#KnowMedicaid

 

As Google search results indicate, many more Americans have grown concerned about losing their (or a family member’s) Medicaid benefit. We at UCP are receiving an increasing number of inquiries about Medicaid and the services and supports it provides for many individuals with disabilities and their families.

 

Even without a pending health care bill in Congress, it can be overwhelming to navigate the process of accessing the funding and benefits necessary to receive the support needed so you or your loved one can live a life without limits. While there is no one way to simplify the process, there are ways to make it a bit easier. The tips and tricks below will help you in your conversations with Medicaid and other agencies.

 

When you’re done checking out our tips, you will also find a PDF guide with the contact information for Medicaid (and related agencies in all 50 states) at the bottom of this post.

 

Keep Records of All Conversations, and Be Sure to Seek Clarification When Necessary:

 

Whenever calling your state or any other entity) regarding services and supports, be sure to keep notes about your conversation including: who you speak with , what department they are in, what department they refer you to, and any other pertinent details.

 

This is really important in the case that there is any confusion or conflicting information during the process , because you will be able to provide past information about what you were told and when.

 

It is also a great idea to ask the person you are speaking to to follow up with an email, if possible; that way you are able to see their summary of the conversation, and open up a dialogue that may help in the future should there be any misunderstandings.

 

Remember That State and Federal Agencies Are Not Identical:

 

When working with Medicaid, or any other government program or agency, it is important to be aware of the difference between the agency in your state, and the federal agencies in Washington, DC.

 

While agencies can be connected, the state agency handles state programs and issues and the federal agency counterpart handles national ones. When getting information about services and supports, it is vital to differentiate between what is available and provided by your state, and what might also be available on the national level.

 

This is also key because these differences affect how programs are funded, and may alter the process required to become eligible. Sometimes programs may be jointly run on the state and national level, but it is still important to be aware of when you’re talking to, or about, your individual state versus when you’re looking at things on a national level.

 

Not All States Run Programs the Same Way, (or a Call Agencies by the Same Name):

 

Another reason it is important to be aware of the difference between state and federal programming is because the way programs, such as Medicaid, are administered can vary significantly from state to state.

 

Therefore, be sure to investigate how things are run in your specific state, and not go off of the experiences of an individual who may live someplace else. A program that is provided through the Department of Health and Human Services in one state may be provided through the Department of Welfare in another.

 

Before getting discouraged and thinking something doesn’t exist, always remember to try a different name or department, because you never know what it might fall under in your state.

 

Always Ask for Other Options:

 

Just because one program, grant, or service is not an option for you, doesn’t mean there isn’t something out there that can help with your situation. Even if you find out that the program you are looking into will not work (or be available) based on for your situation,, be sure to ask the person you’re speaking with if they know of any other programs that may be able to help.

 

When considering your options, it is also important to remember that different programs have different eligibility requirements. So, be sure to provide as much information as possible to determine if you are eligible for a specific program.

 

Obtaining services through Medicaid (or other agencies) is rarely a simple process, but we hope that these tips– as well as our guide of various state offices involved in the administration of services and supports for individuals with disabilities– will make your journey a bit easier.
Do you have any other tips or tricks you would like to add to the list? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter using the hashtag #KnowMedicaid. To learn more about Medicaid in your state, check out our resource guide.

National Disability Voter Registration Week

Compared to other highly-developed nations around the world, the United States has about 20%-30% fewer registered voters of citizens who are legally eligible to vote. This number might not seem like a lot. However, the importance of voting cannot be minimized, especially for people with disabilities. That is why next week, July 17th through the 21st, is National Disability Voter Registration Week.

Voting gives citizens a voice in their local, state, and federal-level politics. As a constituent, their voice can make a difference. The greater the turnout, the more truly representative our government becomes. This is because voting empowers citizens to communicate their opinions and have the opportunity to influence all levels of government.

While the 19th Amendment and the Voting Rights Act secured voting rights for many historically disadvantaged voters, the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990 established the requirement of polling centers to have features that make voting areas accessible for citizens with disabilities. More recently, the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA), includes a provision that aims to further ensure that polling places as well as the registration process are universally accessible, whether accessed online or in person. HAVA also ensures that balloting equipment is accessible to everyone, and directs election administrators to train those who work at the polls on how to adequately and efficiently assist voters.

