LEADING DISABILITY GROUPS USE NEW MEDICAID REPORT FINDINGS & RESROURCES AS GUIDE IN ADVOCACY FOR PROGRESS, AGAINST FAILURES IN STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH ID/DD

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

Kaelan Richards, UCP: 202-973-7175,

Lara Schwartz, AAPD: 202-521-4309, lschwartz@aapd.com

LEADING DISABILITY GROUPS USE NEW MEDICAID REPORT FINDINGS & RESOURCES AS GUIDE IN ADVOCACY FOR PROGRESS, AGAINST FAILURES IN STATES SERVING AMERICANS WITH ID/DD

 

 

 

The Case for Inclusion should be used a tool to determine how to build state support and service systems that work for Americans with intellectual and development disabilities

Washington, DC (May 23, 2012) – While progress has been made and there is more quality assurance of services provided, some states are failing to adequately serve Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), according to The Case for Inclusion 2012, a new Medicaid report released today. United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) and the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) are calling on advocates to use The Case for Inclusion as a tool to determine how to build state support and service systems that work for people. The findings for 2012 reveal that:

  1. While progress has been made, there is room for improvement: 36 states can now show that 80% of the individuals with ID/DD in their states are served in the community;

     

  2. States are becoming more involved in ensuring the quality of the services they provide: 29 states have established a comprehensive quality assurance program to measure the outcomes of the community services they deliver;

     

  3. But there is still more to do, particularly in providing services: waiting lists for critical community services continue to climb with more than a quarter of a million, or 268,000, people with ID/DD.

 

The 2012 report tracks the progress of community living standards, and it shows that the states with the best services and supports for Americans living with disabilities are Arizona, Michigan and California. The lowest performing states are Arkansas, Texas and Mississippi, which have remained at the bottom of the rankings since The Case for Inclusion was first published in 2006.

While many states appear to be financially stable, the coming intersection of an aging population, people living with disabilities, and limited financial resources, will have a significant impact on the country’s entitlement programs.

The report examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, the findings develop a comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

Since 2006, these rankings enable families, advocates, the media and policymakers to fully understand each state’s progress or lack of improvement, and help to protect successful efforts against unwise funding cuts, as well as guide future reforms to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for these, and ultimately all, Americans.

“Each year, UCP publishes The Case for Inclusion as part of its continuing efforts to advocate for civil rights protections and public policies that provide support for individuals living with disabilities, ensuring fair and full citizenship for all Americans,” said former UCP President & CEO, Stephen Bennett. “The Case for Inclusion clearly identifies the states that are successful in providing the supports and services that people living with disabilities need, as well as states that are struggling. I urge all states and advocates to utilize The Case for Inclusion as a tool to strengthen their efforts, and to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities.”

“It is critical that states honor their obligations to people with disabilities by providing comprehensive and high-quality services through their Medicaid programs. That is why people with disabilities and our allies are fighting to preserve and improve Medicaid at the state and federal levels. The Case for Inclusion makes clear that some states are falling short and provides a roadmap for advocacy. AAPD encourages our community, members, and supporters to use this tool in our continued efforts to preserve the vital services and supports that enable eight million people with disabilities to live the lives we deserve,” said AAPD President and CEO Mark Perriello.

Online features, reports and data:

The 2012 report and data from all previous reports is available on UCP’s website using a robust new web module and design at ucp.org/public-policy/the-case-for-inclusion. Users can:

  • Compare state & national data
  • View state scorecards
  • Interact with the ranking map
  • See highlights of the 2012 report, top and bottom 10 states, most improved states and those with biggest drops, and  facts about the best performing states
  • Advocate for areas needing improvement in states, and promote achievements that maintain high quality outcomes, like eliminating waiting lists and closing large institutions
  • Download the full 2012 report and previous reports

 

Users can pull individual state outcomes and measures, track each state’s performance over time, and compare states among one another and to the US average. The Case for Inclusion data, tables and graphs are exportable and printable as needed for personal and professional use.

For further detail about the report itself, there will be a press briefing at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT). Author Tarren Bragdon will provide insight into the rankings and data, which advocacy groups and individuals can use to raise awareness for key outcomes for people with disabilities.

  • Toll-free: 1-888-450-5996
  • Participant passcode: 786597

 

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About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services through an affiliate network to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

 

About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)

The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), the country’s largest cross-disability membership association, organizes the disability community to be a powerful force for change – politically, economically, and socially. AAPD was founded in 1995 to help unite the diverse community of people with disabilities, including their family, friends and supporters, and to be a national voice for change in implementing the goals of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). To learn more, visit the AAPD Web site: www.aapd.com.

