UCP and the National Council on Disability – “First Responders and Disability”

On December 9, 2016, UCP and the National Council on Disability joined together to host a day of conversation surrounding first responders and the disability community. Bringing together diverse perspectives from across the country, the day was a raw and honest look at the way law enforcement and other members of the first responder community interact with those living with disabilities.

Watch the footage (captioned) below:

 

View the Program Agenda

 

The RISE Act of 2016

RISE Act – The Respond, Innovate, Support, and Empower Act of 2016 (Bill S.2203)

Students living with a broad range of disabilities are enrolling at 4-year institutions more than ever before, but not all are completing their education. According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, students with learning disabilities (LD) enrolled at 4-year colleges or universities are completing their degrees at a rate of only 45%. For their non-disabled peers, the rate of completion for a 4-year degree currently stands at 53%. There are multiple factors that could be contributing to this rate. A new bill, The Respond, Innovate, Support, and Empower Act – or RISE Act, was introduced in the Senate on December 7, 2016 by Senators Bob Casey (D-PA), Orrin Hatch (R-UT), and Bill Cassidy (R-LA). This bill seeks to remove some of the most common barriers faced by students, and their families s, by requiring 4-year colleges and universities to adopt more transparent policies for their disability services – making it easier for students to obtain accommodations, services, and the supports they need throughout their college experience.

The RISE Act would amend the Higher Education Act (HEA) to clarify the types of documentation institutions of higher education must accept from students who are enrolling who have a disability. This would allow students to submit the same form(s)of documentation for proof of disability as they have done throughout their K-12 education. As stated in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, sufficient documentation for showing a student’s disability includes:

  • Previous documentation of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), including plans that may be both current and out-of-date;
  • Documentation of a 504 Education Plan;
  • Private school documentation of services;
  • A plan or record of disability from another institution of higher learning

In addition, the RISE Act would authorize $10 million in funds from the National Center for Information and Technical Support for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (an already existing program under the HEOA). The funds would go towards helping to better equip professors, teachers, and other facility and staff at colleges and universities to meet the growing needs of students with disabilities, including providing training, strategies, and help with providing accommodations. The RISE Act would also require all institutions of higher learning to adopt transparent policies regarding their disability services, and require them to widely share and disseminate that information to parents and families.

Join UCP in Helping to Spread Awareness for World CP Day on October 7!

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is one of the most complex and often misunderstood neurological disabilities across the world. CP affects each individual differently, with symptoms ranging in severity, from weakness in the limbs to complete lack of motor function. CP can come in many forms: Spastic (the most common), Ataxic, Syskinetic, or even a combination of types. Common signs of CP can include: a “floppy” appearance (specifically in the limbs), a delay in reaching milestones (like crawling or walking), or other delays.WCPD_CP_Diagnosis_Treatment_USA 

WCPD_2015_What_Is_CP_WORLD

Cultural beliefs are different around the world and for some, having a disability carries a cultural and social stigma. This can often lead to isolation of the individual with CP or shame on the mother.The stigma can have many ripple effects for the family of the person with CP or any other disability. One of the goals of World CP Day is to help make the public aware of CP and to help to end the misconceptions that surround it.

CP is a lifelong disability and there is no cure. Treatment for cerebral palsy can come in a range of different methods. If there are no steps taken to treat it, CP may cause the joints to worsen over time. Treatments can include both physical and occupational therapies.

UCP is proud to be apart of World CP Day on October 7 and the movement to help better understand Cerebral Palsy and the 17 million people worldwide who have it.

Sequestration and its Effects on Special Populations

Overview

On March 1, 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB will sequester approximately $85 billion in Fiscal Year 2013 spending as mandated by the Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011.

OMB recently calculated that sequestration will require an annual reduction of roughly 5 percent for nondefense programs and roughly 8 percent for defense programs. However, given that these cuts must be achieved over only seven months instead of 12, the effective percentage reductions will be approximately 9 percent for nondefense programs and 13 percent for defense programs. These large and arbitrary cuts will have severe impacts across the government.

This overview on sequestration and its effects on special populations includes information related to: Medicaid, Social Security, and CHIP programs; Medicare; the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); Education and Special education (IDEA); the Head Start Program; and Housing.

National Implications

Medicaid, Social Security, and CHIP: While Medicaid, Social Security, and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) are exempt from the talks, most other health programs will be affected.

While Social Security payments are not affected, sequestration would force the Social Security Administration (SSA) to furlough most of their workforce, causing SSA offices to close earlier or permanently. Beneficiaries who visit these offices or call the 1-800 number will most likely have to wait longer for services. The furlough would also impact the ability of disability claims, retirement claims, and disability hearings to be processed.

