How Well Does Your State Serve People with Disabilities?

Arizona, Maryland, Missouri, New York & Hawaii Top 2015 Case for Inclusion Rankings

 

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2015 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report and interactive website used to track state-by-state community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

To download and read the entire Case for Inclusion report or explore the data, visit cfi.ucp.org.

TCase for Inclusionhe annual Case for Inclusion examines data and outcomes for all 50 States and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators. These indicators include how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. The report is a product of a comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

In addition to rankings, the report digs deeper into two critical issues facing people with disabilities and their families: waiting lists for services and support and transitioning from high school into an adult life in the community.

Since 2006, the rankings have enabled families, advocates, the media and policymakers to measure each state’s progress or lack of improvement and gain insight into how the highest-ranking states are achieving their success. An interactive website allows visitors to compare and contrast results among selected states and dig deeper into the data.

The report puts each State’s progress into a national context to help advocates and policymakers in their missions to improve life for people with disabilities and their families.

  • Advocates should use this information to educate other advocates, providers, families and individuals, policymakers and state administrations on areas needing improvement. The data can support policy reforms and frame debates about resource allocation. Advocates can also use the information to prioritize those areas that need immediate attention and support funding to maintain high quality outcomes, eliminate waiting lists and close large institutions.
  • Elected officials should use this report as a guide on which issues and States need time and attention and, possibly, more resources or more inclusive policies.
  • Federal and State administrations should use this report to put their work and accomplishments in context and to chart a course for the next focus area in the quest for continuous improvement and improved quality of life.

Stephen Bennett“Ultimately, the goal of all of this is to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for all Americans,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “UCP is committed to shining a light on how well states are actually serving people with disabilities and, by extension, their families and communities. Also, we want to provide the proper national context for this data so that we can truly use it to drive progress.”

 

How is your state doing? 

 

  1. All States still have room for improvement, but some States have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#47), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50) primarily due to the small portion of people and resources dedicated to those in small or home-like settings in these four states. Mississippi and Texas also do not participate in NCI.
  1. 32 States, down from 38, meet the 80/80 Home and Community Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community and 80 percent of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for home (less than 7 residents per setting) and community support. Those that do not meet the 80/80 standard are Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Virginia.
  1. As of 2013, 14 States report having no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Another 10 States have only one institution each (Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming). Since 1960, 220 of 354 state institutions have been closed (5 more in the past year alone), and 13 more are projected to close by 2016 in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey (3), New York (2), Oklahoma (2), Tennessee (2) and Virginia (2).
  2. For people with disabilities life should be without limits26 States, up from 18, now report meeting the 80 percent Home-Like Setting Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in settings such as their own home, a family home, family foster care or small group settings like shared apartments with fewer than four residents. The U.S. average for this standard is 79 percent. Just eight States meet a top-performing 90 percent Home-like Setting Standard: Arizona, California, Colorado, D.C., Hawaii, Nevada, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
  1. Ten States, up from seven last year, report at least 10 percent of individuals using self-directed services, according to the National Core Indicators survey in 29 States. These States include Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Utah and Virginia.
  1. 42 States, up from 39 last year, participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) survey, a comprehensive quality-assurance program that includes standard measurements to assess outcomes of services. A total of 29 States, a 50% increase from last year, reported data outcomes in 2014.
  1. Only 14 States report that they are supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). These support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together, and people with disabilities living in a community setting. These family-focused state programs were in Arizona, California, Delaware, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Alabama and Pennsylvania reported that they were providing higher levels of family support in last year’s ranking.
  1. Just 8 States, down from 10 last year, report having at least 33 percent of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment. These States include Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire (newly added), New Mexico, Oklahoma, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia (newly added). Louisiana, Nebraska, Oregon and Virginia reported that they met this threshold in last year’s ranking, but reported a decrease in competitive employment this year.
  1. 14 States report successfully placing at least 60 percent of individuals in vocational rehabilitation in jobs, with fifteen States reporting the average number of hours worked for those individuals placed being at least 25 hours. Three States report at least half of those served got a job within one year. Only California met the standard on all three success measures this year compared to last year’s ranking, when Nebraska and South Dakota were the only two states to report meeting all three thresholds.
  1. Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and show the unmet need. More than 322,000 people, 5,000 more than last year, are on a waiting list for Home and Community-Based Services. This requires a daunting 44 percent increase in States’ HCBS programs. 16 States, a decrease from 22 last year, report no waiting list or a small waiting list (requiring less than 10 percent program growth).

