Reflecting on the ADA with UCP Staff and Interns

Coauthored by Sara Shemali and James O’Connor

Two women pose for a photo in front of the Capitol Building. One of the women is using an electric wheelchair.

“When I was 15 or 16 years old my best friend, my sister and I decided to go out for ice cream. We went to a new shop in the town nearby. Even though it was a new building, it was an old style ice cream shop that had been built to invoke that aesthetic; and, there was no ramp in the front of the store– only steps. The only ramp was in the back, leading up to the emergency exit. The employees told us they weren’t allowed to let us in through the back door. We were shocked but, after arguing and getting nowhere, we went someplace else. When we got home, I was still pretty upset. When my mom asked what happened, we told her the story. And she explained to me that what I had experienced was discrimination and illegal under the ADA. I think that was the first time I really understood what the ADA meant for me as a person with a disability.“

 

This is what our supervisor, Karin Hitselberger, said when asked about her most memorable experience of the ADA as a child. We spoke to her and Kaitlyn Meuser, the Marketing Specialist here at United Cerebral Palsy’s National Office, right before today’s 27th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) because we wanted to gain insight into the many ways that the ADA has shaped the experiences of individuals with disabilities in America.

 

As Program and Development interns for UCP’s National Office, James and I started our summer with a lot to learn about the history of the disability rights movement. We both carried what turned out to be fairly common misconceptions about the ADA, and we asked Karin and Kaitlyn, who both happen to have cerebral palsy, about some of those most common misconceptions.

 

For me, learning more about the ADA throughout my internship, I realized just how comprehensive of a piece of legislation the ADA is. Whereas some may know it only as the law that regulates curb cuts and ramps, or just an anti-discrimination law, in reality it serves both of those purposes in addition to many more. Karin continued by highlighting just how multifaceted the ADA is. She pointed out the misconception and tendency to discuss the ADA in only one of its many capacities, without appreciating the diverse avenues in which it helps individuals with disabilities.

 

Karin also discussed the pivotal role that individuals with disabilities played in crafting the ADA. While the role of passionate allies cannot be overlooked, the engagement of individuals who encounter the barriers that the ADA addresses daily was crucial to passing the ADA law that we know today.

 

As a person without a disability, I had experienced the ADA in action even before I became an intern at UCP, although I had always witnessed it as an outside observer. One vivid memory I will always remember is a neighbor of mine, with cerebral palsy, whose mother had to advocate for him to be involved in gym class, and given the reasonable accommodations he needed to participate. Gym class was a privilege I had always taken for granted, but he had to fight to be afforded the opportunity I had. Interning at UCP has allowed me to step out of my bystander role and become more informed and involved on issues related to disability. Instances of discrimination in schools, hiring, and the workplace still occur today, but one point both Karin and Kaitlyn brought up was that because of the passage of the ADA, such discrimination is illegal (such as refusal to provide reasonable accommodations), and action can be taken to stop these practices. The ADA sets a baseline: a clear standard for inclusion, which is not only vital in itself but also opens the door to continue the conversation about disability and the next steps towards truly equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities.

 

My fellow intern James shares his perspective below:

 

When I started my summer here at UCP National, I was at least aware of the existence of the ADA, but was not even close to understanding its importance. As I have gotten to know more people who have been personally impacted by this legislation, and learned more about the history of the disability rights movement, I’ve come to understand how transformative the ADA has been to the disability community. It has enabled so many people to work, travel, and access the world around them.

 

My experience at UCP has allowed me to connect the curb-cuts and accessible elevators, that I see everyday, to the freedom and rights of the friends I have made here. I’ve had the pleasure of traveling to and from various events with Karin, who uses a wheelchair, and have had to rethink so much that I previously took for granted. I now find myself constantly looking for ramps and elevators, and generally reevaluating the accessibility of my surroundings. It really has fundamentally changed the way that I see the world, and I feel that I am beginning to understand how important the ADA is as a result.

 

Although the ADA is a much-needed starting point for legislation regarding disability, Karin and Kaitlyn agree there is more work that needs to be done to remove substantial barriers that individuals with disabilities still face. Getting into buildings is a right that needs to be afforded to individuals with disabilities, but access to the building itself is not the end of accessibility. Karin points out that physically having the ability to get into a movie theatre isn’t enough if a wheelchair user wouldn’t have anywhere to sit, or if there are no closed captions for someone who is Deaf. Cultural inclusion and universal design for individuals with disabilities are both still a work in progress.

