Innovators with Disabilities to Pitch to Major Corporations

UCP’s Life Labs Holds Innovation Lab at USBLN National Conference

 

Washington, D.C. (September, 21, 2015) – United Cerebral Palsy has partnered with USBLN, a national nonprofit that helps businesses drive performance by leveraging disability inclusion, to host an Innovation Lab during USBLN’s 18th Annual National Conference & Biz2Biz Expo in Austin, TX at the end of September.

Innovation Lab, part of UCP’s Life Labs initiative. brings together innovators from all walks of life to compete on teams to dream up the next big idea for people with disabilities. Using human-centered principles of Universal Design, the teams work with mentors and facilitators to tackle problems ranging from mobility to communication in an effort to help improve the every day lives of people with disabilities.

At the conference, Innovation Lab teams will consist of participants of the Career Link Mentoring Program. The program is a collaboration of USBLN and Cornell University’s Employment and Disability Institute, which provides a 6-month career mentoring opportunity to college students and recent graduates with disabilities through linkages to business professionals from USBLN member companies.

“Rather than continuing to retrofit our world to accommodate people with disabilities, there’s no reason why we can’t encourage future designs to work for people of all abilities,” said Gabriel Forsythe Y Korzeniewicz, Life Labs Program Manager. “Past Innovation Lab events have included people with and without disabilities – from students to engineers, to physical therapists and people from a variety of backgrounds. We’re excited that this will be our first Lab in which all of the competitors have disabilities. We’re interested to see what kinds of unique ideas will come from this group.”

From September 27-29 the Innovation Lab teams will compete for one of two opportunities to pitch their ideas “Shark Tank”-style to major corporate players such as IBM, Sprint, Verizon, 3M and Mitsubishi – all part of USBLN’s membership of 5000 of the top companies in America. On September 30, each team’s idea will on display at the Bizt2iz Expo so conference attendees can vote on which two ideas to elevate to the level of a pitch to potential investors.

UCP Receives Motorola Solutions Foundation Innovation Generation Grant

United Cerebral Palsy has received a grant for $20,000 as part of the “Innovation Generation Grant” program from the Motorola Solutions Foundation, the charitable arm of Motorola Solutions, Inc. Through the grant, UCP’s Life Labs initiative will distribute universal design curriculum modules through iTunes U and offer an immersive two-day design challenge, called an Innovation Lab, to engage students across disciplines in human centered design concepts.

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The Innovation Generation program awards organizations such as UCP that foster and support science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) initiatives for teachers and U.S. preschool through university students – especially girls and underrepresented minorities, such as people with disabilities.

“It’s amazing to watch people who participate in an Innovation Lab leave with a greater understanding of the challenges that people with disabilities face and a new confidence that they can participate in solving some of those challenges,” said Josef Scarantino, Acting Director of UCP’s Life Labs. “This program has the power to change career trajectories and open up a new worlds of creativity and innovation.”

Innovation Lab HeaderAfter several successful Innovation Lab events in 2014 and 2015, UCP’s Life Labs shaped the Innovation Lab into a curriculum, which can easily be adapted to any school degree program. Utilizing Apple’s iTunes U education content platform, UCP’s Life Labs plans to build a large national presence of students and open the curriculum to outside academic and industry collaboration. The curriculum and Innovation Lab events will be made available to UCP’s network of eighty affiliates through a toolkit that combines all the necessary resources.

The Motorola Solutions Foundation grant program overall will impact about 900,000 students and teachers, each receiving an average of 100 programming hours from our partner non-profit organizations and institutions. Programs will support special populations including girls and women, underrepresented minorities, the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, people with disabilities and the military.

“The Motorola Solutions Foundation created the Innovation Generation Grant program eight years ago to support educational experiences that spark students to turn their dreams into the innovations that will shape our society’s future,” said Matt Blakely, director of the Motorola Solutions Foundation. “Organizations like UCP are teaching tomorrow’s leaders that careers in engineering and technology are not only fun, but also within their reach.”

For additional information on the Motorola Solutions Foundation grants programs, visit: http://responsibility.motorolasolutions.com/index.php/solutions-for-community/ and for more information on UCP please visit www.ucp.org

 

About Motorola Solutions Foundation

The Motorola Solutions Foundation is the charitable and philanthropic arm of Motorola Solutions. With employees located around the globe, Motorola Solutions seeks to benefit the communities where it operates. The company achieves this by making strategic grants, forging strong community partnerships and fostering innovation. The Motorola Solutions Foundation focuses its funding on public safety, disaster relief, employee programs and education, especially science, technology, engineering and math programming. For more information on Motorola Solutions Corporate and Foundation giving, visit our website: www.motorolasolutions.com/giving.

