAINST FAILURES IN STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH ID/DD

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

Kaelan Richards, UCP: 202-973-7175,

Lara Schwartz, AAPD: 202-521-4309, lschwartz@aapd.com

LEADING DISABILITY GROUPS USE NEW MEDICAID REPORT FINDINGS & RESOURCES AS GUIDE IN ADVOCACY FOR PROGRESS, AGAINST FAILURES IN STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH ID/DD

 

 

 

The Case for Inclusion should be used a tool to determine how to build state support and service systems that work for Americans with intellectual and development disabilities

Washington, DC (May 23, 2012) – While progress has been made and there is more quality assurance of services provided, some states are failing to adequately serve Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), according to The Case for Inclusion 2012, a new Medicaid report released today. United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) and the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) are calling on advocates to use The Case for Inclusion as a tool to determine how to build state support and service systems that work for people. The findings for 2012 reveal that:

  1. While progress has been made, there is room for improvement: 36 states can now show that 80% of the individuals with ID/DD in their states are served in the community;

     

  2. States are becoming more involved in ensuring the quality of the services they provide: 29 states have established a comprehensive quality assurance program to measure the outcomes of the community services they deliver;

     

  3. But there is still more to do, particularly in providing services: waiting lists for critical community services continue to climb with more than a quarter of a million, or 268,000, people with ID/DD.

 

The 2012 report tracks the progress of community living standards, and it shows that the states with the best services and supports for Americans living with disabilities are Arizona, Michigan and California. The lowest performing states are Arkansas, Texas and Mississippi, which have remained at the bottom of the rankings since The Case for Inclusion was first published in 2006.

While many states appear to be financially stable, the coming intersection of an aging population, people living with disabilities, and limited financial resources, will have a significant impact on the country’s entitlement programs.

The report examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, the findings develop a comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

Since 2006, these rankings enable families, advocates, the media and policymakers to fully understand each state’s progress or lack of improvement, and help to protect successful efforts against unwise funding cuts, as well as guide future reforms to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for these, and ultimately all, Americans.

“Each year, UCP publishes The Case for Inclusion as part of its continuing efforts to advocate for civil rights protections and public policies that provide support for individuals living with disabilities, ensuring fair and full citizenship for all Americans,” said former UCP President & CEO, Stephen Bennett. “The Case for Inclusion clearly identifies the states that are successful in providing the supports and services that people living with disabilities need, as well as states that are struggling. I urge all states and advocates to utilize The Case for Inclusion as a tool to strengthen their efforts, and to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities.”

“It is critical that states honor their obligations to people with disabilities by providing comprehensive and high-quality services through their Medicaid programs. That is why people with disabilities and our allies are fighting to preserve and improve Medicaid at the state and federal levels. The Case for Inclusion makes clear that some states are falling short and provides a roadmap for advocacy. AAPD encourages our community, members, and supporters to use this tool in our continued efforts to preserve the vital services and supports that enable eight million people with disabilities to live the lives we deserve,” said AAPD President and CEO Mark Perriello.

Online features, reports and data:

The 2012 report and data from all previous reports is available on UCP’s website using a robust new web module and design at ucp.org/public-policy/the-case-for-inclusion. Users can:

  • Compare state & national data
  • View state scorecards
  • Interact with the ranking map
  • See highlights of the 2012 report, top and bottom 10 states, most improved states and those with biggest drops, and  facts about the best performing states
  • Advocate for areas needing improvement in states, and promote achievements that maintain high quality outcomes, like eliminating waiting lists and closing large institutions
  • Download the full 2012 report and previous reports

 

Users can pull individual state outcomes and measures, track each state’s performance over time, and compare states among one another and to the US average. The Case for Inclusion data, tables and graphs are exportable and printable as needed for personal and professional use.

For further detail about the report itself, there will be a press briefing at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT). Author Tarren Bragdon will provide insight into the rankings and data, which advocacy groups and individuals can use to raise awareness for key outcomes for people with disabilities.

  • Toll-free: 1-888-450-5996
  • Participant passcode: 786597

 

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About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

 

About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)

The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), the country’s largest cross-disability membership association, organizes the disability community to be a powerful force for change – politically, economically, and socially. AAPD was founded in 1995 to help unite the diverse community of people with disabilities, including their family, friends and supporters, and to be a national voice for change in implementing the goals of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). To learn more, visit the AAPD Web site: www.aapd.com.

