Supreme Court Decision a Big Win for People with Disabilities

UCP Applauds Decision to Uphold Pillar of Affordable Care Act

UCP applauds the decision made by the U.S. Supreme Court this morning upholding a key pillar of the Affordable Care Act: the availability of subsidies to participants in federally-established health care exchanges as intended by Congress.

The Supreme Court’s opinion in King v. Burwell, decides the question of whether the Affordable Care Act precludes the IRS from extending subsidies to participants in states that have not set up their own health insurance exchanges. The Fourth Circuit had previously held that the text of the ACA — stating that subsidies were available to exchanges “established by the State” — should be interpreted to make subsidies available to participants in federally established exchanges as well. The Court affirmed the Fourth Circuit, maintaining the status quo.

People with disabilities are especially impacted by the decision. Prior to the ACA, many people with disabilities were denied coverage due to a pre-existing condition or were priced out of the insurance market. A large number of people with disabilities are not in the labor force and lack access to employer sponsored insurance. And in many states with large populations of people with disabilities, the states refused to set up exchanges leading to the establishment of the federal exchange. The ability to take advantage of credits and subsidies offered through the federal exchange is critical to ensuring that the exchanges can continue to provide affordable health insurance.

“The Court’s opinion is a big win for people with disabilities and their families and caregivers,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “For those who need to purchase health care coverage through the federal exchange – including many caregivers who have given up employer sponsored benefits in order to care for their loved ones with disabilities, affordable health care is a must. No family should go broke because they or their loved one has a medical need.”

In the 6-3 opinion by Chief Justice Roberts, Justice Scalia dissented, joined by Justices Thomas and Alito.