 

 

Innovation Lab Design Challenge Debuts

Intensive Two-Day Event from UCP’s Life Labs Coming to Chicago 

 

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) Life Labs initiative will bring an intensive, two-day design challenge called an Innovation Lab to Chicago May 19-20, 2015. Following successful events in London, Washington DC, and Sydney, Australia, the Innovation Lab (formerly called Enabled by Design-athon) brings together people from all walks of life under the principles of Universal Design to dream up the next big idea for people with and without disabilities.

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At each Innovation Lab, this diversity of talent from a variety of fields is coached to use human-centered Universal Design concepts to solve every day problems as part of a competitive yet collaborative design challenge for team prizes. Designers, engineers, inventors, makers and hackers as well as professionals and caregivers in the disability field are all encouraged to contribute their unique perspectives to the process.

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Innovation Lab Featured Speaker Paul Edlund – Microsoft Core Technologies Chief Technologist

The inaugural Innovation Lab scheduled for Chicago will take place at the Microsoft Technology Center and will be co-hosted by Smart Chicago. Smart Chicago is a civic organization devoted to improving lives in Chicago through technology by increasing access to the Internet, improving skills for using Internet, and developing meaningful products from data that measurably contribute to the quality of life of residents in the region and beyond.

“Here at Microsoft we are focused on improving the lives of citizens through technology,” said Shelley Stern Grach, Director of Civic Engagement at Microsoft. “The Innovation Lab focuses on the principles of design to provide opportunity and access to technology for diverse communities, and we’re excited to sMicrosoft Technology Center 2ee what the teams come up with.”

Teams will design and build prototypes or present plans that demonstrate how products can rapidly be created to better fit with people’s lives and needs, no matter what those need may be. UCP’s Life Labs is intent on creating a movement of accessibility for the masses so that mainstream products work for as many people as possible, including those with disabilities and older people. The Innovation Lab events are meant to challenge preconceptions of assistive equipment, showing how products can be personalized, purposeful and beautifully designed too.

“Rather than continuing to retrofit our world to accommodate people with disabilities, there’s no reason why we can’t design our world to work for people of all abilities,” said Marc Irlandez, Director of UCP’s Life Labs.

Registration is now open at http://ucpinnovationlab.org/ Space is limited.

 

Co-hosted by:

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Thanks to our sponsors:

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Young Inventor Focuses on People with Disabilities

Srijay KatsuriAt 14 years old, Srijay Kasturi was the youngest person ever to compete in the Enabled by Design-athon innovation challenge held last November by UCP’s Life Labs program. Along with his mother Sudhita, Srijay was on the winning team which came up with an idea for an app for people with autism. UCP was thrilled to discover that Sirjay was an inventor with another concept, called STRIDE, already in progress. Although he has no personal connection to disability, his creations have centered on the concept of helping people with disabilities better navigate, and as a result, participate in the world. In this interview, Srijay describes his motivations and the evolution of STRIDE for people with visual impairment.

 

UCP: When did you first realize you had an interest in innovating with technology?
SRIJAY:
I have no idea when I realized I had an interest in innovating. My parents say that I have been thinking of creative solutions for day-to-day problems from a young age. One of my first innovations was around the age of 12, so about 2 years ago, and I’ve just been going since then!

UCP: What was your inspiration for STRIDE? Do you know someone with vision impairment?
SRIJAY:
No, unfortunately (or fortunately!) I don’t know anyone with vision impairment. STRIDE is really the evolution of one of my old(er) inventions, the Camera Centering Tripod Mount (CCTM). Once I finished my proof of concept for the CCTM, I submitted it to the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge where I, and the CCTM, were selected to be finalists in the competition. Once selected, I worked with a mentor from 3M, Dr. James Jonza, to develop the CCTM further. However, once I started working, my mentor and I discussed if there was a way for the CCTM to help more people… and from there, STRIDE (stepwithstride.com) was born. STRIDE eventually went on to win 3rd place in the competition, and well, the rest is history.

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UCP: Tell us how it came to be and how you envision it working for people.

SRIJAY: I envision people using STRIDE in their everyday lives, 24/7. They put it on when they put on their shoes, and walk around all day using it. STRIDE alerts the user to any objects in their path. The closer the object the stronger the alert. One of the advantages of STRIDE is that if the user changes shoes they can move the device from one pair of shoes to another. STRIDE involved a lot of hard work, and a bunch of trial and error. They say to do anything, it takes 1% inspiration, and 99% perspiration! This is definitely the case for STRIDE

UCP: Is this your first invention?