Press Briefing Wed. 1:00 p.m. EDT: UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

MEDIA ADVISORY: Press briefing

CONTACT: 

Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

The Case for Inclusion analyzes and ranks states on services for Americans with intellectual and development disabilities

Washington, DC (May 22, 2012)United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) will release The Case for Inclusion and host a press briefing with the author on  Wednesday, May 23 at 1:00 p.m. ET. This annual report tracks the progress of community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). Author Tarren Bragdon will provide insight into the rankings and data, which advocacy groups and individuals can use to raise awareness for key outcomes for people with disabilities.

WHO:            UCP

WHAT:          Press briefing with The Case for Inclusion author, Tarren Bragdon

WHEN:         1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT)

WHERE:       Toll-free: 1-888-450-5996

                       Participant passcode: 786597

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About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

United Cerebral Palsy Report Finds Progress in Medicaid Services but Nearly 33,000 Americans with ID/DD Still In 162 Large, State-Run Institutions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY REPORT FINDS PROGRESS IN MEDICAID SERVICES BUT NEARLY 33,000 AMERICANS WITH ID/DD STILL LIVE IN 162 LARGE, STATE-RUN INSTITUTIONS

UCP’s 6th Annual The Case for Inclusion Ranks 50 States & DC on
Medicaid Services for Individuals with Disabilities

Washington, DC (April 28, 2011) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP), a leading service provider and advocate for children and adults with a spectrum of disabilities, today released The Case for Inclusion, an annual ranking of all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) for Medicaid services provided to intellectual and developmental disability (ID/DD) populations.

 

The sixth annual rankings reveal:

  1. All states have room to improve outcomes and services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and must be particularly vigilant in the current economic climate (p. 5);
  2. Too many Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities still do not live in the community (57,982 people with ID/DD live in facilities with 16 or more beds), although real and notable progress have been made over the last year (p. 5);
  3. Certain states are making substantial progress toward inclusion (p. 6);
  4. Too much money is still spent isolating people in large institutions (nearly 33,000 people at an average cost of $539 per person per day), with nominal change from last year (p. 6); and
  5. Waiting lists have increased dramatically overall (up 56% from 2005 to 2009), but performance is quite mixed by state. Most states are not serving all those in need (p. 6).

 

“It is very encouraging that The 2011 Case for Inclusion reveals notable progress since the 2010 report. However each of the states and DC have room for improvement, because too many Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities still do not live in the community. UCP commends those making substantial progress toward inclusion and will continue using this report as a resource in the civil rights movement for people with disabilities, a movement that is far from over. Advocates, including leaders in each state, can use the 2011 report to advocate for all people with disabilities,” said Stephen Bennett, former United Cerebral Palsy President & Chief Executive Officer.

Top 10 states in terms of quality of Medicaid service provided:

  1. Vermont
  2. Arizona
  3. Michigan
  4. New Hampshire
  5. California
  6. Washington
  7. Delaware
  8. Nevada
  9. Massachusetts
  10. Connecticut

 

Bottom 10 states in terms of quality of Medicaid service provided:

  1. Indiana
  2. North Carolina
  3. Utah
  4. Oklahoma
  5. Nebraska
  6. District of Columbia
  7. Illinois
  8. Texas
  9. Arkansas
  10. Mississippi

 

Thirteen states shifted by at least eight places in the rankings from 2007 to 2011.

Highlights:

  • An impressive 21 states – down one since last year, but up two from 2009 and an increase from 16 states in 2007 – have more than 80 percent of those served living in home-like settings (p. 5).
  • From 2005 to 2009, an impressive 18 states – up six from last year – reduced the number of Americans living in large institutions by 20 percent or more (p. 6).
  • Nationally, the 14.4 percent (down from 19 percent in four years) of those living in institutions consume 33.7 percent (down from 41.4 percent in four years) of all Medicaid funding on those with intellectual and developmental disabilities (p. 6).
  • Although nearly 60 points separate the top performing state from the poorest performing state, eight points separate the top 10 states, 15 points separate the top 25 states and only 15 points separate the middle 25 states. Therefore, minor changes in state policy or outcomes could significantly affect how a state ranks on future or past The Case for Inclusion reports (p. 7).

 

About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

About Author
Tarren Bragdon has been involved in healthcare policy research and analysis for over a decade. His work has been featured in newspapers and media outlets nationwide including The Wall Street Journal, New York Post, New York Sun and PBS. He served two terms in the Maine House of Representatives on the Health and Human Services Committee and served as chair of the board of directors of Spurwink Services, one of the largest social service providers in Maine.

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CONTACTS:

Lauren Cozzi: 202-973-7114 (direct), LCozzi@ucp.org

Alicia Kubert Smith: 202-973-7168, akubertsmith@ucp.org