But, why is voting so crucial? It gives citizens a chance to express how they feel about a variety of issues. Whether it is a social issue, or a matter concerning the economy, casting a vote communicates constituents’ priorities to their elected representatives. Accordingly, representatives vote on legislation that matters to their constituents. Essentially, a democracy does not exist without the vote of the people.

Most people believe that the presidential election is the most important election to vote in. Despite that, votes can greatly influence politics at a state and especially at a local level. State and local policy issues are also usually the ones that impact us the most as a community.

As important as it is to vote, one must register first. Registering is a process that is simple for many, but accessibility is still too often a barrier for people with disabilities. The week of July 17-21 is National Disability Voter Registration Week 2017. To learn more and to host a voter registration event, find more information here.

The Disability Integration Act (DIA) of 2017

It has been nearly 20 years since the Supreme Court ruled that individuals with disabilities have the right to live in the community, but even today, not all people with disabilities in the United States are given that meaningful option.

A new bill, The Disability Integration Act (DIA) of 2017, was introduced by Senator Charles “Chuck” Schumer (D-NY) in the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee to combat this issue. This bill would ensure that states are providing long-term services and support (LTSS) to individuals with disabilities In community-based settings, such as the individual’s own home. It also further enforces the American with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) mandate on integration.

Alongside the ADA, court cases, such as Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), have set the precedent for this legislation. The Olmstead ruling states that under the ADA, if placement in a community-based setting is appropriate, and the individual would prefer to live there, the state must comply with their wishes and fulfill those accommodations as those are their civil rights. The Disability Integration Act would help to make certain that every state is securing these rights in a timely manner, and that states are upholding the many details of this ruling.

The Olmstead ruling clarifies that “institutionalization is unjustified when:”

Supporters of the DIA legislation seek to provide a life that is as independent as possible for those individuals who can “handle and benefit” from the choice of living in a community-based living situation. This would allow individuals with a disability to have access to their greater community and have the opportunity to participate in economic, social, and educational advancement. 

The most frequent options for living independently are based on benefits provided by Medicaid. The funds provided to individuals through Medicaid afford individuals the ability to pay for their community-based services, such as personal care assistants, without having to worry about how they are going to pay for housing, utilities, or other additional necessities.

The DIA bill would further reinforce the integration mandate under the ADA, by ensuring that every individual that qualifies for LTSS has a “federally protected right” to become integrated into an community, and would create an extensive “state planning requirement” that imposes objectives to help transition individuals out of institutions. Furthermore, there is a requirement for states to annually publish a public report about the number of individuals with disabilities who continue to be served in institutions versus in their communities, as well as the number of individuals who have made the transition.

 

To learn more about the Disability Integration Act and other public policy topics, and to get more involved, check out our public policy resources.

United Cerebral Palsy and the National Council on Disability Coming Together for “First Responders and Disability”

UCP-NCD2United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) and the National Council on Disability (NCD) are coming together to host a day long convening on December 9th, 2016, focusing on First Responders and the Disability Community. The discussion will center on first responder reform and the impact on the disability community.

The purpose of this discussion is to gather information and resources to inform NCD’s 2017 policy project focusing on how to transform the policies and practice around First Responders engagement with the disability community. This conversation will include experts in criminal justice reform, disability rights advocates, policymakers, law enforcement organizations, and individuals impacted by state violence directly.

Please join us from 9:30 am to 2:30 pm EST in person or tune in to the live stream.

For more information, including how to RSVP: Please click here.

See the program agenda here.

Read Speaker Bios here.

Senate Passes National Family Caregiver Support Program

Earlier this week, the Senate passed the Older Americans Act (OAA). This bill contains the eligibility fix for the national family caregiver support program that will now include older relative caregivers (aged 55 and over) of their adult children with disabilities (aged 18-59).

The National Family Caregiver Support Program was the first federal program to recognize the needs of the nation’s family caregivers who provide the vast majority of long-term services and supports. This program not only funds respite, but individual counseling, support groups, and caregiver training for family caregivers, primarily for those who are caring for the aging population.iStock_000013039002Small

With the increasing number of Americans who are caregivers of their adult children with disabilities, we are thrilled to see this improvement in the program. There are over 800,000 caregivers of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) who are over the age of 60. This number is projected to grow substantially with the aging of the “baby boomer” generation. People with intellectual and developmental disabilities are also living longer due to medical advances. As parents of these individuals age, they will require more support to be able to continue providing care to their adult children and avoiding costly and unwanted institutional placement.