SRIJAY: Nope! STRIDE is based on an older invention of mine and shares a lot of the same ideas with said older invention. Since childhood my dad has encouraged me to think creatively and outside the box which has led to innovation and inventions.

UCP: What other areas of design and technology interest you? 

SRIJAY: Hmm… that’s a tough one. I love programming software, to the point that I used programming to finish an English class project – an innovative approach to English class! I love web-design, and I have created various dynamic websites using the Flask framework for the backend, and the Bootstrap framework for the frontend.

UCP: How did you hear about the November 2014 Enabled by Design-athon event?

SRIJAY:In March of 2014, there was a Mini Makers Faire, in Northern Virginia, near where I live. I was one of the Young Makers at the Faire and Mr. Patrick Timony from the D.C. Public Library stopped by my table to learn about STRIDE. Mr. Timony is their Adaptive Technology Librarian. He told me about the Design-athon and encouraged me to register.

2014 DesignathonUCP: What motivated you to want to attend?
SRIJAY:
When I realized that the aim of the Design-athon was to help people with disabilities, I realized that it would be a great event to go to, not only to help me understand what I needed to do with regards to STRIDE, but to meet other like-minded people, including the great people here at UCP! The event gave me a better understanding of the challenges faced by people who have disabilities and how many things we take for granted.

UCP: Tell us about your team, idea and experience at the event.
SRIJAY:
My team, called Stars at War, consisted of 8 people. We all came from various viewpoints, and different perspectives, so we each brought something unique to the table. Our idea was a product called Simplyfi. We learned that people with autism sometimes take take idioms literally. Simplyfi helps translate hard-to-understand idioms into simpler easy-to-understand straightforward English.

For example, if you say that the Design-athon was “a piece of cake”, a person with autism may think quite literally that the event was a piece of cake, while we’d understand that by a “piece of cake,” you really meant it was very easy. To help alleviate this problem, we built an app that defines these idioms, so that they can better understand the figurative language.

UCP: Are you interested in developing this idea further – possibly bringing it to market?

SRIJAY:Yes I am! There still is a lot of work that needs to be done for the programming of Simplyfi. However, I have been so busy developing STRIDE that I really have not had much time to focus on Simplyfi and finish programming it – but I do intend on finishing it sometime in the near future!

There is also a competition called DECA. For this event we have to write a marketing plan for a product and my partner and I decided to write a plan for Simplyfi. Here’s to hoping we move on to ICDC (International Career Development Conference)!

UCP: What is the status of your current project?
SRIJAY:
I decided to revamp STRIDE so it would better fit the needs and wants of the visually impaired. I would like it to be Bluetooth-enabled so access to building maps etc. via an app are available to users. For STRIDE to be more sleek, I am working on a hardware redesign using smaller components. I’m looking for advice in the fields of case-design and software to make the device more accurate and usable. I would also like to consult with a patent attorney and look into funding sources so I can take STRIDE to production. My goal is to have STRIDE ready for market by the end of the year. This of course, will mean getting some help in the area of marketing, if anyone wants to collaborate with me.

UCP: Do you collaborate with anyone on your ideas?
SRIJAY:
Yes! There are two amazing Facebook groups that I just love. The first is Hackathon Hackers (HH), a group of over 1000 people dedicated to helping others write programs and compete at hackathons. Also, I am a part of a Facebook group called High School Hackers (HSH). HSH was created for the sole purpose of getting high schoolers interested in programming, and attending hackathons. Aside from Facebook groups I am also heavily involved with a makers space in Reston called Nova Labs. Nova Labs is a great place full of people who are extremely knowledgeable about all kinds of things. In fact, I owe most of the success of STRIDE to Nova Labs, since I have learned so much from the mentors there!

UCP: Tell us more about your thoughts on open-source and why you would want to keep a part of this invention proprietary?
SRIJAY:
I believe that open-source is the future. Open-source projects basically allow for improved sharing of ideas, and allows for these ideas to help the most number of people. I decided to release enough of STRIDE for anyone to create it, but I am keeping enough of STRIDE proprietary so that I can still sell a unique product and have control over it’s pricing and future development.

