UCP Chats with U.S. National Paralympic Soccer Team

UCP recently spoke with Stuart Sharp, Head Coach of the U.S. National Paralympic Soccer Team, and two of the team’s players, Chris Ahrens and Rene Renteria to learn more about the sport. Chatting with us fresh after a team’s practice in San Diego, California, Sharp discusses the rules of the sport, its classification system, ways people can become involved and more. Ahrens, who has cerebral palsy and Renteria, who has a traumatic brain injury, share their stories of how they became involved with Paralympic soccer, as well as discuss their training routines. Check out the full video below! If you would like to learn more, you can follow the team on Facebook and Twitter or visit http://www.ussoccer.com/paralympic-soccer.

 

Time to Swim! UCP’s Interview with Dr. Deborah E. Thorpe

by O’Ryan Case, UCP’s Manager of Public Education Programs

Thorpe- Headshot- 2012

 

 

Debbie Thorpe, PT, PhD
Associate Professor
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

 

 

Summer is underway! A short while ago, we talked about the importance of inclusive summer camps and, this month, we are highlighting the many benefits that swimming brings to individuals with a range of disabilities (well, all individuals to be exact!). 

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Deborah E. Thorpe, a physical therapist who who is an Associate Professor at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Thorpe led Project ACT NOW (Adults with Cerebral Palsy Training to Increase Overall Wellness), which investigated the effects of aquatic exercise on fitness and participation of adults with cerebral palsy (CP). See below to check out the interview!

Interview with Dr. Deborah E. Thorpe (DT):


Thanks so much for speaking with me and sharing your expertise around aquatic exercise with our UCP audience! I’ll begin with the workout that swimming brings. I have spastic diplegic CP and, whenever, I swim, it really feels like a complete workout. Can you tell me a little more about why this is and why I feel this way?

DT: It’s because aquatic exercise is a whole-body workout. When you exercise in the water, you’re moving against resistance the entire time– and this is a lot more resistance than what is felt on land. Water applies variable resistance, so the slower you move through water, the less resistance you experience against your movements. Conversely, the faster you move through water, the more resistance you experience. When you push ten pounds worth of force through water, you’re getting ten pounds pushed against you. Every muscle group can be exercised against resistance much easier in the water than on land. Also, for individuals with muscle weakness and limited range of motion, different movements, such as abduction, can be very difficult on land. But in the water, properties like buoyancy (the upward force of the water pushing against the object that is being submerged) make these movements much easier.


You’re right. I’m able to do much more with my legs when I’m in water than when I’m on land. Can you explain water’s buoyancy a bit more?
 

DT: Water’s buoyancy affects the amount of weight bearing on your legs. When you’re in waist-deep water, your legs are only having to support 50% of your body weight. In chest-deep water, your legs are only having to support 25% of your body weight. In neck-deep water, your legs are only supporting 10% of your body weight. Moving in water is so much easier for individuals with neuromuscular challenges, such as CP. If individuals have a hard time standing, I’ll put them in chest-deep water and they can stand and many times walk with their feet flat on the bottom of the pool. Once they get stronger, we’ll move to waist-deep and then knee-level water. Then, before you know it, they’re in mid-calf water.

 

So in addition to making the movements much easier, what other kinds of benefits come with swimming and other aquatic exercises?

DT: Well, it’s a safer environment in which to try more risky movements. I can’t get all of the kids I work with to jump off a step when they’re on land. But if I ask them to jump while they’re in the water, they feel safer and safety isn’t much of an issue. I can get people to jump up and down, or stand on one leg without losing their balance, which may be very difficult on land. If they fall in the water, they will not get injured. 

I mentioned it brings a total-body workout and helps with increasing range of motion in most muscles. In chest-deep water, the hydrostatic pressure produced by the water pushes against and gives a quick stretch to your diaphragm. It works the muscles in your chest– kids with CP tend to take short breaths, which is why some have softer voices, as they’re not filling their lungs all the way up with air and have trouble pushing air out of their lungs. When water is pushing against your diaphragm and providing resistance, by breathing you’re building up its strength and increasing the ability for the lungs to expand more and, ultimately, you can take in more air; it can definitely help with breathing.

Additionally, this hydrostatic pressure pushes on organs, such as the bladder and bowels and helps these organs to better perform. What do we all do after a half hour or so of aquatic exercise? Go to the bathroom!