2013_donation_overlay_buttonYour support makes The Case for Inclusion possible each year. Make a gift today to help UCP continue to fulfill its mission of a Life Without Limits for people with disabilities and their families by providing advocacy, support and services. 

UCP Releases Case for Inclusion Rankings and Report

Arizona, Maryland, Missouri, New York & Hawaii Top 2015 List

 

Washington, D.C. (July 16, 2014) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2015 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report and interactive website used to track state-by-state community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

The Case for Inclusion examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, UCP is able to publish this comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

In addition to rankings, the report digs deeper into two critical issues facing people with disabilities and their families: waiting lists for services and support and transitioning from high school into an adult life in the community. Two case studies examine how states are approaching those issues.

Since 2006, the rankings have enabled families, advocates, the media and policymakers to measure each state’s progress or lack of improvement and gain insight into how the highest-ranking states are achieving their success. To enhance the usability of the report, UCP publishes tables of the data from which the report was compiled on an interactive website where visitors can compare and contrast results among selected states.

“Ultimately, the goal of all of this is to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for all Americans,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “UCP is committed to shining a light on how well states are actually serving people with disabilities and, by extension, their families and communities. Also, we want to provide the proper national context for this data so that we can truly use it to drive progress.”

To download and read the entire Case for Inclusion report or explore the data tables, visit cfi.ucp.org.

 

Significant Takeaways from the 2015 Ranking

Promoting Independence

  1. All States still have room for improvement, but some States have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#47), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50) primarily due to the small portion of people and resources dedicated to those in small or home-like settings in these four states. Mississippi and Texas also do not participate in NCI.
  1. 32 States, down from 38, meet the 80/80 Home and Community Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community and 80 percent of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for home (less than 7 residents per setting) and community support. Those that do not meet the 80/80 standard are Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Virginia.
  1. As of 2013, 14 States report having no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Another 10 States have only one institution each (Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming). Since 1960, 220 of 354 state institutions have been closed (5 more in the past year alone), according to the University of Minnesota’s Research and Training Center on Community Living. Another 13 more are projected to close by 2016 in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey (3), New York (2), Oklahoma (2), Tennessee (2) and Virginia (2)
  1. 26 States, up from 18, now report meeting the 80 percent Home-Like Setting Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in settings such as their own home, a family home, family foster care or small group settings like shared apartments with fewer than four residents. The U.S. average for this standard is 79 percent. Just eight States meet a top-performing 90 percent Home-like Setting Standard: Arizona, California, Colorado, D.C., Hawaii, Nevada, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
  1. Ten States, up from seven last year, report at least 10 percent of individuals using self-directed services, according to the National Core Indicators survey in 29 States. These States include Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Utah and Virginia.

Tracking Health, Safety and Quality of Life

  1. 42 States, up from 39 last year, participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) survey, a comprehensive quality-assurance program that includes standard measurements to assess outcomes of services. A total of 29 States, a 50% increase from last year, reported data outcomes in 2014.

Keeping Families Together

  1. Only 14 States report that they are supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). These support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together, and people with disabilities living in a community setting. These family-focused state programs were in Arizona, California, Delaware, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Alabama and Pennsylvania reported that they were providing higher levels of family support in last year’s ranking.

Promoting Productivity

  1. Just 8 States, down from 10 last year, report having at least 33 percent of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment. These States include Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire (newly added), New Mexico, Oklahoma, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia (newly added). Louisiana, Nebraska, Oregon and Virginia reported that they met this threshold in last year’s ranking, but reported a decrease in competitive employment this year.
  1. 14 States report successfully placing at least 60 percent of individuals in vocational rehabilitation in jobs, with fifteen States reporting the average number of hours worked for those individuals placed being at least 25 hours and three States reporting at least half of those served getting a job within one year. Only California met the standard on all three success measures this year compared to last year’s ranking, when Nebraska and South Dakota were the only two states to report meeting all three thresholds.

Serving Those in Need

  1. Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and show the unmet need. More than 322,000 people, 5,000 more than last year, are on a waiting list for Home and Community-Based Services. This requires a daunting 44 percent increase in States’ HCBS programs. 16 States, a decrease from 22 last year, report no waiting list or a small waiting list (requiring less than 10 percent program growth).