More than at any other time, when Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security are being threatened, helping family caregivers to continue providing long-term services and supports is good public policy.

The National Family Caregiver Support Program and the Older Americans Act have been on our radar as they have direct impact for improving and securing a life with out limits for those living with disabilities and their families.

Call Your Member of Congress and tell them how thankful you are for the passage of the National Family Caregiver Support Program and the Older Americans Act!

To help guide your call, we have put together a list of talking points.

 

 

Legislative Update: January 2016

As we roll into the New Year, we wanted to update you quickly on a few policy issues that wrapped up in the end of the year and will be on our radar throughout 2016: 

 

Caregiving and Respite Care

The issue of caregiving, and providing resources and supports to those who receive and those who provide care is an issue we will continue to invest and pay attention to through iStock_000012685951XSmall2016. To end the year, Congress showed support for Respite Care and Caregiving by passing the Lifespan Respite Care Act  and providing increased funding for the National Caregiver Support Program. Included in the end of the year bill passed to fund the Federal Government was a provision that increased funding for the National Caregiver Support Program by $5 million and Lifespan Respite received an additional $1 million! This is real movement for supporting family caregivers.  In the next months we’ll update you on what’s next for caregiving policy and programs and what you can do to help ensure these programs continue to grow. 

 

Education

In December, Congress passed and the President signed Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which goes farther to assist students with disabilities, then No Child Left Behind did.  The new bill incorporates data and new knowledge about how to most effectively teach students with disabilities so they can successfully graduate and become post high school career/college ready. It also ensures accommodations for assessments for students with disabilities; requires local education agencies to provide evidence-based interventions in schools with consistently underperforming subgroups (including students with disabilities), requires states to address how they improve conditions for learning including reducing incidents of bullying and harassment and overuse of discipline practices and reduce the use of aversive behavioral interventions (such as restraints and seclusion). Moreover, this new legislation significantly shifts authority to make very important education decision to the states and school districts. Throughout 2015, UCP participated in meetings, signed letters of support and worked with stakeholders to ensure the bill would strengthen provisions to ensure that all students have the opportunity to receive a quality education.  This bill is one we do support.  Now, over the course of 2016, we will be updating and reaching out to you to ensure that state level practices being put forward reflect what is best for those living with and impacted disabilities.  

 

Complex Rehabilitation Technology

Coverage and reimbursement for Complex Rehabilitation Technologies is an issue that we’ve been working with you, and with others here in D.C. on for the past year.  Specifically, we have been concerned about the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid implementing a provision to restrict access to complex and critical wheelchair components and accessories. The provision was set to go into effect on January 1, 2016.  In a show of support for access to these critical technologies — Congress included in S. 2425, the “Patient Access and Medicare Protection Act” a one-year delay preventing CMS from implementing this restrictive provision!  

While Congress did not include a permanent fix for the problem this one-year delay provides UCP, along with others in the community, the opportunity in 2016 to further our work on the wheelchair accessories issue and in establishing needed improvements overall for reimbursement of complex rehabilitation technology within Medicare and other health insurance programs. We will continue to update and talk to you over the course of the year on how to engage on this important issue!

 

Workforce

In the next few weeks, each of the 50 states will be releasing their Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act plans for public review and comment. Last year, a new law called the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was passed. This new law is vital for the 1-in-5 Americans who have a disability, as it requires the entire workforce system to become accessible for people with disabilities.

Every state must create a Unified Integrated State Workforce Plan before March 2016. Once a state has completed their plan, they must publish it online. There is an opportunity for organizations to review their state plan and for public comment about the ways each respected plan can help people enter the workforce. This means a state plan that will be inclusive of the most integrated job opportunities for people with disabilities.

 

We are working with others in the community to create tools and guidance for our affiliates and individuals to submit comments and will circulate in the coming weeks.

 

March is National Developmental Disability Awareness Month

March is National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month. We will be collaborating with other disability organizations to promote a social media campaign to highlight the many ways in which people with and without developmental disabilities come together to form strong, diverse communities. The goal will be to raise awareness about the inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all facets of community life, as well as awareness to the barriers that people with disabilities still face in connecting to the communities in which they live.