 

Wow, that’s a lot! Do these benefits tend to last? 

DT: Anecdotally, adults with CP and parents of children with CP have told me that they’ve seen these types of benefits last for up to 24 – 48 hours.

The hydrostatic pressure produced in the water is a natural pump. Being in water is almost like wrapping an ace bandage around your calf moderately tight. The pressure of the water pushes lactic acid (which you build up while exercising and is what makes your muscles sore) out of the muscles at a faster rate than when doing land-based exercises.

 

So just to confirm, would you say these benefits apply to individuals of all ages and with all types of disabilities?

DT: Absolutely. I’ve worked in the water with babies, as well as individuals in their 70s. And I’ve worked with individuals with CP, Down syndrome, spina bifida and more. There is no one who can’t go in the water. For someone who has a tracheostomy, more precautions need to be addressed, such as making sure water doesn’t get into the trach.  If someone has a seizure disorder, you have to make sure the seizures are controlled and monitor him or her closely.

Let me tell you about one woman with whom I have worked with in the water. She has spastic quadriplegic CP and has used a power wheelchair since she was a child. She basically has only limited movement in her hands out of water– but in neck-deep water, I have seen her running!

 

That is incredible. Another thing about swimming that I’d point out is that it’s something people of all abilities can enjoy– it’s fun! Can you talk a little bit about that? 

DT: It also brings so many psychological benefits. I put all kids, no matter what their ability level is, in the water together. It’s amazing to watch them play basketball in the pool. Water “levels the playing field” and they all have a lot of fun. So in addition to the physiological and safety advantages, there are psychological ones involved as well.

Take kids who want to play t-ball. We play in the water! With the water resisting their movements and them having to fight the currents that are created in a pool from people moving around, the core is being strengthened. So you not only get stronger, but your balance improves.

 

What kind of timetable do you see with these types of results? 

DT: Everyone is different, so it all depends on the person and their abilities. But I’ll give you an example. I worked with a twenty-one year old man with spastic diplegic CP, who was an assistant head coach for his college’s baseball team. He told me he was always tired and that he wanted to gain strength so that he could do fun things after class and baseball events (just like every other college student). His upper body was very strong but his legs were very weak and atrophied. He came into my program and we worked for 45 minutes, three days per week for ten weeks. At the end of those ten weeks, I measured his function– he gained 200% in strength in both of his legs! Also, he was able to walk around the living room for the first time without using his forearm crutches! 

I also did a study with adults, where we worked three times per week for twelve weeks. Results indicated a trend toward improving their bone-mineral density. I can’t say this was directly a result of  aquatic exercise but they were definitely increasing their strength. The ones who walked were walking further and faster– and the water seemed to be the catalyst. Unfortunately, at a six-month follow-up assessment, a majority of their assessment measures were back to their baseline. Only a few had joined a facility where they could exercise in the water.  When they were in the study, they were provided with a pool membership for the course of the study and had camaraderie during their exercise sessions and tons of support. When the study ended, those supports went away.

 

I can say that having a chance to interact and train with other individuals who have disabilities would be fun and bring a sense of comfort. It’s certainly different when I may be the only person in the water or at a gym with a disability.

DT: I understand. I’ve been researching these types of barriers. Cost is a major barrier– a pool or gym membership that costs $35 per month is tough. Transportation is a barrier. And feeling like no one at a pool or gym knows what you can and cannot do is another barrier to exercise. Let me point out that there are personal trainers out there who are American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)- certified in working with individuals with chronic disabilities. These trainers will likely have at least some familiarity working with individuals with disabilities– so that would be something for individuals and families to consider is to check with exercise facilities to see if any of their staff has this certification.

 

All of this information is helpful. What would you tell an individual with a disability or a family member who wants to know ways to become involved with aquatic exercise  or aquatic therapy?

DT: First, I’d suggest getting a physical therapy evaluation. Get a prescription for an aquatic therapy evaluation from your primary care provider. The physical therapist will evaluate the individual on land and tell them the areas needing improvement (i.e. strengthening, flexibility, cardiorespiratory conditioning, etc). Insurance should pay for the physical therapy evaluation. After this evaluation, the therapist will then take the individual in the water and develop an aquatic exercise/therapy program for them. Note that aquatic exercise and aquatic therapy are different. You have to have a doctors prescription to get aquatic therapy but, with aquatic exercise, you can go to any pool and exercise in the water. Also, a  good resource to check out is the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD). There are a lot of exercise videos on its website.