UCP RELEASES NEW REPORT ON STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175, krichards@ucp.org

 

UCP RELEASES NEW REPORT ON STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

New format highlights states’ successes with managed care and employment initiatives

Washington, DC (May 2, 2013) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2013 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report that tracks the progress of community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

The 2013 report, in addition to data from all previous reports since 2006, is available on UCP’s website using a robust new web module and design at http://ucp.org/the-case-for-inclusion/2013/.

Each state and the District of Columbia (DC) is analyzed and ranked based on five key outcome areas: promoting independence, tracking quality and safety, keeping families together, promoting productivity, and reaching those in need. Since 2006, these rankings enable families, advocates, the media and policymakers to fully understand each state’s progress or lack of improvement, and help to protect programs and services against unwise funding cuts, as well as guide future reforms to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for these, and ultimately all, Americans.

This year’s report highlights the progress that has been made, including:

·      38 states now meet the 80/80 Community standard, a dramatic increase from just 14 states in the 2007 report.

·      As of 2011, 13 states have no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD. 10 states have only one institution each.

·      Since 1960, 209 of 354 state institutions have been closed, leaving just 149 remaining.

·      21 states now meet the 80% Home-like Setting standard (80% in settings with 1-3 residents).  This is up from just 17 states in the 2007 report.

·      34 states participate in the National Core Indicators, an increase from 24 in the 2007 report.

·      15 states were supporting a large share of families through family support, up from just 10 states in the 2007 report.

The report also identifies problems, such as:

·      All states still have room for improvement, but some states have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, Arkansas (#50), Illinois (#48), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#49).

·      Just ten states have at least one-third (33%) of individuals in competitive employment. This is a downturn from 2007, when 17 states met this standard.

·      Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and have grown from 138,000 people in 2007 to 268,000. At this level, a growth of 44 percent would be needed to meet the need for services.

New in the 2013 Case for Inclusion is highlights of three case studies—two that examine trends in managed care for those with ID/DD with reforms in Kansas and Massachusetts, and one outlining the success of Washington State in promoting competitive employment through its Employment First policy and practices.

Kansas:

·      KanCare represents one of the most aggressive and comprehensive Medicaid reforms affecting those with ID/DD, directly integrating work, health and community; broadening the scope of benefits; and prioritizing competitive employment and improving health outcomes.

·      As of January 1, 2014, individuals with ID/DD will be able to chose from the three private plans currently offered to Medicaid enrollees, all of which fully integrate medical and behavioral health benefits and home and community-based services.

·      KanCare will focus on specific outcomes to determine success, including: increased competitive employment; improved life expectancy; integration of physical health, behavioral health and home and community based services; and improved health.

Massachusetts:

·      The first state to implement a statewide pilot program (called a demonstration) for all dually eligible individuals, including those with ID/DD, Massachusetts aims to improve coordination of care, actual health outcomes, and overall quality of life for Americans with developmental disabilities.

·      Individuals with ID/DD will have new benefits available through the ICO plans, including restorative dental services, expanded personal care assistance, and greater access to durable medical equipment, and the program defines its success on actual outcomes.

·      Although the actual outcomes tracked have yet to be determined, some of the possible measures to be included include access, person-centered care, integration of services and enrollee outcomes.

Washington:

·      Washington State’s Employment First policy supports employment and day program funds targeted for working-age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the individual may choose community access programs.

·      By focusing its efforts on this narrow window of time, Washington’s leaders and advocates addressed the difficult goal of finding a job directly through leadership, training and innovation, and clearly defined goals.

·      The impact of this was profound: in seven years, the number of individuals competitively employed rose from 4,440 in 2004 (before the policy) to 5,562 by 2011.

“The Case for Inclusion is a valuable tool for United Cerebral Palsy and advocates across the country to use as we work to advance the civil rights protections and public policies that help support individuals living with disabilities, ensuring fair and full citizenship for all Americans. This year’s report shows in great detail the states are able to provide services and supports that result in better outcomes for people with disabilities, as well as three case studies that can serve as road maps to success,” said Stephen Bennett, former President & CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “It is our hope that the Case for Inclusion can be used to strengthen the efforts of states and advocates to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities.”

Using the interactive website, users can:

·      Compare state & national data.

·      View state scorecards.

·      Interact with the ranking map.

·      See highlights of the 2013 report, the top and bottom 10 states, most improved states and those with biggest drops, and facts about the best performing states.