 

While there is work remaining to continue to advance the rights of people with disabilities, it is of paramount importance to reflect on how much closer the ADA has brought us towards the ideals of equality and civil rights for all people.

ADA Education and Reform Act

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a historic piece of civil rights legislation for  individuals with disabilities, was passed 27 years ago this week. Since that time, individuals with disabilities have been able to seek enforcement of the law to ensure that they have access to public spaces.

 

The ADA helps to curb the discrimination faced by people with disabilities but Congress is currently considering the ADA Education and Reform Act, a bill that would change the ADA: granting more leniency to businesses, and prolonging the process of remedying ADA failures by these businesses. The bill is controversial and many advocates for people with disabilities are speaking up against it.

 

Supporters of the bill seek to remedy the issue of “drive by” lawsuits, a term used to describe when a person goes to a business for the singular purpose of filing a lawsuit under the ADA. These lawsuits are seen by many as solely efforts of financial gain at the expense of businesses, instead of efforts to resolve legitimate barriers to access for individuals with disabilities. While the existence of such lawsuits is problematic, there is no consensus on the best way to address this issue.

 

The bill would allow business owners a “pause in litigation,” giving them 60 days to acknowledge their violation of the ADA, and then another 120 days to make “substantial progress” towards remedying the issue. The bill, currently being considered in the house, has 14 co-sponsors from both sides of the aisle. Although not an issue that is divisive along party lines, the bill does not draw universal support because of its civil rights and practical implications.

 

While the supporters of the bill seek to protect businesses, its opponents strive to protect the civil rights of individuals with disabilities. The ADA has been recognized as a crucial step towards inclusion and civil rights for individuals with disabilities, and its importance for individuals with disabilities cannot be overstated. It would be reasonable to assume that individuals with disabilities would support legislation which strengthened the ADA—the very legislation that guarantees them civil rights. Yet, individuals in the disability community and their advocates are opposed to the poorly-named ADA Education and Reform Act.

 

As a reminder, the ADA does not require the payment of monetary damages to individuals with disabilities when a violation occurs. Rather, it is a handful of states that have laws which allow monetary damages, which is how “drive by” lawsuits became profitable for plaintiffs in those states.

 

This proposed law would amend the ADA by requiring an individual with a disability to submit a special notice to the business. The individual would have to consult a legal adviser to craft the notice, and include the specific sections of the ADA that are being violated. Thus, the burden rests on the individual with the disability, once they are denied access to a public accommodation, to have extensive knowledge of the ADA and to seek legal counsel to provide this special notice to the business.

 

Once the notice has been provided to a business, the business has nearly six months to make any progress regarding the violation, even when the issue would not take much time or money to fix. This is the case with ADA concerns, because the ADA already contains provisions which protect businesses, only requiring that changes be made when they are readily achievable and can be done “without much difficulty or expense.” Even then, there exist extensive resources for business owners to make these changes, including a Department of Justice ADA hotline and website, and ten federally funded ADA centers which provide resources and training in every state.

 

The Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities (of which UCP is a member) opposes the bill: 

“We know of no other law that outlaws discrimination but permits entities to discriminate with impunity until victims experience that discrimination and educate the entities perpetrating it about their obligations not to discriminate. Such a regime is absurd, and would make people with disabilities second-class citizens.”

 

In short, this bill is an inefficient means to address the issue of “drive by” lawsuits, and creates substantial barriers to the enforcement of the civil rights of the world’s largest minority group, individuals with disabilities.  

 

Family-Centered Programs at UCP of Tampa Bay

 

Inclusionary education, the practice of including children both with and without disabilities in school-related settings, is becoming increasingly common in early education programs across the country.

United Cerebral Palsy’s affiliate in Tampa Bay Florida, UCP of Tampa Bay, is way ahead of the curve. Opened in 1992, their inclusionary childhood development center began as an alternative to institutionalization that gave parents of children with special needs, as well as their siblings, a convenient, structured preschool program.

25 years later, the program has blossomed into a NAC accredited developmental preschool, with a five star quality designation from the Quality Counts for Kids Program, which serves over 150 children each year. In the words of Laura White, the Executive Director of UCP of Tampa Bay, “The value of this program lies in allowing children with special needs and their siblings alike to be in a classroom setting together that builds a sense of mutual understanding and inclusion that leads to better outcomes for everyone.” Laura sees the program as an early preparation for the mainstream school system and a powerful way for young siblings to interact with other siblings as well as other children with unique needs.