 

So, as we wrap up, do you have any other closing remarks that you would like to share? 

DT: To the parents and caregivers that UCP serves, I would say get your children comfortable in the water. Parents can get very apprehensive about putting their children in the water– but consider enrolling them in swimming lessons. Remember, there are safe flotation devices out there. I would also suggest finding a physical or occupational therapist who does aquatic therapy and can do an evaluation and come up with an individualized program. Finally, remember that a big factor with swimming is its social aspect. Kids can become bored with physical therapy but aquatic exercise and swimming can happen anywhere– like we said earlier, it’s fun! I’m a huge proponent in getting involved in community-based physical activity. I want individuals of all abilities to go out and participate with their peers.

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It was such a pleasure learning more about the types of physiological, psychological and other benefits that come with aquatic exercise. Dr. Thorpe was also kind enough to share this video of someone she has worked with. 

 

If you would like to learn more about aquatic therapy, you can contact Dr. Thorpe at dthorpe@med.unc.edu or me at ocase@ucp.org.

 

 

The Tottering See-Saw of “Empathy Exercises”

by D’Arcee Neal, UCP’s Manager of Institutional Giving

D'Arcee Neal

D’Arcee Neal

Being a person who is disabled and who works as a disability advocate is like being on a see-saw. I am tempted at times –influenced by society and my own experiences – to move into rage mode, because so much of what I see day in and day out doesn’t mesh with what I know is right. But then I tilt toward the other side which is a “woe is me” mode of pity, sympathy and understanding because I know that I can better get my point across by interacting with people in a gentle, respectful way. In reality, I think that effective advocates balance on the see-saw’s fulcrum, right in the middle. You can teach without being combative, but shoving the rage down inside of you and ignoring what’s wrong with a pair of rose-colored contacts in your eyes helps no one.

 So, when I saw a video this week of CNN’s Anderson Cooper as he tried an empathy exercise for people who have schizophrenia, I moved back and forth on the emotional see-saw as I tried to make sense of what I was seeing. I came across the clip after seeing comments on it from people in an online Cerebral Palsy group I belong to. They were posting angry comments about the purpose of empathy exercises and their effectiveness with the general public. I wondered for a moment: do empathy exercises really do ANYTHING?

Most of us (especially people with disabilities) already know that nothing accurately replicates another individual’s struggles. This is partially why struggles are so difficult, whether it be issues of race, disability, sexuality or any of the myriad possibilities in the human race. However, this isn’t to say that we should just shrug our shoulders. If the only people willing to learn about disabilities were doctors, then the world would be a much different place, and society might see medical professionals as little more than morbidly curious paparazzi with scalpels instead of cameras.

Thankfully, the world isn’t like that and we have people from all walks of life dedicated to learning about, dealing with, and understanding people with disabilities. But for those who haven’t crossed that threshold of understanding, then empathy exercises are one of the best ways to offer them the tiniest glimpse into another person’s world. 

In college, I had a friend who decided to live in a wheelchair for 48 hours as part of a sociology project. In my mind, I laughed because I knew there was a slim chance that he would actually do it, but I played along. Just rolling about 2 or 3 blocks to the cafeteria for dinner together, he was out of breath from the effort. He exclaimed that he needed to “pause” the experiment because he had to use the bathroom really badly. My facial expression said it all. And I think he began to understand what many see as the fundamental flaw of the empathy exercise: they end. My Cerebral Palsy is a constant, all-day, all-consuming affair, much like any permanent disability and I understand why some people are angry about the idea that it is possible to simulate it. The exercise cheapens and reduces the experience, in their opinion.

I think that if the experience is framed in the right way, it could be such that people would never forget it. Even if the experience isn’t particularly powerful, the understanding is there at least for the moment, so that people might think about it in the future, and that’s a good thing. Honestly, that’s what I think empathy exercises are about – not about changing someone’s perspective in a mind-blowing way, but introducing small changes which allows leads them to momentary understanding which might come back. 

Empathy exercises may not be the societal game changer many people want it to be, but you have to start somewhere.