UCP: What are your plans for the immediate future? Your career?
SRIJAY:
I am a freshman in highschool so a lot of my efforts are dedicated towards learning and doing well in school. I am also studying Sanskrit, an Indian language, learning to play the Mridangam, an Indian classical instrument, and I am a 2nd degree Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do. In the immediate future I would love to take STRIDE to market. Making Simplyfi available as an easy to use Google chrome extension is another goal. I also want to pursue a career in filmmaking, so we’ll see how that goes…

Sally Wants a Sponge House

Sally, a six-year-old child from the UK who has cerebral palsy inspired this year’s World CP Day project by saying she wants a “sponge house” to “stop me banging into things.”

The World CP Day project seeks ideas from people with disabilities like Sally, their families and supporters and then challenges designers and innovators to turn one of those ideas into reality in a global competition for thousands of dollars in prizes.

Like Sally, many children and adults with CP can be prone to knocks, bumps and falls because of unsteady movements. Every aspect of living spaces can be a physical challenge for people with CP. Furniture, household fittings and fixtures, appliances, even walls and floors can be hazardous.

Take the Challenge:

Design a living space that that would minimize the risk of injury from knocks, bumps and falls for people with cerebral palsy. The design may incorporate one or more of these elements: physical layout, furniture, furnishings, fixtures, fittings, appliances, surfaces – e.g. walls, floors, and/or lighting.

Who Can Enter?

The competition is open to everyone, including students and industry practitioners in the fields of interior design, architecture, industrial design, furniture design, etc. An individual, group, university or company can submit an entry.

Applications are accepted until Friday June 19, 2015. There is no entry fee.

Prizes:

Institution prize (e.g. university team or company): $5,000

Individual prize:

  • Winner – one $3,000 prize
  • Highly Commended – two prizes of $1,000

In addition to the prizes, winners will be awarded certificates, acknowledged on the World Cerebral Palsy Day website and social media channels, and promoted to design media.

To Enter:

Register your expression of interest on the World CP Day website. We will send you the full competition guidelines and keep you posted throughout the competition.

www.worldcpday.org

Proudly supported by The Allergan Foundation

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Design Innovation Program Wins Grant from Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation

United Cerebral Palsy’s Life Labs to Take Universal Design Thinking to Apple’s iTunes U

Washington, D.C. (January 20, 2015) – United Cerebral Palsy’s (UCP) Life Labs initiative was  awarded a significant grant from Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation. The grant will help fund a unique new approach to fostering innovation in design and technology for people with and without disabilities.

The project embraces the principles of Universal Design, which strives to create products and environments that are inherently usable and accessible to all people, including people with disabilities. It will deliver an open-source event toolkit and a full curriculum built around UCP Life Labs “maker fair” event concept and distributed through Apple’s iTunes U. UCP is one of less than 100 nonprofit partners – and the only disability organization – curated by iTunes U for educational materials offered to more than 250,000 students.

UCP’s Life Labs held a small-scale version of the event in Washington, D.C. in each of the past two years, bringing together people with disabilities, inventors, hackers and other innovators with and without disabilities. In a friendly competition, attendees developed ideas for revolutionary products and services using a Universal Design approach. With input from mentors with disabilities, team members collaborated to create workable solutions for everyday problems that they then pitched to judges in an atmosphere similar to the hit TV show “Shark Tank.”

“It’s time to take this to the next level,” said Marc Irlandez, director of UCP’s Life Labs. “We were looking for a way to bring the event to a greater number of people in more locations. Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation saw the possibilities and iTunes U was the perfect platform to help make sure that anyone who wants to learn how to make the world a better place through Universal Design can do so.”

“By providing opportunities for people with and without disabilities to work together with industry leaders in a creative way to design accessible consumer products, this project not only exposes students to careers in science and technology, but it also helps raise the awareness of the capabilities of people with disabilities,” said Kevin R. Webb, senior director, Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation. “Ultimately, it will help empower youth with disabilities to make changes for the better in society, which is the mission of our Foundation, and why Mitsubishi Electric is proud to provide support to help replicate and expand this innovative project.”

The initial goal of the materials to be made available via iTunes U is to introduce college-age students to the concept of Universal Design and inspire innovation. Eventually, other materials will be developed as part of a school’s STEM lessons that K-12 learners can adopt.

“It’s significant that a large national nonprofit such as UCP is able to work with a recognized brand as iTunes and be supported by such a well-known foundation as Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation,” said Stephen Bennett, president and CEO of UCP. “With this level of credibility and this unique learning platform, this project is bound to bridge the gap between designers and engineers and people with disabilities, to the collective benefit of us all.”

