UCP ON NEW DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

UCP ON NEW DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULE

Washington, DC (September 20, 2013) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the following statement in response to a final rule from the U.S. Department of Labor aimed at tightening the Fair Labor Standards Act by significantly narrowing the “companionship exemption” to give nationwide minimum wage and overtime protections for in-home, direct support caregivers.

“While we understand that the new rule from the Department of Labor is intended to ensure that direct support caregivers are being compensated fairly for their work, there are serious potential consequences to these changes for individuals with disabilities.  Many of the services that these caregivers provide are reimbursed by Medicaid—which in many states does not allow for overtime.  This new rule may limit the services and supports that can be provided to individuals with disabilities living in the community, and ultimately result in more people with disabilities winding up in costly institutions,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “To avoid this unintended outcome, it is imperative that state Medicaid agencies take advantage of the delayed implementation of this rule to set reimbursement rates that will enable organizations like UCP to continue the in-home, community services and supports that people with disabilities need.”

# # #

About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

UCP RELEASES NEW REPORT ON STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

 

UCP RELEASES NEW REPORT ON STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

New format highlights states’ successes with managed care and employment initiatives

Washington, DC (May 2, 2013) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2013 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report that tracks the progress of community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

The 2013 report, in addition to data from all previous reports since 2006, is available on UCP’s website using a robust new web module and design at http://www.ucp.org/the-case-for-inclusion/2013/.

Each state and the District of Columbia (DC) is analyzed and ranked based on five key outcome areas: promoting independence, tracking quality and safety, keeping families together, promoting productivity, and reaching those in need. Since 2006, these rankings enable families, advocates, the media and policymakers to fully understand each state’s progress or lack of improvement, and help to protect programs and services against unwise funding cuts, as well as guide future reforms to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for these, and ultimately all, Americans.

This year’s report highlights the progress that has been made, including:

·      38 states now meet the 80/80 Community standard, a dramatic increase from just 14 states in the 2007 report.

·      As of 2011, 13 states have no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD. 10 states have only one institution each.

·      Since 1960, 209 of 354 state institutions have been closed, leaving just 149 remaining.

·      21 states now meet the 80% Home-like Setting standard (80% in settings with 1-3 residents).  This is up from just 17 states in the 2007 report.

·      34 states participate in the National Core Indicators, an increase from 24 in the 2007 report. 

·      15 states were supporting a large share of families through family support, up from just 10 states in the 2007 report.

The report also identifies problems, such as:

·      All states still have room for improvement, but some states have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, Arkansas (#50), Illinois (#48), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#49).

·      Just ten states have at least one-third (33%) of individuals in competitive employment. This is a downturn from 2007, when 17 states met this standard.

·      Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and have grown from 138,000 people in 2007 to 268,000. At this level, a growth of 44 percent would be needed to meet the need for services. 

New in the 2013 Case for Inclusion is highlights of three case studies—two that examine trends in managed care for those with ID/DD with reforms in Kansas and Massachusetts, and one outlining the success of Washington State in promoting competitive employment through its Employment First policy and practices.

Kansas:

·      KanCare represents one of the most aggressive and comprehensive Medicaid reforms affecting those with ID/DD, directly integrating work, health and community; broadening the scope of benefits; and prioritizing competitive employment and improving health outcomes.

·      As of January 1, 2014, individuals with ID/DD will be able to chose from the three private plans currently offered to Medicaid enrollees, all of which fully integrate medical and behavioral health benefits and home and community-based services.

·      KanCare will focus on specific outcomes to determine success, including: increased competitive employment; improved life expectancy; integration of physical health, behavioral health and home and community based services; and improved health.

Massachusetts:

·      The first state to implement a statewide pilot program (called a demonstration) for all dually eligible individuals, including those with ID/DD, Massachusetts aims to improve coordination of care, actual health outcomes, and overall quality of life for Americans with developmental disabilities.

·      Individuals with ID/DD will have new benefits available through the ICO plans, including restorative dental services, expanded personal care assistance, and greater access to durable medical equipment, and the program defines its success on actual outcomes.

·      Although the actual outcomes tracked have yet to be determined, some of the possible measures to be included include access, person-centered care, integration of services and enrollee outcomes.

Washington:

·      Washington State’s Employment First policy supports employment and day program funds targeted for working-age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the individual may choose community access programs.

·      By focusing its efforts on this narrow window of time, Washington’s leaders and advocates addressed the difficult goal of finding a job directly through leadership, training and innovation, and clearly defined goals.