Disability Groups Respond to Supercommittee Failure

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

UCP Contacts:
Lauren Cozzi, 202-973-7114, 
Alicia Kubert Smith, 202-973-7168, 

AAPD Contacts:
Lara Schwartz, 202-521-4309, lschwartz@aapd.com
Frankie Mastrangelo, 202-521-4308, fmastrangelo@aapd.com

Disability Groups Respond to Supercommittee Failure

Joint Statement by Mark Perriello of the American Association of People with Disabilities and Stephen Bennett, United Cerebral Palsy

Washington, D.C. (November 21, 2011) — “Since the Supercommittee was formed, Americans from all walks of life have spoken loud and clear: we support tangible, responsible solutions that preserve opportunity. The budget debate has moved from the Supercommittee to party leaders and back again, and has now apparently ground to a halt. Rigid adherence to ideology is again coming at the expense of every-day Americans who need their representatives to get something done. Instead of solutions, we’re left with uncertainty about the future. Today, real people who are already making do with very little are left to wonder if deficit reduction will result in opportunity reduction. Today’s news has not changed the fact that we need to protect our fiscal future and our national security while at the same time preserving essential lifelines for people with disabilities.”

Stephen Bennett is the former President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy, and Mark Perriello is the President and CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities.

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation’s largest cross-disability organization. We promote equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. Our members, including people with disabilities and our family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change.  Visit www.AAPD.com for more information.

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UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES INTRODUCE AMERICA’S SUPERCOMMITTEE

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

UCP Contacts:
Lauren Cozzi, 202-973-7114, lcozzi@ucp.org
Alicia Kubert Smith, 202-973 7168, akubertsmith@ucp.org

AAPD Contacts:
Lara Schwartz, 202-521-4309, lschwartz@aapd.com
Frankie Mastrangelo, 202-521-4308, fmastrangelo@aapd.com

United Cerebral Palsy and American Association of People with Disabilities Introduce America’s Supercommittee

Engaged Citizens Work to Preserve Medicaid by Sharing Stories,Encouraging Participation

Washington, D.C. – (September 21, 2011) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) and The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) introduce America’s Supercommittee, a group of six engaged citizens who are lending their voices to the fight to preserve Medicaid. Over the next two months, the United States Congress Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction (the “Supercommittee”), composed of six senators and six members of the U.S. House of Representatives, will deliberate and craft proposals concerning the federal budget. They are likely to recommend trillions of dollars of spending cuts, and could recommend major cuts to Medicaid. UCP, AAPD and the disability community, including our families, friends, and supporters, are engaged in a campaign to preserve Medicaid, which provides millions of Americans with disabilities the tools to remain healthy and participate in our communities.

America’s Supercommittee members will share their perspectives on the importance of Medicaid and personal stories, in an effortto educate the public, the media, and Congress about preserving Medicaid.   The public is encouraged to send questions and also share personalperspectives and stories at the America’s Supercommittee website, http://ucp.org/public-policy/america-s-super-committee. The site contains information about how to contact members of Congress, and information about the congressional Super committee’s meetings and deliberations.

The members of America’s Supercommittee are:

  • Robert Coward, Washington, DC: An Air Force veteran and DC native, Robert Coward has advised federal and local officials on accessibility and health care. “Medicaid offers people with disabilities real freedom and choices. The quality health care Medicaid provides allows us to live in our communities and lead independent lives.”
  • Richard Donovan, New York, New York: Rich Donovan is Managing Partner and principal owner of IPS, a strategic consultancy that works with business and government to create value in the disability marketplace. Donovan also acts as Chief Investment Officer of WingSail Capital, a new investment management firm that uses a disability lens to find outperformance in global markets. “The world of disability has changed since 1950, and legacy programs like Medicaid must adapt to those changes. Society has an opportunity to use this moment of focus on fiscal sustainability to reshape programs that aren’t delivering on promises to position people with disabilities to deliver the value inherent within them.
  • ”David Feinman, Washington, DC: David Feinman is Senior Legislative Associate for The Jewish Federations of North America. He is a member of the Interfaith Disability Advocacy Coalition Steering Committee. “Considering the challenges the “Super Committee” and the rest of the Congress face coming to a consensus on most issues, it is critical that they hear from people who want to have a constructive conversation.”
  • Jessica Norwood, Stow, Ohio:  Jessica Norwood is working toward her bachelor’s degree in Political Science at Kent State University. She also works as an office aide at two child development centers. Medicaid provides Jessica with a personal aide who assists her with driving, college work, and tasks at home. She participates in a program that connects parents of people with disabilities and adults who have disabilities. “I want you to understand that including people with disabilities in our communities benefits everyone.  Medicaid helps so many people to live fully in our communities and contribute,” said Norwood.
  • German Parodi, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania:  “Without Medicaid, I wouldn’t be able to go to college, work, and be a contributing member of my community. This is about our basic civil rights—the right to be free and to live full lives.”
  • Amelia Wallrich, Chicago, Illinois:  Amelia Wallrich attends Northwestern University Law School.Previously, she attended the University of Illinois and completed an internship with Senator Richard Durbin. Wallrich explains, “Our country’s financial stability doesn’t have to be at odds with genuine reform and making people’s lives better.”

