Changing Spaces Aims to Bring Access and Dignity to a Universal Experience

Nobody should have to lay on the floor of a public restroom. While this may seem obvious for some, individuals with disabilities and their families are not always afforded another option. This is because they are frequently faced with bathrooms being unsanitary, cramped, and often inaccessible.

Society has acknowledged the urgency for coat and purse hangers in bathroom stalls to maintain the hygienic safety and convenience for the individual using the restroom, however, often it seems that the same thought has not been considered for some individuals with disabilities. Many times, their caregivers have to change individuals on bathroom floors because there is no other option: the only changing table in most bathrooms is meant for babies. This is not only unhygienic, but also undignified.

Even if toilets are deemed accessible, many times they do not have necessary items for many individuals such as a lift, changing table, or an accessible and supportive toilet. This may fully prevent some caregivers from being able to provide adequate toileting care. Common and important activities such as visiting family or traveling outside the home may become a truly daunting logistical challenge.

Individuals with disabilities and their caregivers are working at the state level in Georgia (Changing Spaces GA), and in other places across the world, to improve public restrooms so that they are accessible and dignified for all methods of toileting. Advocates have two very clear solutions: rather than only having baby-sized changing tables, adult-sized changing tables would be suitable for all age groups. Furthermore, a ceiling hoist would actually reduce the risk of injury when lifting people onto a table, and it does not take up any extra space in the stall (you can view the video from Changing Spaces GA here).

In a society where individuals with disabilities still experience many barriers, being able to change in a toilet stall with dignity should not be another problem that individuals have to face. Changing Spaces is more than a campaign for hygiene, it is about dignity for the individual and those who love them. It is also about providing individuals with disabilities and their caregivers access to a space that has just as much access as for anyone else, allowing them to live life more freely and without barriers; and most importantly, letting them be who they want to be.

To learn more, visit Changing Spaces GA or follow along with the discussion on social media using the hashtag #OFFTHEFLOOR.