·      Learn how to use the report to advocate for areas needing improvement in states, and promote achievements that maintain high quality outcomes, like eliminating waiting lists and closing large institutions.

·      View in-depth information about each of the states feature in the case studies: Massachusetts, Kansas and Washington State.

·      Users can pull individual state outcomes and measures, track each state’s performance over time, and compare states among one another and to the U.S. average. The Case for Inclusion data, tables and graphs are exportable and printable as needed for personal and professional use.

# # #

About United Cerebral Palsy

 

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE        

CONTACT:
Kaelan Richards: 202-973-7175,

UCP’S NEW REPORT SHOWS PROGRESS, FAILURES OF STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

The Case for Inclusion analyzes and ranks states on services for Americans with intellectual and development disabilities

Washington, DC (May 23, 2012) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released The Case for Inclusion today, an annual report that tracks the progress of community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), and there will be a press briefing at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT). Author Tarren Bragdon will provide insight into the rankings and data, which advocacy groups and individuals can use to raise awareness for key outcomes for people with disabilities.

  • Toll-free: 1-888-450-5996
  • Participant passcode: 786597


The findings for 2012 reveal that:

  1. While progress has been made, there is room for improvement: 36 states can now show that 80% of the individuals with ID/DD in their states are served in the community;
  2. States are becoming more involved in ensuring the quality of the services they provide: 29 states have established a comprehensive quality assurance program to measure the outcomes of the community services they deliver; and
  3. But there is still more to do, particularly in providing services: waiting lists for critical community services continue to climb with more than a quarter of a million, (268,000), people with ID/DD.

 

The 2012 report shows that the states with the best services and supports for Americans living with disabilities are Arizona, Michigan and California. The lowest performing states are Arkansas, Texas and Mississippi, which have remained at the bottom of the rankings since The Case for Inclusion was first published in 2006.

While many states appear to be financially stable, the coming intersection of an aging population, people living with disabilities, and limited financial resources will have a significant impact on the country.

The report examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, UCP is able to develop a comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

Since 2006, these rankings enable families, advocates, the media and policymakers to fully understand each state’s progress or lack of improvement, and help to protect successful efforts against unwise funding cuts, as well as guide future reforms to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for these, and ultimately all, Americans.

“Each year, UCP publishes The Case for Inclusion as part of its continuing efforts to advocate for civil rights protections and public policies that provide support for individuals living with disabilities, ensuring fair and full citizenship for all Americans,” said former UCP President & CEO, Stephen Bennett. “The Case for Inclusion clearly identifies the states that are successful in providing the supports and services that people living with disabilities need, as well as states that are struggling. I urge all states and advocates to utilize The Case for Inclusion as a tool to strengthen their efforts, and to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities.”

New online features, reports and data:
The 2012 report, in addition to data from all previous reports since 2006, is available on UCP’s website using a robust new web module and design at ucp.org/public-policy/the-case-for-inclusion. Users can:

  • Compare state & national data
  • View state scorecards
  • Interact with the ranking map
  • See highlights of the 2012 report, top and bottom 10 states, most improved states and those with biggest drops, and  facts about the best performing states
  • Advocate for areas needing improvement in states, and promote achievements that maintain high quality outcomes, like eliminating waiting lists and closing large institutions
  • Download the full 2012 report and previous reports

 

Users can pull individual state outcomes and measures, track each state’s performance over time, and compare states among one another and to the US average. The Case for Inclusion data, tables and graphs are exportable and printable as needed for personal and professional use.

Importance, methodology and advocacy:
In the 1999 case Olmstead v. L.C., the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that institutionalizing individuals living with disabilities that can benefit from, and want to live in the community, was discrimination. The Case for Inclusion was developed in response to this decision, and ranks how well each state’s Medicaid programs serve Americans with ID/DD. These individuals, including the aging, deserve the same freedoms and quality of life as all Americans.

In rankings, each state and DC is analyzed and ranked based on five key outcome areas: promoting independence, tracking quality and safety, keeping families together, promoting productivity, and reaching those in need.