“Americans with disabilities and their families are relying on Supercommittee legislators to preserve Medicaid’s vital lifeline which allows eight million people to participate in community life, remain healthy and live to their potential–American values of opportunity, fairness and dignity,” said Stephen Bennett, former United Cerebral Palsy President & Chief Executive Officer. “The Supercommittee will compromise American values if it cuts Medicaid’s critical health and long-term care initiatives, upon which those now eligible rely, thus forcing people to leave their homes and live in institutions—at greater expense to taxpayers.”

“We have to let our elected leaders know that we are watching and they are accountable to us,” said AAPD President and CEO Mark Perriello. “The real Americans on America’s Supercommittee are sending a clear message:  our leaders must not erode the opportunities that Medicaid provides millions of Americans with disabilities. Members of Congress are going to hear from thousands more people just like them, and they need to listen,” he added.

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.
 
About The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
“The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation’s largest cross-disability organization. We promote equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. Our members, including people with disabilities and our family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change.” Visit www.AAPD.com for more information.

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AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILY MEMBERS MET WITH WHITE HOUSE OFFICIALS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

UCP Contacts:
Lauren Cozzi, 202-973-7114, LCozzi@ucp.org or
Alicia Kubert Smith, 202-973 7168, akubertsmith@ucp.org

AAPD Contact:
Rebecca Panoff, 202-521-4307, rpanoff@aapd.com

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILY MEMBERS MET WITH WHITE HOUSE OFFICIALS

Medicaid should not be gutted in debt ceiling negotiations

Washington, D.C. – July 12, 2011 – Today, a group of Americans who benefit from Medicaid services for people with disabilities—joined by representatives of and United Cerebral Palsy and the American Association of People with Disabilities—met with officials in the White House. They shared their personal experiences with Medicaid, putting a human face on this critical resource for millions of Americans with disabilities and their families.

“People with disabilities join all Americans in recognizing the need to tackle our national debt.  There are alternative ways to reform Medicaid without gutting the vital supports that create real opportunities for people with disabilities,” said Stephen Bennett, former President & Chief Executive Officer of United Cerebral Palsy. “You wouldn’t try to make a car more fuel-efficient by reducing the amount of gasoline in the tank. Slashing Medicaid eliminates the ability for people with disabilities to go to work, stay with their families and contribute to the economic recovery.”

Bennett continues, “Medicaid can receive a sensible tune-up that also achieves precisely what both parties want: a stronger economy and a reduced deficit while strengthening the hand of Americans with disabilities to be contributing members of society. To drastically reduce this vital support is short-sighted and wrong. We welcome the chance to be a part of the solution.”

“Today’s meeting shows what is really at stake in negotiations about Medicaid—access to opportunity for millions of people across our country. President Obama has the potential to be a hero for millions of Americans with disabilities in this country. The president has often spoken about the need to look at the way policies affect real people.  Today, Anna Liebenow and the Hetrick and Guzman families showed White House officials the real-world implications of proposed cuts to Medicaid. They are among the many Americans for whom Medicaid is a lifeline to opportunity, work, and a better life.  Slashing Medicaid would amount to rolling back the clock on opportunity for people with disabilities and their families.  America is better than that,” said AAPD’s President & CEO Mark Perriello. “I believe President Obama is emboldened to continue to support Medicaid and stand up for everyday Americans in these negotiations.

Participants included:

  • Anna Liebenow of Providence,Rhode Island. Anna uses a wheelchair due to MS.  Through Medicaid, Anna receives personal assistance that enables her to volunteer in her community and work. She also serves on the board of the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority.
  • Sue, Micah, and Nicholas Hetrick of Columbus, Ohio.  Micah, 22, has Down syndrome.  Medicaid provides assistance during the day while Sue is at work, supporting their family. Micah volunteers in their community and recently received his high school diploma.  Nickolas, 27, recently completed his PhD and will teach English in Columbus in the fall.
  • Linda and Javi Guzman of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Javi, 17, has autism and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), a connective tissue disease. Through Medicaid, he has an aide during the day while Linda is at work. He also receives life skills training, transportation to community activities, and medical care.

 

The families met with the following White House officials: Jason Furman, Assistant to the President for Economic Policy and the Principal Deputy Director of the National Economic Council; Keith Fontenot, Associate Director for Health Programs, Office of Management and Budget; John Carson, Director of the Office of Public Engagement; and Kareem Dale, Associate Director, White House Office of Public Engagement & Special Assistant to the President for Disability Policy.

During the meeting, participants described the benefits of Medicaid. “Without Medicaid, people’s lives are so limited,” said Anna Liebenow. “At the White House, we told the staff what cutting Medicaid would do to us and to the many people who did not have a chance to share their stories today.”