In addition to the preschool program, UCP of Tampa Bay offers an inclusionary after-school program in which school aged children with disabilities and their age-appropriate (up to 8 years old) siblings are bused from school to the program, making pick-ups far easier for working parents. The program incorporates educational and occupational, physical, and speech therapies for those with special needs until they reach the age of 21. The facility features a fully accessible playground, with a wheelchair accessible swing, and a specialty decking that makes falls safer and aids accessibility. Laura estimates that, over the years, these inclusionary programs have served over two thousand children and over a thousand families.

 

Two young children in Tampa Bay at a graduation ceremony.

Two young children in Tampa Bay at a graduation ceremony.

 

Special thanks to Laura White, Executive Director of UCP of Tampa Bay.

 

To find out more about UCP of Tampa Bay and their programs, please visit their website at www.ucptampa.org.

 

Changing Spaces Aims to Bring Access and Dignity to a Universal Experience

Nobody should have to lay on the floor of a public restroom. While this may seem obvious for some, individuals with disabilities and their families are not always afforded another option. This is because they are frequently faced with bathrooms being unsanitary, cramped, and often inaccessible.

Society has acknowledged the urgency for coat and purse hangers in bathroom stalls to maintain the hygienic safety and convenience for the individual using the restroom, however, often it seems that the same thought has not been considered for some individuals with disabilities. Many times, their caregivers have to change individuals on bathroom floors because there is no other option: the only changing table in most bathrooms is meant for babies. This is not only unhygienic, but also undignified.

Even if toilets are deemed accessible, many times they do not have necessary items for many individuals such as a lift, changing table, or an accessible and supportive toilet. This may fully prevent some caregivers from being able to provide adequate toileting care. Common and important activities such as visiting family or traveling outside the home may become a truly daunting logistical challenge.

Individuals with disabilities and their caregivers are working at the state level in Georgia (Changing Spaces GA), and in other places across the world, to improve public restrooms so that they are accessible and dignified for all methods of toileting. Advocates have two very clear solutions: rather than only having baby-sized changing tables, adult-sized changing tables would be suitable for all age groups. Furthermore, a ceiling hoist would actually reduce the risk of injury when lifting people onto a table, and it does not take up any extra space in the stall (you can view the video from Changing Spaces GA here).

In a society where individuals with disabilities still experience many barriers, being able to change in a toilet stall with dignity should not be another problem that individuals have to face. Changing Spaces is more than a campaign for hygiene, it is about dignity for the individual and those who love them. It is also about providing individuals with disabilities and their caregivers access to a space that has just as much access as for anyone else, allowing them to live life more freely and without barriers; and most importantly, letting them be who they want to be.

To learn more, visit Changing Spaces GA or follow along with the discussion on social media using the hashtag #OFFTHEFLOOR.

UCP Celebrates the 17th Anniversary of The Olmstead Decision

 

The outcome of the Olmstead v. L.C. case began in Georgia where two women, Lois Curtis and Elaine Wilson, saw constant segregation due to their intellectual disabilities. Their frequent trips to state mental hospitals brought attention to the fact that community support and personal choice for individuals with disabilities was lackluster, almost nonexistent. After being represented by an attorney at the Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Lois, and later Elaine, saw her position for removal of institutional bias being taken up to the U.S. Supreme Court for consideration.

It was found under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), that discrimination against an individual with disabilities was illegal, and that the behavior portrayed towards both Curtis and Wilson held both legal and moral conflict.

 

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Under the Olmstead decision, The Court stated that individuals with disabilities have rights that are inclusive of:

  • Prohibition in the segregation of individuals with disabilities in community living
  • The ability to receive services in integrated environments
    • Services received may be appropriate to individual needs
  • The ability to receive community based services rather than institutionally based ones, in the event that:
    • Community placement is the appropriate course of action
    • The individual in question does not oppose to the treatment being offered
    • The individual’s placement can be accommodated in a reasonable manner

 

As a section under the ADA, the Olmstead decision follows the anti-discriminatory nature that the ADA set many years ago. The ADA, which celebrates its 26th signing anniversary, prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in a number of areas that include transportation, employment, government activities, and more. According to the Olmstead decision, unjustified segregation would violate Title II of the ADA, which stated that individuals with disabilities may not be discriminated against when it came to State and local government provided public services. This gave individuals with disabilities the right to choose where they were to live, instead of having economic factors coerce them into making decisions they may not otherwise wish to make. The Olmstead decision tied together the anti-discriminatory nature of the ADA by not legally binding individuals with disabilities to be institutionalized, meaning that there legally cannot be a system that will inevitably end up with a majority of the disability community in institutions.

