Facts About Employment

This post and the accompanying infographic are by UCP’s Summer 2017 and Programs and Development Intern, Sara Shemali

 

The worst global recession in recent history, the great recession, yielded unemployment rates which peaked in 2009 at 10 percent. Lowering this exceptionally high rate of unemployment became a national priority in America. Yet, the current rate of unemployment for people with disabilities still stands at 10.5 percent, over double the rate of current unemployment for people without disabilities and still greater than that peak rate of 10%. The difficulty that people with disabilities experience when finding and applying for jobs has rippling effects, making it harder for them to achieve financial autonomy and gain independence, as well as a myriad of other benefits of employment.

Barriers and Benefits

Individuals with disabilities face significant barriers to employment that persist regardless of education, race, age,or gender. According to data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2016, at all levels of education, people with disabilities are less likely to be employed than their able-bodied counterparts. This data reflects the obstacles many people with disabilities face when looking for and obtaining work. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, in a 2013 news release, reported that 70.8 percent of people with disabilities between the ages of 16 and 64 had experienced at least one barrier to employment in the past. These barriers include a person’s own disability, lack of education or training, insufficient transportation, and the need for accommodations on the job.

When individuals with disabilities are given the resources to overcome these barriers, they are valuable assets to the companies that hire them. Supportive employment for people with disabilities, such as the partnership between UCP of the North Bay and WineBev, has long proved to be effective. WineBev implemented a successful training program which provides not only accessible but also competitive employment for people with disabilities. Another company found that the young people with disabilities that they hired had an attrition rate of only one percent, compared to 10 to 15 percent for people without disabilities. Their workers with disabilities were also more productive than their workers without. Furthermore, a recent study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders demonstrates a link between having a developmental disability and being able to come up with unique and creative solutions to problems.This trait makes people with developmental disabilities excellent candidates for jobs which require divergent and out of the box thinking.

The Business Case

Employment of people with disabilities is not just a worker issue. It is also imperative to analyze the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities from a business point of view. One concern employers may have about hiring a candidate with a disclosed disability is the cost of accommodations. However, the Job Accommodation Network has found that most (59%) of accommodations cost nothing to employers to implement. One accommodation that employers are increasingly making is allowing employees with disabilities to work from home some or all of the time, an accommodation that more and more workplaces offer to employees with or without disabilities anyway. It is currently estimated that 463,000 people with disabilities, making up 7.1 percent of people with disabilities, regularly work from home.

When accommodations do incur some cost, 36 percent of employers reported a one-time cost, typically around five hundred dollars. Only five percent of employers reported that the cost of accommodations was ongoing or a mixture of one-time and ongoing costs. In addition to being low-cost, accommodations can have a number of positive consequences, including retaining valuable employees and increasing the employee’s productivity, reducing employee absenteeism, improving employee interactions, and increasing productivity for the company as a whole. Employers also have a variety of free resources at their disposal to help them meet the needs of their employees with disabilities, including the Employer Assistance and Resource Network (EARN) and consulting from the Job Accommodation Network (JAN).

Technology and the Future

Although the levels of unemployment for individuals with disabilities may seem staggering when compared to the unemployment rate of people without disabilities, there is promise for improvement in the future. As technology advances, new devices that further accessibility and that improve health and longevity will likely increase employment of people with disabilities. The BrailleNote Apex, one such new technology, features a word processor, calendar, media player, web browser, and GPS, among other things, all in braille and in one device which assists the visually impaired. Assistive technologies are not only becoming more sophisticated but also more commonplace and integrated into the workplace. For example, Microsoft has just announced its plans to integrate eye-tracking features into Windows 10, which will make the software more accessible, and make it easier for programmers to improve and innovate new eye-tracking applications and accessories. These advancements will make it easier for people with disabilities to access job opportunities and work without limits.

For more information regarding employment for people with disabilities check out UCP’s Facts about Employment infographic

For a detailed image description of the infographic, click here.

 

 

#KnowMedicaid

 

As Google search results indicate, many more Americans have grown concerned about losing their (or a family member’s) Medicaid benefit. We at UCP are receiving an increasing number of inquiries about Medicaid and the services and supports it provides for many individuals with disabilities and their families.

