UCP of Michigan Staff Invited to Attend Meeting Called by The Pope

Special thanks to Glenn Ashley, retired staff from UCP, for his assistance in working to help put this post together. 

UCP of Michigan’s Public Policy Specialist, Barb Valliere, was invited to attend the U.S. Regional Meeting of Popular Movements (RMOPM), which ran from February 16-19 in Modesto, CA.Part of international movements called by the Pope, the meeting in California brought together nearly 700 leaders from clergy members to grassroots leaders to provide input on a variety of social issues, including: job access and inclusion for people with disabilities, environmental issues, and racism. This meeting was the third in a series of international meetings (the previous two were held in Rome and Bolivia) aimed at bringing together members of the clergy and grassroots activists. For Barb, while the journey to California marked her first time on a plane, as Catholic woman with cerebral palsy it was an opportunity she could not pass up.

Ms. Valliere was one of three people invited from the Lansing, MI area to attend the meeting. Her invitation was a result of her leadership and work in community organizing efforts at the state and national levels. Initially, no one from the area was scheduled to speak, however, an issue with accessibility changed all of that. After requesting to be put in an accessible room, Barb was put in a room that was not accessible for her. The conference organizers were able to rectify the problem and accommodate her with another room. RMOPM asked her if she would like to address the entire assembly at dinner about the problem and her experience as person with a disability.


In her remarks to the assembly, she emphasized the importance of civil rights for people with disabilities. Attendees were reminded that when they plan events and invite people, to make sure to take care of their needs and have the event accessible to all, and to not assume that a space is accessible on word alone. She also encouraged other individuals with disabilities to advocate for yourself to ensure that your needs are met. Ms. Valliere made her point in community organizing fashion, encouraging event participants to move deeper into a  discussion on access and issues that affect the disability community.

 

Information for the blog was taken from movimientospopulares.org‘s press release.

UCP Celebrates the 17th Anniversary of The Olmstead Decision

 

The outcome of the Olmstead v. L.C. case began in Georgia where two women, Lois Curtis and Elaine Wilson, saw constant segregation due to their intellectual disabilities. Their frequent trips to state mental hospitals brought attention to the fact that community support and personal choice for individuals with disabilities was lackluster, almost nonexistent. After being represented by an attorney at the Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Lois, and later Elaine, saw her position for removal of institutional bias being taken up to the U.S. Supreme Court for consideration.

It was found under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), that discrimination against an individual with disabilities was illegal, and that the behavior portrayed towards both Curtis and Wilson held both legal and moral conflict.

 

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Under the Olmstead decision, The Court stated that individuals with disabilities have rights that are inclusive of:

  • Prohibition in the segregation of individuals with disabilities in community living
  • The ability to receive services in integrated environments
    • Services received may be appropriate to individual needs
  • The ability to receive community based services rather than institutionally based ones, in the event that:
    • Community placement is the appropriate course of action
    • The individual in question does not oppose to the treatment being offered
    • The individual’s placement can be accommodated in a reasonable manner

 

As a section under the ADA, the Olmstead decision follows the anti-discriminatory nature that the ADA set many years ago. The ADA, which celebrates its 26th signing anniversary, prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in a number of areas that include transportation, employment, government activities, and more. According to the Olmstead decision, unjustified segregation would violate Title II of the ADA, which stated that individuals with disabilities may not be discriminated against when it came to State and local government provided public services. This gave individuals with disabilities the right to choose where they were to live, instead of having economic factors coerce them into making decisions they may not otherwise wish to make. The Olmstead decision tied together the anti-discriminatory nature of the ADA by not legally binding individuals with disabilities to be institutionalized, meaning that there legally cannot be a system that will inevitably end up with a majority of the disability community in institutions.

For individuals with disabilities, these acts held the power to allow them to work in traditional office environments, live in community settings that foster independent lifestyles, receive equal opportunities when it came to a variety of traditionally implemented services, and most importantly, have the right to decide where to live, without economic or legal influences.

Here at UCP, we appreciate the previously implemented and ongoing efforts for integration, habilitation, and opportunity for expansion for those who live with disabilities. Many of our affiliates provide services that both directly and indirectly relate to the Olmstead decision. For example, most of our affiliates offer community living based services. Outlined below are a sampling of specific services that follow ideals set by the Olmstead decision.