Medicare: The sequester includes a two percent cut to Medicare, as well as much larger cuts to federal healthcare agencies. The Medicare cut is big — $11 billion just this year, according to the White House budget office. These cuts will affect those who receive Medicare, including Dual Eligible’s (those who receive both Medicare and Medicaid).

This would also result in billions of dollars in lost revenues to Medicare doctors, hospitals, and other providers, who will only be reimbursed at 98 cents on the dollar for their services to Medicare beneficiaries.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): Sequestration would reduce access to behavioral healthcare. If sequestration takes effect, up to 373,000 seriously mentally ill adults and seriously emotionally disturbed children could go untreated. This would likely lead to increased hospitalizations, involvement in the criminal justice system, and homelessness for these individuals.

In addition, close to 8,900 homeless persons with serious mental illness would not get outreach, treatment, housing, and support they need through the Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program. Admissions to inpatient facilities for people in need of critical addiction services could be reduced by 109,000, and almost 91,000 fewer people could receive substance abuse treatment services.

Education and Special education (IDEA):

Title I: Title I education funds would be eliminated for more than 2,700 schools, cutting support for nearly 1.2 million disadvantaged students. This funding reduction would put the jobs of approximately 10,000 teachers and aides at risk. Students would lose access to individual instruction, afterschool programs, and other interventions that help close achievement gaps.

Special Education (IDEA): Cuts to special education funding would eliminate Federal support for more than 7,200 teachers, aides, and other staff who provide essential instruction and support to preschool and school-aged students with disabilities.

Head Start: Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 70,000 children, reducing access to critical early education. Community and faith based organizations, small businesses, local governments, and school systems would have to lay off over 14,000 teachers, teacher assistants, and other staff.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): Under sequestration, HUD would not renew about 125,000 Tenant Based Rental Assistance vouchers (Section 8). This would affect over 300,000 individuals across the country. Half of Section 8 households have children, 40 percent are disabled, and 20 percent are elderly.

Rebuilding in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

Colleagues and friends,

Over the last few days, we have seen the incredible devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy impacting millions of Americans along the Eastern seaboard. The thoughts and prayers of the entire UCP network are with those that have been impacted by this massive storm, particularly our northeast affiliates and the communities they serve. As we begin the process of recovery, know that we stand ready to help in any way we can. 

Individuals with disabilities often are disproportionately impacted during times of disaster. A variety of barriers may already exist, such as lack of transportation and inaccessible buildings, and other barriers are either created or worsened by the disaster itself. Our UCP affiliates were well prepared for Hurricane Sandy—but the loss of power, flooding and infrastructure problems have made providing services and ensuring the safety of their clients that much more difficult. Their commitment and dedication to both their clients and staff is remarkable, and yet characteristic of how our affiliates rise to meet each occasion or adversity.

If you are in an affected area and are in need of assistance, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has information and support available. Click on the states listed below for local emergency response information.

As our UCP affiliates continue to provide assistance to those impacted in their communities, we encourage you to help support their work. Each of our affiliates in the states impacted by the storm is listed below, or use our local resources guide to determine which is in your area.

Hurricane Sandy is an unprecedented disaster and its impacts continue to be felt. It is during these times of crisis that communities must come together to rebuild. Thank you to everyone involved in the emergency response effort, our entire UCP network and all of those who are working to ensure that people with disabilities can live a life without limits.

Best regards,

Stephen Bennett

UCP President & CEO

United Cerebral Palsy

 

How to help:

Click on the name of your state below to access local emergency information, or on the name of your local affiliate to support their work.

Connecticut:

     UCP of Eastern Connecticut

     UCP of Greater Hartford

     UCP of Southern Connecticut

 

Delaware:

     UCP of Delaware

 

District of Columbia:

     UCP of Washington DC & Northern Virginia

 

Maine:

     UCP of Maine

 

Maryland:

     UCP of Central Maryland

     UCP on the Potomac

 

Massachusetts:

     UCP of Berkshire County

     UCP of Metro Boston

 

New Jersey:

     UCP of Hudson County

 

New York:

     UCP of Nassau County

     UCP of New York City

     UCP of Suffolk

 

North Carolina:

     Easter Seals UCP North Carolina & Virginia

 

Ohio:

     UCP of Greater Cincinnati

     UCP of Greater Cleveland

 

Pennsylvania:

     Alleghenies UCP

     UCP of Central Pennsylvania

     UCP of Northeastern Pennsylvania

     UCP of Philadelphia & Vicinity

     UCP of South Central Pennsylvania

     UCP/CLASS (formerly UCP of Pittsburgh) 

 

Rhode Island:

     UCP of Rhode Island

 

Virginia:

     Easter Seals UCP North Carolina & Virginia