 

Even without a pending health care bill in Congress, it can be overwhelming to navigate the process of accessing the funding and benefits necessary to receive the support needed so you or your loved one can live a life without limits. While there is no one way to simplify the process, there are ways to make it a bit easier. The tips and tricks below will help you in your conversations with Medicaid and other agencies.

 

When you’re done checking out our tips, you will also find a PDF guide with the contact information for Medicaid (and related agencies in all 50 states) at the bottom of this post.

 

Keep Records of All Conversations, and Be Sure to Seek Clarification When Necessary:

 

Whenever calling your state or any other entity) regarding services and supports, be sure to keep notes about your conversation including: who you speak with , what department they are in, what department they refer you to, and any other pertinent details.

 

This is really important in the case that there is any confusion or conflicting information during the process , because you will be able to provide past information about what you were told and when.

 

It is also a great idea to ask the person you are speaking to to follow up with an email, if possible; that way you are able to see their summary of the conversation, and open up a dialogue that may help in the future should there be any misunderstandings.

 

Remember That State and Federal Agencies Are Not Identical:

 

When working with Medicaid, or any other government program or agency, it is important to be aware of the difference between the agency in your state, and the federal agencies in Washington, DC.

 

While agencies can be connected, the state agency handles state programs and issues and the federal agency counterpart handles national ones. When getting information about services and supports, it is vital to differentiate between what is available and provided by your state, and what might also be available on the national level.

 

This is also key because these differences affect how programs are funded, and may alter the process required to become eligible. Sometimes programs may be jointly run on the state and national level, but it is still important to be aware of when you’re talking to, or about, your individual state versus when you’re looking at things on a national level.

 

Not All States Run Programs the Same Way, (or a Call Agencies by the Same Name):

 

Another reason it is important to be aware of the difference between state and federal programming is because the way programs, such as Medicaid, are administered can vary significantly from state to state.

 

Therefore, be sure to investigate how things are run in your specific state, and not go off of the experiences of an individual who may live someplace else. A program that is provided through the Department of Health and Human Services in one state may be provided through the Department of Welfare in another.

 

Before getting discouraged and thinking something doesn’t exist, always remember to try a different name or department, because you never know what it might fall under in your state.

 

Always Ask for Other Options:

 

Just because one program, grant, or service is not an option for you, doesn’t mean there isn’t something out there that can help with your situation. Even if you find out that the program you are looking into will not work (or be available) based on for your situation,, be sure to ask the person you’re speaking with if they know of any other programs that may be able to help.

 

When considering your options, it is also important to remember that different programs have different eligibility requirements. So, be sure to provide as much information as possible to determine if you are eligible for a specific program.

 

Obtaining services through Medicaid (or other agencies) is rarely a simple process, but we hope that these tips– as well as our guide of various state offices involved in the administration of services and supports for individuals with disabilities– will make your journey a bit easier.
Do you have any other tips or tricks you would like to add to the list? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter using the hashtag #KnowMedicaid. To learn more about Medicaid in your state, check out our resource guide.

What You Need to Know About College as a Student with a Disability

The transition from high school to college can be both a scary and exciting time for every student. College is a whole new world, and unlike anything most students have yet experienced.

 

Before heading off to college, students have questions and concerns about their future. Most students probably wonder about their major, whether they will like the school they have chosen, and what their new friends will be like, but for students with disabilities, the questions can often be a little more complicated.

 

Students with disabilities may wonder about accommodations, accessibility, services and supports, and getting help with everyday needs. And these questions may not be easy to answer.

 

As someone who’s a former college student, and an individual with a disability, I wanted to share some of the things that I wish I had known freshman year in hopes that it may make your transition a little bit easier.

 

Self Advocacy Is Key:

Growing up, it was typically the responsibility of your parents, teachers, or other administrators to make sure you got the accommodations and supports you needed to be successful in school. But, in college, it becomes primarily your responsibility.

 

Self-advocacy is always important but becomes especially essential when navigating college. College is often the first time students have lived away from home, and it is important to remember that you are your own best advocate: there are lots of supports in place to help you be successful, but you have to be proactive and reach out so that the people around you know what you may, or may not need.

 

Most schools have Offices or Departments of Disability Services in place to help students with disabilities get the accommodations they need, such as note-taking support, extra time on exams, or any other reasonable academic accommodation, but nobody from the office is going to seek you out, especially if they don’t even know you’re there.