For individuals with disabilities, these acts held the power to allow them to work in traditional office environments, live in community settings that foster independent lifestyles, receive equal opportunities when it came to a variety of traditionally implemented services, and most importantly, have the right to decide where to live, without economic or legal influences.

Here at UCP, we appreciate the previously implemented and ongoing efforts for integration, habilitation, and opportunity for expansion for those who live with disabilities. Many of our affiliates provide services that both directly and indirectly relate to the Olmstead decision. For example, most of our affiliates offer community living based services. Outlined below are a sampling of specific services that follow ideals set by the Olmstead decision.

 

 

  • Within the UCP of Central Pennsylvania lies In-Home and Community Support Programs, which offer a variety of training and support to individuals with disabilities in the realm of opportunities that allow them to participate further in the community around them. These community integration and in-home habilitation programs allow for an individual to feel as though they can be cared for and supported throughout processes in any environment that they choose. It need not have to be an institution that can provide habilitation, but rather, it can occur within the home, simultaneously alongside community support options.

 

  • Through UCP of Central Arizona, the Summer Program, as an extension of the Day Treatment and Training for Kids and Teens Program, works on even further enhancement and training of social, community, cognitive, and communication skills for kids and teens. This program focuses on the individual needs of each child, and exposes each individual to real life scenarios in preparation for community integration. This program, along with many other of it’s kind, provides services of transportation to and from the individual’s home/school, making it clear that such services, again, are not contingent upon whether or not an individual is residing at home or within an institution. Usually, habilitation skills are not necessarily provided for children outside of an institution setting, however, as can be seen from such programs, not only is the child free to reside wherever he/she may desire, but he/she may also be provided with many character building and habilitation services that otherwise would confine them to institutions.

 

In addition to skill specific programs, services such as Child Development, Respite Care, and Early Intervention are made available in a location of the individual’s choice, making it clear that community integration, and most of all, personal choice, is the priority when it comes to the creation and reformation of programs focused towards individuals with disabilities.

While disability rights and removal of bias and segregation from the disability community has seen great progress, there is much still much to be done.  On the 17th anniversary of the signing of the Olmstead decision, we at UCP wish to not only celebrate, but also take part in movements that further advocate for the rights that all individuals are entitled to.

We want to hear how the Olmstead decision has impacted your life! Share your stories using the hashtag #OlmsteadAction on social media.

Find out more information on the Administration for Community Living’s celebration of the Olmstead Anniversary here. 

World CP “Invent It” Competition Brings Together Designers to Make a “Sponge House!”

“World Cerebral Palsy Day (World CP Day)” is a worldwide project with the goal to change the world for people living with cerebral palsy and other disabilities and their families.  World CP Day is celebrated on the first Wednesday in October, yet events go on year round. This year, World CP Day aims to make a difference in the local communities of those with CP. Each year the initiative introduces different challenges. From 2012-2014, World CP Day challenged engineers and designers to invent a product that would benefit people with CP.

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This past year, the challenge was to create a ‘Sponge House’ that went beyond only being wheelchair accessible. The Sponge House needed to accommodate to a large group of people with CP by having open spaces, soft floors, rounded edges and low surfaces. The idea of the Sponge House came from 6-year-old Sally Garster who lives in England and has CP and wanted a house made from soft materials that would protect her when she falls.

Winners of the 2015 Sponge House challenge are people from all across the globe. The number one winning team is a group from Canada who created A.B.L.E (Access a Better Living Environment). This team came up with a house that includes a lot of open spaces, mobility equipment, soft surfaces, and rounded corners. The next runner up was a product called The Bubble House created by two women in Australia. This house consisted of round surfaces with furniture that is mounded into the ground to prevent slipping and falling. This house also included a soft and sponge-like floor that is soft when impacted by a fall.

Next up was a project called Super Special Living created in New York! Inspired by their son, Garner Oh and his wife designed a house that has gentle curved bars that little hands can easily grasp along with shelves that encourage reaching and pulling to stand (once they have toys on them, of course). With soft padding on the floor and walls and no sharp edges to bump into, Super Special Living is a house that will not hurt you.