Stay tuned for more information, including dates for webinars on how to become involved, tools for posting on social media and more information on how to engage and leverage this campaign!

The Pope, A New Speaker and a Budget: What’s Going on in Washington Right Now

It has been an exciting few weeks here in Washington, D.C.  It started with the city in celebration mode to host the pope and ended with the Speaker of the House resigning and the House and Senate passing a short-term continuing resolution (CR) that avoided a government shutdown.iStock_000012685951XSmall

While the CR is only short-term it was necessary as Congress has yet to pass any of the 12 annual appropriations bills and send them to the president’s desk.  As is the CR will continue to fund the government at fiscal year 2015 levels through December 11, 2015.

The current CR means that funding for programs and agencies important to the disability community, including the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention remain intact.

However, the looming December deadline still presents many reasons for us to remain watchful.  In addition to carving out a larger and longer-term budget agreement that must address across the board cuts and extend past the 2016 elections, Congress must also address hitting the federal debt ceiling.   

As for the new speaker of the house, it is likely to be Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).  However, many members are running for the other key positions in the leadership.  What is clear is that no matter who is nominated, they will surely have a full plate to deal with.

Here at UCP, we will continue to monitor the discussions and update you as the process proceeds.

 

Disability Policy Seminar Brings Advocates to Capitol Hill

Capitol

 

 

 

 

 

 

Almost 700 disability advocates gathered at The Renaissance Hotel in downtown Washington, D.C.April 13-15 for the annual Disability Policy Seminar. Co-hosted each year by UCP, The Arc, SABE, AAIDD, AUCD and NACDD, this event brings together advocates, policy experts and people with disabilities and their families on Capitol Hill to discuss current policy issues important to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and to advocate for top priority policies by going directly to their representatives in Congress.

Take a peek at the event courtesy of photos from AUCD at https://www.flickr.com/photos/aucd.

Visit disabilitypolicyseminar.org for more general information about the event and to plan for next year.

 

Press Briefing Wed. 1:00 p.m. EDT: UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

MEDIA ADVISORY: Press briefing

CONTACT: 

Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

The Case for Inclusion analyzes and ranks states on services for Americans with intellectual and development disabilities

Washington, DC (May 22, 2012)United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) will release The Case for Inclusion and host a press briefing with the author on  Wednesday, May 23 at 1:00 p.m. ET. This annual report tracks the progress of community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). Author Tarren Bragdon will provide insight into the rankings and data, which advocacy groups and individuals can use to raise awareness for key outcomes for people with disabilities.

WHO:            UCP

WHAT:          Press briefing with The Case for Inclusion author, Tarren Bragdon

WHEN:         1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT)

WHERE:       Toll-free: 1-888-450-5996

                       Participant passcode: 786597

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About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

LONG-TERM CARE PROGRAM SHOULD BE IMPROVED, NOT SCRAPPED

LONG-TERM CARE PROGRAM SHOULD BE IMPROVED, NOT SCRAPPED

Congress and Administration Should Make Adjustments to Make Program Financially Sound

Washington, DC (October 27, 2011) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) and The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) oppose efforts in Congress to repeal the CLASS Act (the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports Act).  At a hearing yesterday the Assistant Secretary for Aging Kathy Greenlee committed to providing Congress with information on the changes in the CLASS Act law that would enable the Administration to design a program that would be financially sound. UCP and AAPD call upon Congress and the Administration to get to work and make the CLASS Act’s benefits available to the millions of people who need them.

“President Obama should veto any legislation that would repeal the CLASS Act. Instead, the President should urge Congress to make it work. Scrapping the program would be unacceptable. America has a long-term care crisis that we must solve. The CLASS program would make long-term care insurance accessible. Without it, millions of Americans will be unable to afford care they need,” said Mark Perriello, President of the American Association of People with Disabilities.

We should strengthen, not weaken, our country’s safety net. People with disabilities are already struggling. Many states are cutting back Medicaid benefits and it will get much worse if Congress slashes Medicaid funding in the name of deficit reduction,” said Stephen Bennett, former President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
“The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation’s largest cross-disability organization. We promote equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. Our members, including people with disabilities and our family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change.” Visit www.AAPD.com for more information.

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