·      The impact of this was profound: in seven years, the number of individuals competitively employed rose from 4,440 in 2004 (before the policy) to 5,562 by 2011.

“The Case for Inclusion is a valuable tool for United Cerebral Palsy and advocates across the country to use as we work to advance the civil rights protections and public policies that help support individuals living with disabilities, ensuring fair and full citizenship for all Americans. This year’s report shows in great detail the states are able to provide services and supports that result in better outcomes for people with disabilities, as well as three case studies that can serve as road maps to success,” said Stephen Bennett, President & CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “It is our hope that the Case for Inclusion can be used to strengthen the efforts of states and advocates to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities.”

Using the interactive website, users can:

·      Compare state & national data. 

·      View state scorecards. 

·      Interact with the ranking map. 

·      See highlights of the 2013 report, the top and bottom 10 states, most improved states and those with biggest drops, and facts about the best performing states. 

·      Learn how to use the report to advocate for areas needing improvement in states, and promote achievements that maintain high quality outcomes, like eliminating waiting lists and closing large institutions. 

·      View in-depth information about each of the states feature in the case studies: Massachusetts, Kansas and Washington State. 

·      Users can pull individual state outcomes and measures, track each state’s performance over time, and compare states among one another and to the U.S. average. The Case for Inclusion data, tables and graphs are exportable and printable as needed for personal and professional use.

# # # 

About United Cerebral Palsy

 

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org. 

Sequestration and its Effects on Special Populations

Overview

On March 1, 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB will sequester approximately $85 billion in Fiscal Year 2013 spending as mandated by the Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011.

OMB recently calculated that sequestration will require an annual reduction of roughly 5 percent for nondefense programs and roughly 8 percent for defense programs. However, given that these cuts must be achieved over only seven months instead of 12, the effective percentage reductions will be approximately 9 percent for nondefense programs and 13 percent for defense programs. These large and arbitrary cuts will have severe impacts across the government.

This overview on sequestration and its effects on special populations includes information related to: Medicaid, Social Security, and CHIP programs; Medicare; the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); Education and Special education (IDEA); the Head Start Program; and Housing.

National Implications

Medicaid, Social Security, and CHIP: While Medicaid, Social Security, and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) are exempt from the talks, most other health programs will be affected.

While Social Security payments are not affected, sequestration would force the Social Security Administration (SSA) to furlough most of their workforce, causing SSA offices to close earlier or permanently. Beneficiaries who visit these offices or call the 1-800 number will most likely have to wait longer for services. The furlough would also impact the ability of disability claims, retirement claims, and disability hearings to be processed.

Medicare: The sequester includes a two percent cut to Medicare, as well as much larger cuts to federal healthcare agencies. The Medicare cut is big — $11 billion just this year, according to the White House budget office. These cuts will affect those who receive Medicare, including Dual Eligible’s (those who receive both Medicare and Medicaid).

This would also result in billions of dollars in lost revenues to Medicare doctors, hospitals, and other providers, who will only be reimbursed at 98 cents on the dollar for their services to Medicare beneficiaries.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): Sequestration would reduce access to behavioral healthcare. If sequestration takes effect, up to 373,000 seriously mentally ill adults and seriously emotionally disturbed children could go untreated. This would likely lead to increased hospitalizations, involvement in the criminal justice system, and homelessness for these individuals.

In addition, close to 8,900 homeless persons with serious mental illness would not get outreach, treatment, housing, and support they need through the Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program. Admissions to inpatient facilities for people in need of critical addiction services could be reduced by 109,000, and almost 91,000 fewer people could receive substance abuse treatment services.

Education and Special education (IDEA):

Title I: Title I education funds would be eliminated for more than 2,700 schools, cutting support for nearly 1.2 million disadvantaged students. This funding reduction would put the jobs of approximately 10,000 teachers and aides at risk. Students would lose access to individual instruction, afterschool programs, and other interventions that help close achievement gaps.

Special Education (IDEA): Cuts to special education funding would eliminate Federal support for more than 7,200 teachers, aides, and other staff who provide essential instruction and support to preschool and school-aged students with disabilities.

Head Start: Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 70,000 children, reducing access to critical early education. Community and faith based organizations, small businesses, local governments, and school systems would have to lay off over 14,000 teachers, teacher assistants, and other staff.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): Under sequestration, HUD would not renew about 125,000 Tenant Based Rental Assistance vouchers (Section 8). This would affect over 300,000 individuals across the country. Half of Section 8 households have children, 40 percent are disabled, and 20 percent are elderly.

UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY RESPONDS TO FISCAL CLIFF VOTE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY RESPONDS TO FISCAL CLIFF VOTE

Washington, DC (January 2, 2012) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) issued the following statement in response to the passage by Congress of legislation to avert the so-called ‘fiscal cliff’ of tax increases and spending cuts.

“We applaud Congress’s action to prevent harmful tax increases and cuts to vital services and supports for millions of Americans. The deal passed by Congress protects Social Security benefits and Medicaid— but most importantly, the individuals and their families who depend on these safety net programs, and particularly those living with disabilities.

“However, we are very disappointed that the CLASS Act, which offered a framework for funding long-term services and supports, was repealed in the ‘fiscal cliff’ legislation. We are hopeful that the replacement Commission that was created in its place will be successful in helping our country to address these critical issues.

“United Cerebral Palsy urges Congress and President Obama to continue to work together to ensure that the programs and services that help so many Americans with disabilities and their families are protected in our ongoing budget debates.”

# # #

About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

LEADING DISABILITY GROUPS USE NEW MEDICAID REPORT FINDINGS & RESROURCES AS GUIDE IN ADVOCACY FOR PROGRESS, AGAINST FAILURES IN STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH ID/DD

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: 

Kaelan Richards, UCP: 202-973-7175,

Lara Schwartz, AAPD: 202-521-4309, lschwartz@aapd.com

LEADING DISABILITY GROUPS USE NEW MEDICAID REPORT FINDINGS & RESOURCES AS GUIDE IN ADVOCACY FOR PROGRESS, AGAINST FAILURES IN STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH ID/DD


The Case for Inclusion should be used a tool to determine how to build state support and service systems that work for Americans with intellectual and development disabilities                                                                                            

Washington, DC (May 23, 2012) – While progress has been made and there is more quality assurance of services provided, some states are failing to adequately serve Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), according to The Case for Inclusion 2012, a new Medicaid report released today. United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) and the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) are calling on advocates to use The Case for Inclusion as a tool to determine how to build state support and service systems that work for people. The findings for 2012 reveal that:

  1. While progress has been made, there is room for improvement: 36 states can now show that 80% of the individuals with ID/DD in their states are served in the community;  

     

  2. States are becoming more involved in ensuring the quality of the services they provide: 29 states have established a comprehensive quality assurance program to measure the outcomes of the community services they deliver;  

     

  3. But there is still more to do, particularly in providing services: waiting lists for critical community services continue to climb with more than a quarter of a million, or 268,000, people with ID/DD.

The 2012 report tracks the progress of community living standards, and it shows that the states with the best services and supports for Americans living with disabilities are Arizona, Michigan and California. The lowest performing states are Arkansas, Texas and Mississippi, which have remained at the bottom of the rankings since The Case for Inclusion was first published in 2006.  

While many states appear to be financially stable, the coming intersection of an aging population, people living with disabilities, and limited financial resources, will have a significant impact on the country’s entitlement programs. 

The report examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, the findings develop a comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

Since 2006, these rankings enable families, advocates, the media and policymakers to fully understand each state’s progress or lack of improvement, and help to protect successful efforts against unwise funding cuts, as well as guide future reforms to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for these, and ultimately all, Americans.

“Each year, UCP publishes The Case for Inclusion as part of its continuing efforts to advocate for civil rights protections and public policies that provide support for individuals living with disabilities, ensuring fair and full citizenship for all Americans,” said UCP President & CEO, Stephen Bennett. “The Case for Inclusion clearly identifies the states that are successful in providing the supports and services that people living with disabilities need, as well as states that are struggling. I urge all states and advocates to utilize The Case for Inclusion as a tool to strengthen their efforts, and to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities.”

“It is critical that states honor their obligations to people with disabilities by providing comprehensive and high-quality services through their Medicaid programs. That is why people with disabilities and our allies are fighting to preserve and improve Medicaid at the state and federal levels. The Case for Inclusion makes clear that some states are falling short and provides a roadmap for advocacy. AAPD encourages our community, members, and supporters to use this tool in our continued efforts to preserve the vital services and supports that enable eight million people with disabilities to live the lives we deserve,” said AAPD President and CEO Mark Perriello. 