Emily Gillis’ Journey to a Law Degree

Emily Gillis is set to graduate for Suffolk University Law School in Boston this coming Saturday. Emily’s law school journey has been different from most of her peers, her father, Joseph Gillis Jr., has taken her to every single class throughout her three years as a law student. Gillis was born with spastic-quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy and uses a power chair to get around.

Joseph Gillis would drive his daughter to her stop on MBTA’s Red Line everyday, often waiting patiently for hours between Emily’s classes, pick her up from the stop and drive them back to the apartment they shared together in Whitman, Massachusetts. He would often accompany Emily to her classes, helping to set up and break down her computer and would wait for her between classes, making sure she had everything she needed. When Emily was denied an aide for both school and at home, her father jumped at the chance to help his daughter succeed, already knowing how to navigate Boston, it was a perfect fit. “There are no words to describe what my dad has done for me.”, Emily says.

Emily Gillis and her dad, Joseph Gillis Jr. 2

Emily Gillis and her father, Joseph Gillis, Jr.

 

This incredible moment is about her hard work, her dedication and the support of her dad. When asked why he went to such great lengths, Joseph Gillis replied: “I think every parent would have done the same thing if they had the chance- “I’m just glad I had the opportunity to do so.” Emily graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in Criminology in 2010; she has known she wanted to become a lawyer since her freshman year of high school. Those at Suffolk Law took notice of her father’s unwavering support, Associate Dean of students, Ann McGonigle Santos said “…He has given Emily a gift to thrive and lay the foundation for her to become an attorney in whatever field she pursues.” On Saturday, she will have a full cheering section, including her mother, Mary, who’s been battling cancer for the last few years and her younger sister, Kimberly.

For both Emily and Joseph, this is the end to what Emily calls a “bittersweet” journey and a future full of great experiences that await her.

 

From all of us here at UCP: Congratulations, Emily! And best of luck with whatever path you choose to follow!

Special Thank you to Tony Ferullo from Suffolk University’s Office of Public Affairs, CBS Boston and the Boston Globe for helping to contribute to this blog post.

Innovation Lab Design Challenge Debuts

Intensive Two-Day Event from UCP’s Life Labs Coming to Chicago 

 

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) Life Labs initiative will bring an intensive, two-day design challenge called an Innovation Lab to Chicago May 19-20, 2015. Following successful events in London, Washington DC, and Sydney, Australia, the Innovation Lab (formerly called Enabled by Design-athon) brings together people from all walks of life under the principles of Universal Design to dream up the next big idea for people with and without disabilities.

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At each Innovation Lab, this diversity of talent from a variety of fields is coached to use human-centered Universal Design concepts to solve every day problems as part of a competitive yet collaborative design challenge for team prizes. Designers, engineers, inventors, makers and hackers as well as professionals and caregivers in the disability field are all encouraged to contribute their unique perspectives to the process.

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Innovation Lab Featured Speaker Paul Edlund – Microsoft Core Technologies Chief Technologist

The inaugural Innovation Lab scheduled for Chicago will take place at the Microsoft Technology Center and will be co-hosted by Smart Chicago. Smart Chicago is a civic organization devoted to improving lives in Chicago through technology by increasing access to the Internet, improving skills for using Internet, and developing meaningful products from data that measurably contribute to the quality of life of residents in the region and beyond.

“Here at Microsoft we are focused on improving the lives of citizens through technology,” said Shelley Stern Grach, Director of Civic Engagement at Microsoft. “The Innovation Lab focuses on the principles of design to provide opportunity and access to technology for diverse communities, and we’re excited to sMicrosoft Technology Center 2ee what the teams come up with.”

Teams will design and build prototypes or present plans that demonstrate how products can rapidly be created to better fit with people’s lives and needs, no matter what those need may be. UCP’s Life Labs is intent on creating a movement of accessibility for the masses so that mainstream products work for as many people as possible, including those with disabilities and older people. The Innovation Lab events are meant to challenge preconceptions of assistive equipment, showing how products can be personalized, purposeful and beautifully designed too.

“Rather than continuing to retrofit our world to accommodate people with disabilities, there’s no reason why we can’t design our world to work for people of all abilities,” said Marc Irlandez, Director of UCP’s Life Labs.