Significant takeaways from the 2012 ranking:

  1. All states still have room for improvement, but some states have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#48), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50);
  2. 36 states now meet the 80/80 Community standard, which means that at least 80% of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community, and 80% of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for community support;
  3. As of 2010, 11 states have no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon (new this year), Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and D.C. In addition, Minnesota closed its last remaining institution in June 2011, and another 12 states have only one institution each;
  4. 22 states now meet the 80% Home-like Setting standard, which means that at least 80% of all individuals with ID/DD are served in their own home, a family home, family foster care, shared apartments, or in other small group settings with fewer than three residents;
  5. 29 states participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) model, a comprehensive quality assurance program that includes standard measures to asses outcomes of services (nationalcoreindicators.org);
  6. Only 15 states were supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). This is important because those support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together and people with disabilities living in a community setting;
  7. Just nine states have at least one-third (33%) of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment, which best recognize and support work as key to a meaningful life. These states include Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Michigan, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Washington; and
  8. Waiting lists for critical services continue to climb and show the unmet need of individuals living with ID/DD and their families. More than a quarter of a million people (268,000) are on a waiting list for Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). To address this need, states’ HCBS programs would need to collectively increase by 46%.

 

# # #

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

United Cerebral Palsy Releases 2010 Case For Inclusion

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact:
Lauren Cozzi
(202) 973-7114 (direct)
(203) 858-5292 (cell)
LCozzi@ucp.org

 

5th Annual Report Ranks 50 States & DC on
Medicaid Services for Individuals with Disabilities

Washington, DC (April 13, 2010) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) today released the 2010 Case for Inclusionreport (http://medicaid.ucp.org/), ranking all 50 states and the District of Columbia for Medicaid services provided to intellectual and developmental disability (ID/DD) populations. The fifth annual rankings reveal:

  1. Despite significant progress, all states have room to improve outcomes and services for individuals with ID/DD, particularly in the current economic climate.
  2. Too many Americans with ID/DD still do not live in the community, although real and notable progress have been made since last year.
  3. Certain states are making substantial progress toward inclusion.
  4. Too much money is still spent isolating people in large institutions, with nominal change since 2009.
  5. Waiting lists have increased dramatically, but performance is quite mixed by state; most are not serving everyone in need.

 

“The 2010 Case for Inclusion finds some progress in Medicaid services for individuals with disabilities, and offers states and advocates a tremendous resource for further inclusion of all people with disabilities,” said Stephen Bennett, former President & CEO, United Cerebral Palsy.

Top/bottom ten states in terms of quality of Medicaid service provided: 1) Arizona; 2) Vermont; 3) New Hampshire; 4) Washington; 5) California; 6) Massachusetts; 7) Michigan; 8) Connecticut; 9) Colorado; 10) Hawaii; 42) Virginia; 43) Ohio; 44) Indiana; 45) Tennessee; 46) Utah; 47) DC; 48) Illinois; 49) Texas; 50) Arkansas; 51) Mississippi

Seventeen states shifted by at least five places in the rankings from 2009 to 2010, and 21 states shifted at least six places in the rankings from 2007 to 2010.

Highlights:

  • An impressive 22 states – up three from 2009 and an increase from 16 states in 2007 – have more than 80% of those served living in home-like settings.
  • From 2005 to 2008, an impressive 13 states reduced the number of Americans living in large institutions by 20% or more.
  • Overall the number of Americans with ID/DD on waiting lists for residential services has increased 56% from 2005 to 2008.
  • This report focuses on what is being achieved; not how much or how little money is being spent. While current Federal Stimulus funds have alleviated Medicaid spending pressures at the state level to a large extent, Medicaid shortfalls are projected to come roaring back in 2011, if the temporary increase in Medicaid funds run out.

 

About United Cerebral Palsy
Founded over 60 years ago by parents of children with cerebral palsy, today UCP is a leading service provider and advocate for children and adults with disabilities. The UCP mission is to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities through an affiliate network of approximately 100 local service providers reaching over 176,000 individuals daily in the U.S. and internationally. The national office in Washington, DC advocates on behalf of individuals with disabilities; advances federal disability public policy (Disability Policy Collaboration); and develops forward-thinking programs like Life Without Limits and My Child Without Limits. For more information, please visit www.UCP.org.

About Author
Tarren Bragdon has been involved in healthcare policy research and analysis for over a decade. His work has been featured in newspapers and media outlets nationwide including The Wall Street Journal, New York Post, New York Sun and PBS. He served two terms in the Maine House of Representatives on the Health and Human Services Committee and currently serves as chair of the board of directors of Spurwink Services, one of the largest social service providers in Maine.