Online features, reports and data:

The 2012 report and data from all previous reports is available on UCP’s website using a robust new web module and design at ucp.org/public-policy/the-case-for-inclusion. Users can:

  • Compare state & national data

  • View state scorecards 

  • Interact with the ranking map 

  • See highlights of the 2012 report, top and bottom 10 states, most improved states and those with biggest drops, and  facts about the best performing states

  • Advocate for areas needing improvement in states, and promote achievements that maintain high quality outcomes, like eliminating waiting lists and closing large institutions

  • Download the full 2012 report and previous reports 

Users can pull individual state outcomes and measures, track each state’s performance over time, and compare states among one another and to the US average. The Case for Inclusion data, tables and graphs are exportable and printable as needed for personal and professional use. 

For further detail about the report itself, there will be a press briefing at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT). Author Tarren Bragdon will provide insight into the rankings and data, which advocacy groups and individuals can use to raise awareness for key outcomes for people with disabilities.

  • Toll-free: 1-888-450-5996

  • Participant passcode: 786597

# # #

About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)

The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), the country’s largest cross-disability membership association, organizes the disability community to be a powerful force for change – politically, economically, and socially. AAPD was founded in 1995 to help unite the diverse community of people with disabilities, including their family, friends and supporters, and to be a national voice for change in implementing the goals of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). To learn more, visit the AAPD Web site: www.aapd.com.

UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE        

CONTACT: 
Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175,

UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

 

The Case for Inclusion analyzes and ranks states on services for Americans with intellectual and development disabilities                                                                                             

Washington, DC (May 23, 2012) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released The Case for Inclusion today, an annual report that tracks the progress of community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), and there will be a press briefing at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT). Author Tarren Bragdon will provide insight into the rankings and data, which advocacy groups and individuals can use to raise awareness for key outcomes for people with disabilities.

  • Toll-free: 1-888-450-5996
  • Participant passcode: 786597


The findings for 2012 reveal that:

  1. While progress has been made, there is room for improvement: 36 states can now show that 80% of the individuals with ID/DD in their states are served in the community;
     
  2. States are becoming more involved in ensuring the quality of the services they provide: 29 states have established a comprehensive quality assurance program to measure the outcomes of the community services they deliver; and
     
  3. But there is still more to do, particularly in providing services: waiting lists for critical community services continue to climb with more than a quarter of a million, (268,000), people with ID/DD.

The 2012 report shows that the states with the best services and supports for Americans living with disabilities are Arizona, Michigan and California. The lowest performing states are Arkansas, Texas and Mississippi, which have remained at the bottom of the rankings since The Case for Inclusion was first published in 2006.

While many states appear to be financially stable, the coming intersection of an aging population, people living with disabilities, and limited financial resources will have a significant impact on the country.

The report examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, UCP is able to develop a comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

Since 2006, these rankings enable families, advocates, the media and policymakers to fully understand each state’s progress or lack of improvement, and help to protect successful efforts against unwise funding cuts, as well as guide future reforms to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for these, and ultimately all, Americans.

“Each year, UCP publishes The Case for Inclusion as part of its continuing efforts to advocate for civil rights protections and public policies that provide support for individuals living with disabilities, ensuring fair and full citizenship for all Americans,” said UCP President & CEO, Stephen Bennett. “The Case for Inclusion clearly identifies the states that are successful in providing the supports and services that people living with disabilities need, as well as states that are struggling. I urge all states and advocates to utilize The Case for Inclusion as a tool to strengthen their efforts, and to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities.”

New online features, reports and data:
The 2012 report, in addition to data from all previous reports since 2006, is available on UCP’s website using a robust new web module and design at ucp.org/public-policy/the-case-for-inclusion. Users can:

  • Compare state & national data
  • View state scorecards 
  • Interact with the ranking map 
  • See highlights of the 2012 report, top and bottom 10 states, most improved states and those with biggest drops, and  facts about the best performing states
  • Advocate for areas needing improvement in states, and promote achievements that maintain high quality outcomes, like eliminating waiting lists and closing large institutions
  • Download the full 2012 report and previous reports

Users can pull individual state outcomes and measures, track each state’s performance over time, and compare states among one another and to the US average. The Case for Inclusion data, tables and graphs are exportable and printable as needed for personal and professional use.

Importance, methodology and advocacy:
In the 1999 case Olmstead v. L.C., the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that institutionalizing individuals living with disabilities that can benefit from, and want to live in the community, was discrimination. The Case for Inclusion was developed in response to this decision, and ranks how well each state’s Medicaid programs serve Americans with ID/DD. These individuals, including the aging, deserve the same freedoms and quality of life as all Americans.

In rankings, each state and DC is analyzed and ranked based on five key outcome areas: promoting independence, tracking quality and safety, keeping families together, promoting productivity, and reaching those in need.