Linda Guzman explained how real families like hers can contribute to the national discussion about Medicaid: “There are so many people who can relate to the struggle.  It’s important that people see me as a parent who loves her child more than anything,” she said. “If I didn’t have these services, I couldn’t go to work.  Then what would my family do?” she added.  Speaking about his trip to Washington to tell his story, Javi Guzman explained:  “I’m going to show the world what people with autism can do.”

Sue Hetrickspoke positively about the meetings:  “They were very open to hearing our stories,” she said. “For generations, my family has been hard workers, and so have I.  When I went to the White House and said this program is what keeps me working and gives Micah the opportunity to do the same, I showed them the real-world consequences of these decisions,” she added.

For more information on these families, visit www.ucp.org/public-policy/faces-of-medicaid and www.aapd.com/Medicaidfamilies.

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

 About The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), the country’s largest cross-disability membership association, organizes the disability community to be a powerful force for change – politically, economically, and socially.  AAPD was founded in 1995 to help unite the diverse community of people with disabilities, including their family, friends and supporters, and to be a national force for change in implementing the goals of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). To learn more, visit the AAPD website:
www.AAPD.com.

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UCP, AAPD call on nation’s leaders to preserve Medicaid in debt ceiling negotiations

Media Advisory                   

UCP Contacts:
Lauren Cozzi, 202-973-7114
LCozzi@ucp.org or
Alicia Kubert Smith, 202-973 7168, akubertsmith@ucp.org

AAPD Contact:
Valerie Holford, 301-926-1298, 
valerieholford@starpower.net 

 

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILY MEMBERS TO MEET WITH WHITE HOUSE OFFICIALS AND HILL OFFICES

MEDICAID SHOULD BE PROTECTED IN DEBT CEILING NEGOTIATIONS

Washington, D.C.  (July 12, 2011) – On Tuesday, July 12, Americans with disabilities and their family members will meet White House officials and members of Congress to discuss the way that Medicaid has strengthened their families and provided them with opportunities that would otherwise be out of reach. These everyday Americans will meet with the most powerful people in government to share their stories and provide a human face to the debt ceiling negotiations. The Administration has signaled their strong support for Medicaid and other programs critical to people with disabilities. It is vital that this support continues and that members of Congress work with the Administration to prevent devastating cuts.

Medicaid is a lifeline for 8 million children and adults with disabilities, among others including millions of seniors and families.

“Tackling our nation’s budget woes cannot be combined with an attack on people with disabilities, their families, and caregivers,” said Stephen Bennett, former President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “Medicaid is a fundamental lynchpin for people with disabilities to live and work independently in communities across our nation.  To eliminate this vital support is short-sighted and wrong.”

“It is critical that President Obama continue his support for Medicaid and that members of Congress stand up for the most vulnerable people in America. Leaders in Washington must not balance the budget on the backs of people with disabilities, children, the elderly, and the poor,” said Mark Perriello, President and CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD).

People meeting with White House officials and Capitol Hill offices include:

Linda and Javi Guzman (Chapel Hill, North Carolina)

Linda is a single mom whose 17-year old son, Javi, has both autism and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.  Medicaid provides him health care, daytime assistance, and training in life skills that will help him achieve an independent life. Linda explained, “Without the services from Medicaid, I would have to quit my job and go on public assistance, or even worse I would have to possibly place Javi in an institution that costs a lot more than Medicaid services.”

Anna Liebenow (Providence, Rhode Island)

Anna has multiple sclerosis and uses a wheelchair. She lives alone and is unable to get in and out of bed without assistance. Because of Medicaid, she has an aide who helps her with getting out of bed and other basic activities. Because Medicaid provides this service, Anna is able to work and volunteer in her community.

Sue and Micah Hetrick (Columbus, Ohio)

Sue’s son Micah has Down Syndrome. Through Medicaid he gets assistance from an aide during the day,enabling his mother to work. Without this aide, his mother would likely need to be on public assistance herself. 

In addition to providing aides to assist people with disabilities, Medicaid also provides access to wheelchairs and prosthetic devices for people with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.  Medicaid pays for prescription drugs for persons with mental illnesses, epilepsy and other medical conditions.  Medicaid enables people with intellectual disabilities to live and work in the community by providing skill-building and support programs, and through Early and Periodic Screening Diagnosis & Treatment programs Medicaid helps identify children’s disabilities early and gets them the care they need.

 

About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.

 

About The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), the country’s largest cross-disability membership association, organizes the disability community to be a powerful force for change – politically, economically, and socially.  AAPD was founded in 1995 to help unite the diverse community of people with disabilities, including their family, friends and supporters, and to be a national force for change in implementing the goals of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). To learn more, visit the AAPD website: www.AAPD.com.

 

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