 

Make a point to become familiar with the services and supports that exist on your campus. Talk to the disability support staff to work on a plan for your accommodations to help ensure success from day one. You are in college now and, like your peers without disabilities, there are still people there to help you, but for the most part, you are in the driver’s seat now!

 

The Laws Are Different:

K-12 education for students with disabilities is mandated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), this means that students with disabilities are entitled to public education and that it is the responsibility of the school to see that all students are getting an appropriate education. Colleges don’t fall under IDEA, and therefore, are not required to make accommodations to the same degree as the public school system.

 

In college, students with disabilities are protected from discrimination, such as inaccessibility of buildings, under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Schools must provide reasonable accommodations such as notetakers or extra time on exams, but they don’t have any obligation to modify coursework to accommodate students with disabilities or provide additional supports such as assistance with personal care or activities of daily living to ensure a student is successful.

So, if you are, for example, a wheelchair user who needs help to get in and out of bed or perform other daily activities, the ADA requires your school to provide you with an accessible dorm room, but there is no legal obligation to provide you with an assistant or other types of personal care support.

 

This is important to know because it means that you will need to set up the supports you need on your own before you head off to school. Some schools have programs to help students with personal care needs, but this is not a requirement for all schools. Look into what your school offers to figure out what kind of supports may be available.

 

For more information about the difference in laws governing K-12 education and college check out the resources below:

 

https://umaine.edu/disability/accommodations-high-school-vs-college/

 

https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transitionguide.html

 

https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

 

 

It’s Okay to Reach out for Help and Support:

If you’re feeling overwhelmed, or struggling more than you thought you would, there is absolutely no shame in asking for help. Mental and emotional well-being is just as important as physical health, and academic support.

 

Most colleges have a variety of services to support students from health centers, to counseling and other mental health services, and wellness programs, in addition to academic supports. Take advantage of the support and community that exists around you, and don’t be afraid to reach out.

 

Additionally, there are lots of groups and activities on college campuses, and many colleges even have organizations run by and for students with disabilities. These organizations may or may not be support oriented. Many of them may just be social groups, or groups focused on advocacy and activism.

 

Whether or not they are disability focused, student organizations and extracurricular activities can be another great place to find support in college.

 

 

Transition Is Not One-Size-Fits-All:

Everybody is unique, which means that everyone’s experience in transitioning from high school to what comes after will look, feel, and be, very different. Whether you’re planning to go to school far away, attend college close to home, or do something else after high school, it’s important to remember there is no right way to transition from high school to beyond.

 

Whatever you decide to do after high school graduation, focus on making sure that it’s the right option for you, rather than worrying about whether it’s what other people expect.

 

For more information you need to know,  check out the topics below:

What You Need to Know About Preventative Care and Disability
What You Need to Know About Sexual and Reproductive Health and Disability

Transition Is…

 

Sometimes, unexpected or scary but also real and exciting

 

There are specialty clinics and hospitals throughout the country to address the unique needs of children with disabilities like cerebral palsy, but the same is not true for adults. Once people with disabilities reach the age of 18 or 21 they often have to stop seeing their pediatric providers, only to find there is no adult provider to take their place.

 

This is a major issue that affects young adults and adults with disabilities throughout the country, and contributes to a range of health inequalities and other issues. As we have addressed before, transitioning from pediatric care to adult care can be particularly difficult if your new doctor has little to no familiarity with disability.

 

Adults with disabilities need access to the same care as other adults, but they also need providers who are familiar with the unique needs that may come along with disability, and that is when young adults with disabilities can feel as though they’ve entered a void. However, one UCP affiliate is working to bridge that gap in a particularly creative and comprehensive way.

 

UCP of Minnesota/Gillette Specialty Children’s Hospital is the home of Gillette Lifetime, a clinic for patients with lifelong disabilities such as cerebral palsy and spina bifida who are ages 16 or older.

