“Who I Am” PSA Spotlights Disability Employment

This week, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment launched a new public service announcement as part of their annual Campaign for Disability Employment (October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month). The PSA debuted at a special White House event on October 14 and will be distributed to television stations nationwide in November.
United Cerebral Palsy is proud to be a partner in the campaign and our Celebrity Ambassador, actor R. J. Mitte makes an appearance in the spot. The PSAs are being distributed in English and Spanish and are available through the campaign’s website as well as You Tube and Vimeo. UCP will be sharing a short version of the PSA online using the hashtag #WhoIAmPSA.

Take a moment to read a message about the PSA from Kathy Martinez, Assistant Secretary of the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor below:
“When we look at someone, do we see all of who they are?

This is the question the PSA “Who I Am” was created to address. “Who I Am” features nine people with disabilities who, with the notable exception of R.J. Mitte (featured in television’s “Breaking Bad”), are not actors. Not defined solely by their disability, each of these individuals is the sum of their many life roles—which includes working in jobs they love.

Given that nearly one in five Americans has a disability–many of which are not apparent–nearly all of us will be affected by disability at some point in our lifetime. Anyone may acquire a disability through accident, injury or aging and many people have a parent, spouse, relative, neighbor or friend with a disability. This inspiring PSA will resonate, particularly with those who may have a hidden disability or know family or friends who do.

“Who I Am” reminds us to see one another for who we are and what we can contribute. Employers and others watching the PSA will recognize the value of the diverse attributes, skills and talents that people with disabilities can bring to the workplace. The PSA will empower those with disabilities–especially those with non-apparent disabilities—to bring their whole selves to everything they do—including their work. “Who I Am” is the third in a series of PSAs from The Campaign for Disability Employment (CDE), a collaborative effort of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and leading business and disability organizations promoting employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

We are grateful that so many stations aired the CDE’s previous PSAs, “I Can” and “Because,” which achieved top ratings. Both helped demonstrate the value people with disabilities bring to the workplace. We hope you will do what you “can do” to help us continue spreading this important message by sharing this PSA.”

Sincerely,

Kathy Martinez

Assistant Secretary

Office of Disability Employment Policy

U.S. Department of Labor

www.whatcanyoudocampaign.org.

UCP Responds to Delay of Home Care Final Rule Enforcement

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is pleased to hear that the Department of Labor will delay enforcement of the final rule they issued tightening the Fair Labor Standards Act last fall for six months. The final rule significantly narrowed the “companionship exemption” to give nationwide minimum wage and overtime protections for in-home, direct support caregivers.

At the time the rule was issued, UCP made a statement warning of the serious potential consequences people with disabilities and their families faced. Many services provided by caregivers are reimbursed by Medicaid – which, in many states, does not allow for overtime. In these cases, the options for people with disabilities living in the community would be limited and result in more individuals winding up in costly institutions. We urged Medicaid agencies to set reimbursement rates that would enable caregivers to continue to provide the critical support people with disabilities need to live at home.

“We expect at this point that the Department of Labor will assess the potential harm this may cause for people with disabilities and their families. We are hopeful that the manner and timing of the enforcement protects both caregivers and the families they are serving,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “We want to see those caregivers fairly compensated for their work, but we don’t want that to come at the cost of someone else’s independence. We have come so far in helping individuals remain in their homes instead of being confined to institutions. It would be a shame if the unintended consequences of this rule unraveled that.”

 

 

Former Deputy Secretary of Labor, LinkedIn VP, Business Leader to Contribute to UCP’s Mission

 

Seth Harris

Seth Harris, Former Deputy Secretary of Labor and Cornell Distinguished Scholar

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) elected ten members to its Board of Trustees during its 2014 Annual Conference in Nashville, Tennessee including three members new to the organization. Seth Harris, former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Labor, Pablo Chavez, LinkedIn’s Vice President of Public Policy and a parent of a son with a disability, and Ouida Spencer, a long-time UCP advocate and volunteer from Georgia will join seven re-elected members to lead UCP into the future.