Significant takeaways from the 2012 ranking:

  1. All states still have room for improvement, but some states have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#48), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50);
     
  2. 36 states now meet the 80/80 Community standard, which means that at least 80% of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community, and 80% of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for community support;
     
  3. As of 2010, 11 states have no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon (new this year), Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and D.C. In addition, Minnesota closed its last remaining institution in June 2011, and another 12 states have only one institution each;
     
  4. 22 states now meet the 80% Home-like Setting standard, which means that at least 80% of all individuals with ID/DD are served in their own home, a family home, family foster care, shared apartments, or in other small group settings with fewer than three residents;
     
  5. 29 states participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) model, a comprehensive quality assurance program that includes standard measures to asses outcomes of services (nationalcoreindicators.org);
  6. Only 15 states were supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). This is important because those support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together and people with disabilities living in a community setting;
     
  7. Just nine states have at least one-third (33%) of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment, which best recognize and support work as key to a meaningful life. These states include Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Michigan, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Washington; and
     
  8. Waiting lists for critical services continue to climb and show the unmet need of individuals living with ID/DD and their families. More than a quarter of a million people (268,000) are on a waiting list for Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). To address this need, states’ HCBS programs would need to collectively increase by 46%.

# # #

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org

Press Briefing Wed. 1:00 p.m. EDT: UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

MEDIA ADVISORY: Press briefing

CONTACT: 

Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

The Case for Inclusion analyzes and ranks states on services for Americans with intellectual and development disabilities

Washington, DC (May 22, 2012)United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) will release The Case for Inclusion and host a press briefing with the author on  Wednesday, May 23 at 1:00 p.m. ET. This annual report tracks the progress of community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). Author Tarren Bragdon will provide insight into the rankings and data, which advocacy groups and individuals can use to raise awareness for key outcomes for people with disabilities.

WHO:            UCP

WHAT:          Press briefing with The Case for Inclusion author, Tarren Bragdon

WHEN:         1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT)

WHERE:       Toll-free: 1-888-450-5996

                       Participant passcode: 786597

# # #

About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

State of the States Survey: 2011

The National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities recently published findings from a survey of state aging and disability services. State Aging and Disability Agencies in Times of Change, highlights the roles and responsibilities of state aging and disabilities agencies during this unprecedented era of state agency reorganization, re-conceptualization of state government, and restructuring of long term services and supports delivery systems and financing.

The 2011 survey captured a snapshot of the states in a period of transition and change. Key elements driving continued change include the economic environment, Affordable Care Act implementation, uncertainty in the federal budget particularly with the failure of the Congressional Super Committee, changes in state level leadership, and the 2012 elections.

Money Follows the Person: A 2011 Survey of Transitions, Services and Costs

Most states receive federal funding to transition persons on Medicaid living in institutions to community living (often referred to as Money Follows the Person Demonstration). This report, Money Follows the Person: A 2011 Survey of Transitions, Services and Costs, from the Kaiser Family Foundation looks at the current status of the program including current enrollment, and per capita spending.

Disability Groups Respond to Supercommittee Failure

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

UCP Contacts:
Lauren Cozzi, 202-973-7114,  
Alicia Kubert Smith, 202-973-7168, 

AAPD Contacts:
Lara Schwartz, 202-521-4309, lschwartz@aapd.com
Frankie Mastrangelo, 202-521-4308, fmastrangelo@aapd.com     

Disability Groups Respond to Supercommittee Failure

Joint Statement by Mark Perriello of the American Association of People with Disabilities and Stephen Bennett, United Cerebral Palsy

Washington, D.C. (November 21, 2011) — “Since the Supercommittee was formed, Americans from all walks of life have spoken loud and clear: we support tangible, responsible solutions that preserve opportunity. The budget debate has moved from the Supercommittee to party leaders and back again, and has now apparently ground to a halt. Rigid adherence to ideology is again coming at the expense of every-day Americans who need their representatives to get something done. Instead of solutions, we’re left with uncertainty about the future. Today, real people who are already making do with very little are left to wonder if deficit reduction will result in opportunity reduction. Today’s news has not changed the fact that we need to protect our fiscal future and our national security while at the same time preserving essential lifelines for people with disabilities.”

Stephen Bennett is the President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy, and Mark Perriello is the President and CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities.

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation’s largest cross-disability organization. We promote equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. Our members, including people with disabilities and our family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change.  Visit www.AAPD.com for more information.

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