 

 

  • Within the UCP of Central Pennsylvania lies In-Home and Community Support Programs, which offer a variety of training and support to individuals with disabilities in the realm of opportunities that allow them to participate further in the community around them. These community integration and in-home habilitation programs allow for an individual to feel as though they can be cared for and supported throughout processes in any environment that they choose. It need not have to be an institution that can provide habilitation, but rather, it can occur within the home, simultaneously alongside community support options.

 

  • Through UCP of Central Arizona, the Summer Program, as an extension of the Day Treatment and Training for Kids and Teens Program, works on even further enhancement and training of social, community, cognitive, and communication skills for kids and teens. This program focuses on the individual needs of each child, and exposes each individual to real life scenarios in preparation for community integration. This program, along with many other of it’s kind, provides services of transportation to and from the individual’s home/school, making it clear that such services, again, are not contingent upon whether or not an individual is residing at home or within an institution. Usually, habilitation skills are not necessarily provided for children outside of an institution setting, however, as can be seen from such programs, not only is the child free to reside wherever he/she may desire, but he/she may also be provided with many character building and habilitation services that otherwise would confine them to institutions.

 

In addition to skill specific programs, services such as Child Development, Respite Care, and Early Intervention are made available in a location of the individual’s choice, making it clear that community integration, and most of all, personal choice, is the priority when it comes to the creation and reformation of programs focused towards individuals with disabilities.

While disability rights and removal of bias and segregation from the disability community has seen great progress, there is much still much to be done.  On the 17th anniversary of the signing of the Olmstead decision, we at UCP wish to not only celebrate, but also take part in movements that further advocate for the rights that all individuals are entitled to.

We want to hear how the Olmstead decision has impacted your life! Share your stories using the hashtag #OlmsteadAction on social media.

Find out more information on the Administration for Community Living’s celebration of the Olmstead Anniversary here. 

UCP’s 2016 Annual Conference in Las Vegas!

United Cerebral Palsy held its Annual Conference on April 4-6, 2016 at the Vdara Hotel and Spa in Las Vegas. This year’s theme for the conference was “Going All In.” UCP affiliates from across the country gathered to take part in this year’s conference with a special focus on the future of UCP.

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Rupal Patel, PhD., founder of VocalID giving the keynote address at UCP’s Annual Conference on April 5, 2016 in Las Vegas.

The first full day of the conference began with the opening plenary on innovation and technology. Featured speakers included: Bruce Borenstein, CEO of AfterShockz, a company that creates headphones which use vibrations to communicate sound, unlike typical over-the-ear or in-ear headphones. Mr. Borenstein gave one of three keynote addresses, which centered on using technology to create accessibility to better the lives of people with disabilities and their families. 

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David Carucci, Executive Director of UCP of San Diego was the recipient of the Kathy O. Maul Leadership Award, pictured with Anita Porco, Vice President of Affiliate Network and Stephen Bennett, President/CEO of UCP National at the evening reception held on April 4, 2016.

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Bruce Borenstein, President and CEO of AfterShockz giving the opening keynote address at on April 5, 2016 at UCP’s Annual Conference in Las Vegas.

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Rick Forkosh, CEO of UCP Heartland being honored at the evening reception at UCP’s Annual Conference on April 4, 2016 in Las Vegas.

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Jeff Snyder, CEO of UCP of Central California being honored at the evening reception on April 4, 2016.

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Dr. Homayoon Kazerooni presenting on SuitX at the Opening Session at UCP’s Annual Conference held on April 5, 2016 .

Dr. Rupal Patel, another keynote speaker, gave the audience a glimpse of the amazing work that is being done at her company, VocalID.  Finally, Dr. Homayoon Kazerooni of SuitX spoke about the advancements on gait training for those living with CP, and the work of SuitX to try and create customized, user-friendly experiences for all. During the evening, a reception was held where we recognized our retiring Executive
Directors and CEOs. Jeff Snyder, CEO of UCP of Central California, was honored along with Linda Johns, Executive Director of UCP of East Central Alabama; Rick Forkosh, CEO of UCP of Hartland; Carol Hahn, Executive Director of UCP of Nebraska; and Les Leech, CEO of UCP of Southwest Florida. A special congratulations goes to Dave Carucci, Executive Director of UCP of San Diego on receiving the Kathy O. Maul Leadership Award, which honors one outstanding executive director each year.

A “Town Hall” style meeting was held on Tuesday April 5, 2016. This was an opportunity for our affiliates to come together and voice their thoughts and opinions, as well as to discuss the future of UCP.  We celebrated our Awards for Excellence winners at a special luncheon. The Awards for Excellence Luncheon recognizes the hard work and time of the wonderful volunteers who donate their time to our affiliates across the country.