Registration is now open at http://ucpinnovationlab.org/ Space is limited.

 

Co-hosted by:

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Thanks to our sponsors:

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I Don’t Need a Cure

Daman Wandke is an accessibility analyst and disability advocate in the Washington, DC area. 

Daman Wandke

Daman Wandke

My name is Daman Wandke and I work as a User Interface Analyst at SSB BART Group, an information technology (IT) accessibility consulting company.  In this role, I provide consulting to large corporations on how to make their IT accessible.  I am also a national disability advocate, currently serving as a Board Member of PolicyWorks, where we advocate to improve public policy that would increase employment access for people with disabilities.  Previously, I served as the Student Advisory Council Chair of the US Business Leadership Network.  My advocacy efforts focus on accessible information technology and increasing disability employment.  I earned my Master of Business Administration in an accelerated one-year program. My resume includes accessibility work at many federal agencies: NOAA, USDA, NASA and FHFA. Oh…and I happen to have Cerebral Palsy (CP).

Having CP taught me how to accomplish tasks differently.  I use an electric scooter and forearm crutches for mobility.  I lack in the fine motor department, so I need help with some tasks. My speech is moderately affected by CP, so sometimes I have to get creative in verbal communication if people do not know me well. Having a disability has taught me a lot in life that has contributed to my successes.  I am a good problem solver and creative.  What do you do when you can’t use keys? Install a keyless entry lock on your apartment’s door that works with a remote, just like a car. My disability also taught me about management and teamwork. I have been hiring and managing personal care attendants since I entered college.

I recently saw a sweatshirt advertised on Facebook page dedicated to CP awareness that said: “Someone I know needs a cure.” I found that sentiment to be somewhat offensive. I am a successful 25 year old that would not be where I am today without CP. My disability is my “normal.”  Where would I be today without CP? I wouldn’t be consulting with large companies on how they can improve their IT accessibility.I wouldn’t be advocating side-by-side with national leaders for the disability community.  Yes, my body works differently but it’s not broken, nor sick, nor does it need to be cured.

Instead of a cure, let’s advocate for equality. Not only do I not want a cure, I do not want to be “baby talked” because my speech sounds a little different. I do not want to be turned away from an event because the only entrance has stairs. I do not want to have to pick between working full-time and having access to the personal care attendants. Cerebral Palsy doesn’t worsen over one’s lifetime like a disease. Let’s focus on creating a society of equal opportunity for all people with disabilities, including people with Cerebral Palsy, rather than searching for some kind of “cure.”

 

Joining Forces: UCP and Sprint Relay

Over the years Sprint Relay has responded to communication challenges in the lives of people with speech disabilities. UCP is excited to be in partnership with Sprint Relay to help promote the products and services of Sprint Relay while furthering UCP’s efforts to advance the accessibility movement for people with a spectrum of disabilities. This partnership will raise awareness of these various services and products available through Sprint Relay that can help people with a variety of hearing difficulties and people who have speech disabilities to communicate with friends and family and live as independently as possible.

Sprint is the largest and most technologically advanced Telecommunications Relay Service (TRS) provider in the nation with more than 22 years of experience. Sprint Relay services are provided to persons who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind, or who have a speech disability, and give these individuals the ability to communicate on the phone or internet. Sprint’s experience in this field ensures Sprint Relay users receive quality service regardless of the type of relay service they are using. Sprint Relay service is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with no restrictions on the number of calls placed or the length of calls. For more information, visit www.sprintrelay.com. Users with a speech disability can go to www.sprintsts.com.

“Sprint Relay and UCP share a common vision that technology can be harnessed to open up the world to individuals with disabilities,” said Stephen Bennett, former President & CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “UCP is excited to be partnering with Sprint Relay to help raise awareness of the services they provide that can really make an incredible difference in the day-to-day lives of so many people.”

“Sprint has always been committed to making communication possible for all of our customers, including those with speech disabilities. Sprint Relay delivers on this promise through our new partnership with United Cerebral Palsy who is a recognized advocate serving 170,000 clients and families every day. We look forward to working together to raise awareness about Speech-to-Speech Services available” said, Mike Ellis, Sprint Relay Director.

If you need more information about the Sprint Relay Service, please do not hesitate to contact the Sprint TRS customer service at 800-676-3777 (voice), 800-676-3777 (TTY) or send an email to Sprint.TRSCusSer@sprint.com.