 

Kathy Lindstrom, an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, at the Lifetime Clinic, says it grew out of an unmet need in the community.  Lifetime Clinic’s Transition Program started as, “a grassroots movement put together based on patient needs. “

 

Kathy Lindstrom Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, at the Lifetime Clinic

Kathy Lindstrom Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, at the Lifetime Clinic

 

 

Easier, with the right resources and support

 

The services at Gillette Lifetime Transition Clinic merge medical needs with the unique psychological and social needs of transition-aged young adults with disabilities. As Lindstrom explains “everything seems to change when patients reach the late teenage years; it’s not just medical, but in all aspects of their lives.”

 

Lindstrom says, “Legal decision making becomes an issue, [so does vocational] planning, post high school planning and discussions about future living arrangements.  Parents are bogged down with meeting the challenges of daily life, and sometimes it can be hard to develop a vision for the future… and so transition sneaks up on families.”

 

Parental involvement in the process often shifts at this stage, so it’s also important to prepare both parents and young adults for this change.

 

Transition is not a simple process that happens overnight, or automatically, on a patient’s 18th birthday. Lindstrom understands that it can be hard for patients to come to the clinic for the first time, as many of them have had the same providers for their entire lives, and it can be hard to let go.

 

Lifetime makes this transition a little bit easier by allowing patients to transfer some care to adult providers, while continuing to collaborate with other specialty providers for other aspects for a period.

 

During their first visit to the clinic, patients meet with Lindstrom and her colleagues to discuss transition, and outline the issues that are most important to them. These appointments are conversations, not exams, and take place in a conference room, as opposed to an exam room. The appointment gives patients, and their families, an opportunity to discuss any questions or concerns they may have, and to get a feel for the services available at Lifetime.

 

 

About choices, and coordination

 

Lifetime is focused on specialty medical needs, and is not a primary care facility. Lindstrom offers the following advice to any individuals with disabilities looking for primary care providers:

 

  • Meet with the family Primary Care Provider (PCP) and talk about the potential of becoming a patient. If the doctor already sees the rest of the family, they might be a good start for patients with disabilities as well. She encourages patients to integrate into their family’s practice whenever feasible.

 

  • Arrange an advanced meeting with the PCP and see how accessible the facility is before becoming a patient in the practice.

 

  • If at first you don’t succeed, try try again. Lindstrom cautions that you may not click with the first provider you meet with, but that doesn’t mean you won’t find somebody who works for you.

 

  • Your insurance will affect your options for a PCP, so remember to check first to make sure your preferred provider is covered!

 

Lindstrom also encourages primary care providers to connect with a patient’s specialty care providers. Gillette operates a telehealth triage line for all patients and their providers, regardless of age. If a primary care provider is unsure of how to treat a patient, they can reach out and communicate with other members of the patient’s care team.

 

In addition to medical care, Gillette Lifetime supports patients with the social aspects of transition such as recreation, community integration and helps prepare them for changing relationships with their family and friends, even giving them space to talk about the potential of romantic relationships.

 

Transition is difficult for every young adult, but when you have a disability, you may not know where to go, and you may have a unique set of questions that you feel like no one can answer, which is why transition clinics like Gillette Lifetime’s Transition Clinic are so important.

 

Learning more

 

There are several clinics that specialize in current medical recommendations for young adults with cerebral palsy throughout the country.

 

If you are located outside of Minnesota or the Midwest, and would like to see if there is a transition clinic near you, please be sure to check out our latest guide on healthcare for adults with cerebral palsy and related disabilities for clinics and additional resources that may be helpful in the transition from pediatric to adult health care.

 

Patient with a practitioner at the Lifetime Clinic

UCP and the National Council on Disability – “First Responders and Disability”

On December 9, 2016, UCP and the National Council on Disability joined together to host a day of conversation surrounding first responders and the disability community. Bringing together diverse perspectives from across the country, the day was a raw and honest look at the way law enforcement and other members of the first responder community interact with those living with disabilities.

Watch the footage (captioned) below:

 

View the Program Agenda

View the Event Summary here

 

The RISE Act of 2016

RISE Act – The Respond, Innovate, Support, and Empower Act of 2016 (Bill S.2203)

Students living with a broad range of disabilities are enrolling at 4-year institutions more than ever before, but not all are completing their education. According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, students with learning disabilities (LD) enrolled at 4-year colleges or universities are completing their degrees at a rate of only 45%. For their non-disabled peers, the rate of completion for a 4-year degree currently stands at 53%. There are multiple factors that could be contributing to this rate. A new bill, The Respond, Innovate, Support, and Empower Act – or RISE Act, was introduced in the Senate on December 7, 2016 by Senators Bob Casey (D-PA), Orrin Hatch (R-UT), and Bill Cassidy (R-LA). This bill seeks to remove some of the most common barriers faced by students, and their families s, by requiring 4-year colleges and universities to adopt more transparent policies for their disability services – making it easier for students to obtain accommodations, services, and the supports they need throughout their college experience.