The Nina Eaton Program of the Year Award was awarded to UCP of Oregon and Southwest Washington for their Employment Solutions Program. The Ethel Hausman Award went to Maren Jacobs of UCP of Berkshire County. The Ethel Hausman Award honors a local UCP volunteer who has made an outstanding contribution to UCP and to the quality of life of people with disabilities through their work.The Outstanding Youth Award was presented to Rachel Prior for the volunteer work with UCP of Greater Cleveland. The “Life Without Limits” Award was presented to Phillip Evans.

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Rachel Prior accepting The Outstanding Youth Award for her work with UCP of Cleveland.

After the Awards for Excellence Luncheon, affiliates were invited to take part in facilitated small group discussions. These discussions also served as an opportunity to give thoughts and opinions on the future of UCP and the affiliate network.

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Phillip Evans receiving the “Life Without Limits” Award at UCP’s Awards for Excellence Luncheon on April 5, 2016.

Breakout sessions were held on the last day of the conference. The topics for the breakout sessions included: The Future of Early Childhood Intervention with Dr. Jim Blackman, Medical Consultant for UCP; “Making It Work,” featuring The Employment Workgroup, which discussed employment for people with disabilities; and “ABC’s of Caregiving” presented by UCP’s Director of Advocacy, Jennifer McCue. “ABC’s of Caregiving” focused on the recent ruling from the Department of Labor on overtime for caregivers.  Stephen Bennett, CEO of UCP National, presented on the “The State of Disability Today.” This was a special session held for our sponsors and exhibitors to learn more about the current disability community and as a business how they can best serve them.  Finally, there was a special STEPtember 2016 breakfast, where attendees learned about the changes to STEPtember for this year and how to make it as lucrative and beneficial as possible for participating affiliates.

The winners for our
“Exhibitor Bingo” were also announced at the end of the conference.
Congratulations to the winners: Chris Adams of Stepping Stones, Inc. in Cincinnati; Mike Ward of UCP of Metro Detroit; Lynn Carpentier of Gillette Children’s Specialty Hospital/UCP of Minnesota; Monica Elsbrock of UCP of Nevada; Donna Fouts of UCP of Hawaii and Dr. Dave Piltz of UCP of West Central Wisconsin. A special thank you to Convaid, Troy Technologies, and AfterShockz for their generous donations for our “Exhibitor Bingo.” The prizes totaled over $6,000 and will given directly to clients in each affiliate’s territory.
Thank you to all who helped to make this year’s Annual Conference such a success!

 

 

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

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UCP’s 2015 Annual Conference Wrap Up

UCP’s 2015 Annual Conference, “Reflecting Our Mission, Focusing Our Vision,” concluded in Chicago on Friday with nearly 200 leaders of UCP’s membership gathering to discuss current affairs, honor distinguished colleagues and supporters and share knowledge to improve the network.

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Several special guests, including UCP Celebrity Youth Ambassador, RJ Mitte joined in the sessions. Mr. Mitte is best known for his role a Walter White, Jr. in AMC’s “Breaking Bad.” He actively supports disability causes and speaks about his experiences as an actor with a disability to raise awareness. He just  wrapped several feature films over the last year, including DIXIELAND starring alongside Faith Hill and Riley Keough, which just premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2015 and was first role he’s portrayed a character without a disability.

In addition to sharing his views on the future for people with disabilities in a session called “Reflecting on Our History, Focusing on our Future,” he presented UCP’s annual Outstanding Youth Award honoring Daniel Lopez and Lake Periman and Life Without Limits Award honoring O’Ryan Case. Daniel and Lake have made a huge impact on their central Florida community of Lake Mary, raising thousands of dollars for United Cerebral Palsy of Central Florida over the past four years. They have worked tirelessly to organize events and engage the media and their community to raise awareness about cerebral palsy. O’Ryan Case is an individual with CP who has demonstrated leadership and achievement to such a degree that he is a significant role model to people with and without disabilities through his work at UCP’s national office.

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Dr. Eva Ritvo was awarded with the Volunteer of the Year Award for her work and efforts for UCP of South Florida. And, Dr. Charlie Law and UCP of Greater Birmingham were recognized for their Life Without Limits clinic with the Outstanding Program of the Year award.