“Our Board of Trustees plays a critical role in guiding the UCP network forward, and we are honored to welcome such a talented and knowledgeable group onto the Board this year. We are very grateful for each new member’s dedication to our mission of enabling a life without limits for people with disabilities and their families, and look forward to their contributions,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy, in announcing the selection of Trustees.

Profiles of the newest board members are below. To view the complete list including re-elected trustees, please visit ucp.org/about/board.

Seth Harris served four and a half years as the US Deputy Secretary of Labor and six months as Acting US Secretary of Labor and a member of President Barack Obama’s Cabinet before becoming a Distinguished Scholar at Cornell and joining Dentons’ Public Policy and Regulation practice. He did some consultancy work for UCP in 2007 and 2008, most notably as the designer of the programmatic work that launched UCP’s Life Labs.

While at the Department of Labor, Harris contributed to our country’s economic recovery and millions of Americans returning to work. In 2007, Harris chaired Obama for America’s Labor, Employment and Workplace Policy Committee, and later founded the campaign’s Disability Policy Committee.  He oversaw the Obama-Biden transition team’s efforts in the Labor, Education and Transportation departments and 12 other agencies in 2008.

Also, Harris was a professor of law at New York Law School and director of its Labor and Employment Law programs as well as a scholar of the economics of disability law and topics.

Pablo Chavez is Vice President of Global Public Policy for LinkedIn and the parent of a young son with cerebral palsy. From 2006 to early 2014, Chavez was a member of Google’s public policy and government affairs team, where he held several leadership roles developing and executing advocacy initiatives promoting access to the Internet and other technologies.

Before then, Pablo worked in the US Senate as a counsel to Senator John McCain and to the Senate Commerce Committee. Pablo serves on the Board of Trustees for St. Coletta of Greater Washington, which is dedicated to assisting children and adults with special needs, and serves as a board member and in advisory capacities for a number of technology-related organizations. A graduate of Stanford Law School and Princeton University, Pablo lives in Washington, DC with his wife and two children.

Ouida Spencer has been a licensed Real Estate Broker and consultant in Georgia and South Carolina for over 17 years.  Previously she worked in banking as Senior Vice President with SunTrust Bank and Group Vice President with Decatur Federal.

She specializes in locating homes that can be modified for individuals with special needs and has worked to acquire properties for over 500 people who required special accessibility modifications. Spencer is a tireless advocate for housing rights of individuals with disabilities.

Spencer was nominated to UCP’s Board of Trustees after years of dedication to UCP affiliates in her area and her other volunteer efforts. Spencer is a Member of the DeKalb Association of Realtors, Chairman of the Board of Directors of UCP of Georgia, Member of the UCP Master Board of Directors South Florida/Georgia/South Carolina, Vice Chairman and Member of the Board of Directors UCP of South Carolina and a member of the UCP Affiliate Services Committee. Other volunteer activities include serving on the Board of Trustees of the Rosebud McCormick Foundation for over 26 years.

Spencer is the Past State President of the Georgia Federation of Business and Professional Women Club’s, Inc.  She is currently serving as Treasurer of the Decatur BPW and was recently elected to the Family Extended Care, Inc. board.

A graduate of Georgia State University where she received both her BBA and MBA degrees, Spencer lives in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

 

 

UCP ON NEW DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

UCP ON NEW DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULE

Washington, DC (September 20, 2013) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the following statement in response to a final rule from the U.S. Department of Labor aimed at tightening the Fair Labor Standards Act by significantly narrowing the “companionship exemption” to give nationwide minimum wage and overtime protections for in-home, direct support caregivers.

“While we understand that the new rule from the Department of Labor is intended to ensure that direct support caregivers are being compensated fairly for their work, there are serious potential consequences to these changes for individuals with disabilities.  Many of the services that these caregivers provide are reimbursed by Medicaid—which in many states does not allow for overtime.  This new rule may limit the services and supports that can be provided to individuals with disabilities living in the community, and ultimately result in more people with disabilities winding up in costly institutions,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “To avoid this unintended outcome, it is imperative that state Medicaid agencies take advantage of the delayed implementation of this rule to set reimbursement rates that will enable organizations like UCP to continue the in-home, community services and supports that people with disabilities need.”

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About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.