The RISE Act would amend the Higher Education Act (HEA) to clarify the types of documentation institutions of higher education must accept from students who are enrolling who have a disability. This would allow students to submit the same form(s)of documentation for proof of disability as they have done throughout their K-12 education. As stated in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, sufficient documentation for showing a student’s disability includes:

  • Previous documentation of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), including plans that may be both current and out-of-date;
  • Documentation of a 504 Education Plan;
  • Private school documentation of services;
  • A plan or record of disability from another institution of higher learning

In addition, the RISE Act would authorize $10 million in funds from the National Center for Information and Technical Support for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (an already existing program under the HEOA). The funds would go towards helping to better equip professors, teachers, and other facility and staff at colleges and universities to meet the growing needs of students with disabilities, including providing training, strategies, and help with providing accommodations. The RISE Act would also require all institutions of higher learning to adopt transparent policies regarding their disability services, and require them to widely share and disseminate that information to parents and families.

Join UCP in Helping to Spread Awareness for World CP Day on October 7!

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is one of the most complex and often misunderstood neurological disabilities across the world. CP affects each individual differently, with symptoms ranging in severity, from weakness in the limbs to complete lack of motor function. CP can come in many forms: Spastic (the most common), Ataxic, Syskinetic, or even a combination of types. Common signs of CP can include: a “floppy” appearance (specifically in the limbs), a delay in reaching milestones (like crawling or walking), or other delays.WCPD_CP_Diagnosis_Treatment_USA 

WCPD_2015_What_Is_CP_WORLD

Cultural beliefs are different around the world and for some, having a disability carries a cultural and social stigma. This can often lead to isolation of the individual with CP or shame on the mother.The stigma can have many ripple effects for the family of the person with CP or any other disability. One of the goals of World CP Day is to help make the public aware of CP and to help to end the misconceptions that surround it.

CP is a lifelong disability and there is no cure. Treatment for cerebral palsy can come in a range of different methods. If there are no steps taken to treat it, CP may cause the joints to worsen over time. Treatments can include both physical and occupational therapies.

UCP is proud to be apart of World CP Day on October 7 and the movement to help better understand Cerebral Palsy and the 17 million people worldwide who have it.

Sequestration and its Effects on Special Populations

Overview

On March 1, 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB will sequester approximately $85 billion in Fiscal Year 2013 spending as mandated by the Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011.

OMB recently calculated that sequestration will require an annual reduction of roughly 5 percent for nondefense programs and roughly 8 percent for defense programs. However, given that these cuts must be achieved over only seven months instead of 12, the effective percentage reductions will be approximately 9 percent for nondefense programs and 13 percent for defense programs. These large and arbitrary cuts will have severe impacts across the government.

This overview on sequestration and its effects on special populations includes information related to: Medicaid, Social Security, and CHIP programs; Medicare; the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); Education and Special education (IDEA); the Head Start Program; and Housing.

National Implications

Medicaid, Social Security, and CHIP: While Medicaid, Social Security, and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) are exempt from the talks, most other health programs will be affected.

While Social Security payments are not affected, sequestration would force the Social Security Administration (SSA) to furlough most of their workforce, causing SSA offices to close earlier or permanently. Beneficiaries who visit these offices or call the 1-800 number will most likely have to wait longer for services. The furlough would also impact the ability of disability claims, retirement claims, and disability hearings to be processed.

Medicare: The sequester includes a two percent cut to Medicare, as well as much larger cuts to federal healthcare agencies. The Medicare cut is big — $11 billion just this year, according to the White House budget office. These cuts will affect those who receive Medicare, including Dual Eligible’s (those who receive both Medicare and Medicaid).