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About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a broad range of disabilities and their families. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, visit www.ucp.org.

About Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation

The Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation, based in the Washington, DC area, was established in 1991 by Mitsubishi Electric Corporation and the Mitsubishi Electric U.S. companies, which produce, sell and distribute a wide range of consumer, industrial, commercial and professional electronics products. The Foundation has contributed more than $13 million to organizations that are empowering young people with disabilities to lead more inclusive and productive lives.

To learn more, visit the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation’s website at www.MEAF.org.

Leader in Universal Design Field to Kick Off Design-athon

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John Salmen, AIA, CAE, is scheduled to kick off the UCP’s Life Labs initiative Enabled by Design-athon: DC Edition on Wednesday, November 5. The president of Universal Designers & Consultants, Inc. and internationally recognized leader in the universal design field, Mr. Salmen has specialized in barrier free design for more than 35 years, creating environments to be usable by people of all ages and abilities, to the greatest extent possible. He is one of the leading experts in the technical aspects of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and has authored several books including: Accessible ArchitectureThe Do-Able Renewable Home,Accommodating All Guests and Everyone’s Welcome.

He joins Adrienne Biddings, Policy Counsel for Google. Brett Heising of www.brettapproved.com and Maria Town, the influential blogger who created http://cpshoes.tumblr.com/. Also on tap is the 2013 DoSomething Grant winner, Diego Marsical. The speakers will offer “lightning” talks on accessibility and design for people with disabilities at the Great Hall at the Martin Luther King Memorial Library from 6:00-8:00 p.m., which will be followed by networking time at a happy hour at a local establishment to be determined. This event is the prelude to a two-day design workshop at Google’s D.C. offices on November 6-7 where teams will compete to come up with the best design. A $25 registration fee is required for the workshop, however, the Wednesday evening event is FREE and you do not have to participate in the full workshop to attend (registration is required and space is limited).

“This is an opportunity for designers, technologists, engineers, students, caregivers and people with disabilities to collaborate and learn from each other how to use human-centered universal design concepts to solve every day challenges,” said Marc Irlandez, Director of Information, Technology and Life Labs at UCP. “We believe good design goes a long way towards helping people live as independently as possible by making day-to-day tasks just a little easier.”

The event is sponsored by Google, CareerBuilder, Sprint Relay, PCS Engineering, Sugru, the CEA Foundation, Tech Shop and Coroflot. Academic partners include Marymount University and the Cocoran School of the Arts & Design at George Washington, University. It has been featured on the Core77 Design blog and in the Tech Shop newsletter.

Get more information and register at http://ucpdesignathon.org/.

Enabled by Design-athon Happening This Fall

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United Cerebral Palsy is bringing you another great event this fall! Sign up now to attend Enabled by Design-athon: D.C. Edition November 5-7. UCP’s Life Labs initiative is hosting this dynamic event to encourage innovation by designers, inventors, hackers and makers for the benefit of people with disabilities.

Spread the word to those you know who have the big ideas and perspective that have made three previous events in London, D.C. and, recently, Sydney, Australia, such a success. We’re looking to bring together teams of dreamers, including people with disabilities, to design and prototype accessible products which provide innovative solutions for the everyday challenges faced by people with various disabilities.

We’ll kick things off Wednesday evening, November 5 at the Great Hall at the Martin Luther King Memorial Library, where the public is invited to network and hear from keynote speaker Adrienne Biddings, Policy Counsel for Google. Adrienne will bring her expertise in making communications media accessible, diverse and responsive to the needs of all segments of the community. Other speakers include Brett Heising of www.brettapproved.com and Maria Town, the influential blogger who created http://cpshoes.tumblr.com/ and representatives from iStrategy Labs. Also participating is the Corcoran/GWU School of Arts + Design.

Thursday, November 7, begins the two-day design workshop at Google’s D.C. offices where team will compete to come up with the best design. A $25 registration fee is required for the workshop, however, the Wednesday evening event is free and you do not have to participate in the full workshop to attend (registration is required and space is limited)

“This is an opportunity for designers, technologists, engineers, students, caregivers and people with disabilities to collaborate and learn from each other how to use human-centered universal design concepts to solve every day challenges,” said Marc Irlandez, Director of Information, Technology and Life Labs at UCP. “We believe good design goes a long way towards helping people live as independently as possible by making day-to-day tasks just a little easier.”

The event is sponsored by Google, Sprint Relay, PCS Engineering, Sugru and the CEA Foundation.

Registration opens today! Get more information at http://ucpdesignathon.org/.

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