Thoughts on the Future of Healthcare

This blog was written from the personal experience of UCP’s Winter Intern surrounding the future of healthcare. This post is intended to express their personal thoughts and experiences. 

On February 7, 2017, I had the opportunity to attend my first press conference as United Cerebral Palsy (UCP)’s programs and development intern. The conference was held by the Committee on Education & The Workforce at the U.S. Capitol. The speakers included several Members of Congress, as well as school nurses and parent advocates. The experience was unforgettable, marking the first time I actually got to witness what goes on behind the scenes of health policy.

As an aspiring primary care physician, health care policy has always meant more to me than simple legislation. When policy changes are made, it directly impacts how doctors can perform their care and how patients can access it. I think it is extremely important that people understand and take charge of their own health, and this is made possible through expansions in health education and health access. Being at the Capitol, and feeling immersed in the actual political process with regards to health, showed me how important it is to continue advocating for these goals– and for my future patients.

One of the stories that particularly touched me at the event was that of parent advocate Anna Crone. She spoke to the room about her daughter who was born with type 1 diabetes. Part of her treatment requires receiving daily insulin injections, and having her finger pricked up to 10 times a day to check her blood glucose levels. In 2012, before the ACA was fully implemented, Crone’s husband had lost his job and was attempting to shop for private insurance. However, he was unable to find anything due to the fact that most insurance companies denied coverage at any cost for those living with pre-existing conditions. He was eventually able to find a job and get back on private insurance, however the family said they felt a significant ease of mind knowing that their daughter would never fully lose coverage thanks to the ACA.

From this story, along with others, I began to truly understand the degree to which the ACA has impacted millions of Americans. As in the case of Anna’s husband, life may get in the way when one least expects it, and it is important to know that you or those you love will still be protected. I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to better understand the complexities of our government; and, I know that this will serve to make me a better health advocate for not only individuals with disabilities, but for all.

Supreme Court Decision a Big Win for People with Disabilities

UCP Applauds Decision to Uphold Pillar of Affordable Care Act

UCP applauds the decision made by the U.S. Supreme Court this morning upholding a key pillar of the Affordable Care Act: the availability of subsidies to participants in federally-established health care exchanges as intended by Congress.

The Supreme Court’s opinion in King v. Burwell, decides the question of whether the Affordable Care Act precludes the IRS from extending subsidies to participants in states that have not set up their own health insurance exchanges. The Fourth Circuit had previously held that the text of the ACA — stating that subsidies were available to exchanges “established by the State” — should be interpreted to make subsidies available to participants in federally established exchanges as well. The Court affirmed the Fourth Circuit, maintaining the status quo.

People with disabilities are especially impacted by the decision. Prior to the ACA, many people with disabilities were denied coverage due to a pre-existing condition or were priced out of the insurance market. A large number of people with disabilities are not in the labor force and lack access to employer sponsored insurance. And in many states with large populations of people with disabilities, the states refused to set up exchanges leading to the establishment of the federal exchange. The ability to take advantage of credits and subsidies offered through the federal exchange is critical to ensuring that the exchanges can continue to provide affordable health insurance.

“The Court’s opinion is a big win for people with disabilities and their families and caregivers,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “For those who need to purchase health care coverage through the federal exchange – including many caregivers who have given up employer sponsored benefits in order to care for their loved ones with disabilities, affordable health care is a must. No family should go broke because they or their loved one has a medical need.”

In the 6-3 opinion by Chief Justice Roberts, Justice Scalia dissented, joined by Justices Thomas and Alito.