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Lake_RJ_DanielAlso, UCP was honored to hear from Joe Russo, Deputy Commissioner from the Chicago Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities who spoke about the ADA’s 25th Anniversary celebration in Chicago. He joined a panel with Mr. Mitte, CEO of UCP of NYC Ed Matthews and the venerable Jack Schillinger to discuss the past, present and future of UCP.RJ_Joe Russo_Gloria_Armando_Central AZ
Jack Schillinger, Chair Emeritus of UCP of South Florida and current Bellows Fund Chair celebrated his 95th birthday with the honor of UCP’s Chair Award given by Gloria Johnson Cusack in recognition of the direct impact he has had on the lives of people with disabilities and their families during his long career.

Linda Johns, CEO of East Central Alabama United Cerebral Palsy was given one of the most prestigious honors this year, receiving the Kathleen O. Maul Leadership Award. This is presented to an affiliate leader who embodies the leadership characteristics that were embraced by Executive Director, Kathy Maul, for whom the award is named.Maul Award Winner

On Wednesday evening, the attendees were joined by the winning teams who competed in UCP Life Lab’s Innovation Lab, held on Tuesday and Wednesday And, on Thursday evening, UCP held a special screening of “Margarita With a Straw” – a critically-acclaimed film about a woman with cerebral palsy. The movie was inspired by the daughter of Sathi Alur, a member of the World Cerebral Palsy Institute who held an informal Q & A session after the screening.

Enjoy more photos from the event on UCP’s Facebook page and make your plans now to join us next spring in Las Vegas for the 2016 Annual Conference (dates to be determined).

UCP Thanks Our Sponsors!

Merz Pharmaceuticals

MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning

Careerbuilder

Therap

Uber

Infinitec, a Program of UCP Seguin of Greater Chicago

Ability Magazine and Abilityjobs.com

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What Do YOU Know about UCP?

United Cerebral Palsy: Life without limits for people with disabilities

What do YOU know about UCP? We’re a network of affiliated nonprofit organizations working to ensure a Life without Limits™ for both children and adults with a broad range of disabilities and their families.

Tell Us More About The UCP Network.

UCP’s approximately nearly 80 affiliated organizations range from large providers like Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare in Minnesota, to smaller but no less impactful organizations from New England to California. Our affiliates’ influence can be felt as far away as Canada and Australia.

Each organization acts independently to provide the advocacy, support and services needed in their communities. Many have programs in place to address direct needs for therapy, housing, transportation, employment and family support. Many spend time advocating for public policy changes at the local, state and even national level. Many work to raise awareness of the issues facing people with disabilities and their families, and all work to secure the necessary resources to carry out UCP’s mission.

Who, Exactly, Do You Serve?

UCP is proud to serve people with a range of disabilities, their families, and by extension their communities. Sometimes, you will hear that 65% of the people served by UCP affiliates have disabilities in addition to, or other than, cerebral palsy. While percentages vary by affiliate and can change over the years, the truth is that UCP places a priority on serving people in need, regardless of diagnosis. UCP providers typically serve people with the most severe and multiple disabilities.24JL04GD

At the national level, UCP advocates for change in public policy. And, we work to raise awareness of the major issues common to many people with disabilities: access, resources, support and respect. At the local level, UCP affiliates work hard to provide the supports and services most needed in their communities. Their capacity to serve is only bound by the resources they have available.

If You Serve People with All Disabilities, Why Are You Called United Cerebral Palsy?

We are proud of our heritage. United Cerebral Palsy’s name has a long history, going back to 1949. In the 1940s, there were not many options for families of and people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities. What began as the brainstorm of a few parents of children with cerebral palsy quickly grew in to a nationwide crusade to improve the lives of people with all disabilities. From it’s inception, UCP brought issues about cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities to the forefront of the national media.

While the words “United Cerebral Palsy” do not fully express the scope of our work, UCP has served as a trusted name for millions of people for more than 60 years. As with many iconic brands, which have grown and evolved over time, the true heart of our identity lies in the associations people make when they hear our name, not in the name itself.11JE04GD

Why Don’t You Just Focus on Cerebral Palsy?

Because more than 176,000 people rely on UCP every day. If we can advocate for a public policy that provides access to more affordable housing options for with disabilities, should we apply that policy only to people with CP? If we can encourage respect for all people, should we only try to put an end to bullying against children with CP? If we can inspire an innovator to design a device that is more accessible, should we insist that only people with CP be able to use it? United Cerebral Palsy works hard to help individuals overcome barriers to a Life Without Limits™, and we have found that sometimes the biggest barriers of all are the ones that come with assigning labels and defining limits.