This would also result in billions of dollars in lost revenues to Medicare doctors, hospitals, and other providers, who will only be reimbursed at 98 cents on the dollar for their services to Medicare beneficiaries.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): Sequestration would reduce access to behavioral healthcare. If sequestration takes effect, up to 373,000 seriously mentally ill adults and seriously emotionally disturbed children could go untreated. This would likely lead to increased hospitalizations, involvement in the criminal justice system, and homelessness for these individuals.

In addition, close to 8,900 homeless persons with serious mental illness would not get outreach, treatment, housing, and support they need through the Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program. Admissions to inpatient facilities for people in need of critical addiction services could be reduced by 109,000, and almost 91,000 fewer people could receive substance abuse treatment services.

Education and Special education (IDEA):

Title I: Title I education funds would be eliminated for more than 2,700 schools, cutting support for nearly 1.2 million disadvantaged students. This funding reduction would put the jobs of approximately 10,000 teachers and aides at risk. Students would lose access to individual instruction, afterschool programs, and other interventions that help close achievement gaps.

Special Education (IDEA): Cuts to special education funding would eliminate Federal support for more than 7,200 teachers, aides, and other staff who provide essential instruction and support to preschool and school-aged students with disabilities.

Head Start: Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 70,000 children, reducing access to critical early education. Community and faith based organizations, small businesses, local governments, and school systems would have to lay off over 14,000 teachers, teacher assistants, and other staff.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): Under sequestration, HUD would not renew about 125,000 Tenant Based Rental Assistance vouchers (Section 8). This would affect over 300,000 individuals across the country. Half of Section 8 households have children, 40 percent are disabled, and 20 percent are elderly.

Rebuilding in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

Colleagues and friends,

Over the last few days, we have seen the incredible devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy impacting millions of Americans along the Eastern seaboard. The thoughts and prayers of the entire UCP network are with those that have been impacted by this massive storm, particularly our northeast affiliates and the communities they serve. As we begin the process of recovery, know that we stand ready to help in any way we can.

Individuals with disabilities often are disproportionately impacted during times of disaster. A variety of barriers may already exist, such as lack of transportation and inaccessible buildings, and other barriers are either created or worsened by the disaster itself. Our UCP affiliates were well prepared for Hurricane Sandy—but the loss of power, flooding and infrastructure problems have made providing services and ensuring the safety of their clients that much more difficult. Their commitment and dedication to both their clients and staff is remarkable, and yet characteristic of how our affiliates rise to meet each occasion or adversity.

If you are in an affected area and are in need of assistance, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has information and support available. Click on the states listed below for local emergency response information.

As our UCP affiliates continue to provide assistance to those impacted in their communities, we encourage you to help support their work. Each of our affiliates in the states impacted by the storm is listed below, or use our local resources guide to determine which is in your area.

Hurricane Sandy is an unprecedented disaster and its impacts continue to be felt. It is during these times of crisis that communities must come together to rebuild. Thank you to everyone involved in the emergency response effort, our entire UCP network and all of those who are working to ensure that people with disabilities can live a life without limits.

Best regards,

Stephen Bennett

former UCP President & CEO

United Cerebral Palsy

 

How to help:

Click on the name of your state below to access local emergency information, or on the name of your local affiliate to support their work.

Connecticut:

UCP of Eastern Connecticut

UCP of Greater Hartford

UCP of Southern Connecticut

 

Delaware:

UCP of Delaware

 

District of Columbia:

UCP of Washington DC & Northern Virginia

 

Maine:

UCP of Maine

 

Maryland:

UCP of Central Maryland

UCP on the Potomac

 

Massachusetts:

UCP of Berkshire County

UCP of Metro Boston

 

New Jersey:

UCP of Hudson County

 

New York:

UCP of Nassau County

UCP of New York City

UCP of Suffolk

 

North Carolina:

Easter Seals UCP North Carolina & Virginia

 

Ohio:

UCP of Greater Cincinnati

UCP of Greater Cleveland

 

Pennsylvania:

Alleghenies UCP

UCP of Central Pennsylvania

UCP of Northeastern Pennsylvania

UCP of Philadelphia & Vicinity

UCP of South Central Pennsylvania

UCP/CLASS (formerly UCP of Pittsburgh)

 

Rhode Island:

UCP of Rhode Island

 

Virginia:

Easter Seals UCP North Carolina & Virginia