Congress Passes ABLE Act

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The U.S. Senate passed the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 by a vote of 76 to 16 late Tuesday evening, agreeing with the House of Representatives that the bill should become law. President Obama is expected to sign the bill soon.

The ABLE (Achieving a Better Life Experience) Act allows individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to save money tax free for their disability service needs, and allows these assets to be exclude for purposes of eligibility to receive needed government supports including Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). ABLE addresses barriers to independent living because individuals’ access to certain essential government funded programs can be lost once they establish a minimal level of income and savings.

Beginning in 2015, children or adults who acquire a disability before age 26 will be able to annually save up to the amount of the IRS gift tax exclusion, currently $14,000, and up to $100,000 total while remaining eligible for public programs such as Medicaid and SSI.  The ABLE Act will allow for similar certain individuals with disabilities and their families to maintain savings accounts similar to 529 saving plans for education.

Once the President signs the ABLE Act, the federal government will issue guidance on exactly how to set up and fund ABLE savings plans.

 

Enabled by Design-athon from an OT’s Perspective

Guest post contributed by Clarice Torrey, occupational therapist and winner of UCP Life Lab’s recent Design-athon People’s Choice Award. 

 

Clarice Torrey

I nerded out a bit when I first saw @UCPLifeLabs tweet about the Enabled-by Design-athon in DC. I had already become familiar with Enabled by Design and UCP Life Labs through the wonderful world of Twitter, but this event was exactly what I’d been looking for. I’m an occupational therapist who works primarily with children who have cerebral palsy, and I want to blend my knowledge of disability with my passion for designing and making. Over the past 10+ years as an occupational therapist, I have designed and fabricated many adaptive aids and splints. The Design-athon felt like it was made for me.

Even so, I didn’t exactly know what to expect. Thursday morning I walked into the event at Google’s DC headquarters and was assigned to a team consisting of Jessica Bonness, an interior designer, educator and our team facilitator; Jessica Denson, an interior design student; Emily Flax, an industrial designer; Patricia Torres, a universal design student; and Reem Bagais, an interior design student. We started with empathy exercises to gain a better understanding of what it’s like to have a disability. For instance, we put on gloves to search for items in our purse and used earplugs/headphones to simulate a hearing impairment. The exercise that resonated the most with us was doing activities with limited dexterity and only having the use of one upper extremity.

Our question became this: How can we facilitate increased independence for people with limited to no use of one upper extremity? There are so many daily activities most people take for granted that are made possible or easier with two hands. We wanted a tool that could be worn or at least easily accessible to provide the stabilization that so many two-handed tasks require. For instance when zipping up a jacket, you can complete the task with only one hand, but it will probably take you longer and you might have to use your teeth or another awkward adaptation.Empathy Exercise

As an occupational therapist, I do activity analysis so often it’s become second nature. One thing I frequently tell families is that the two hands don’t have to have equal skills in order to be functional. Almost all of us have a dominant hand that does most of the work, I usually call the other hand the “helper hand.” It’s the stabilizer. We used this information to brainstorm: How do we stabilize or grip objects? How do we attach things to our bodies?

The wall and sticky notes quickly became our friends.

As the word wearable was written on the wall, Emily saw it as “we are able” and we quickly decided that was our team name. We continued brainstorming.

Emily took the lead and we began adding to our lists and calling out some really random things. At one point, I became extremely interested in the idea of electromagnetics. I excused myself from the group for a bit to consult with some engineering/tech friends: Philip Lindsay and Darian Ahler. One of the original team ideas was a bracelet with an attachment to stabilize something. In the case of zipping up a jacket, you would reach over to one side of the jacket and activate an electromagnet to stabilize the jacket, as your unaffected hand managed the zipper and pulled it up. My friends talked me through solenoids and balloon/coffee grounds grippers. As I tried to do some research on the feasibility of something higher tech, the rest of the team continued working on other ideas.

It was a real shuffle to present to the crowd and update them on our progress. It was also a good way to keep us moving forward. It was fun to hear what the other seven teams at the event were working on. There was clearly some amazing minds coming together to come up with beautiful, functional designs to benefit all.

Our design continued to develop that first day. We had the opportunity to consult with Brett Heising of brettapproved.com. He has limited dexterity in his right hand. He told us the most difficult tasks for him were tying a tie and buttoning the top button and sleeves of a dress shirt. I simulated our design theory by using my hand to form a “clip” and stabilize the material of his shirt sleeve held together. He still wasn’t able to button the button.

I asked Brett if he had ever used a button hook, which is a common buttoning aid. He said he had, but challenged us to come up with a better design. We realized that our stabilizer had the potential to develop by adding different attachments based on the individual needs. I continued problem-solving a tool for this specific task, but it is still in development.We Are Able Prototypes

The stabilizing gripper we had designed would facilitate tying a tie though and we began to list all of the activities it would help with. It could help zip up jackets, open ziplock baggies, open other packages, hold a fork for cutting with a knife, hold paper while cutting with scissors, and hold a smartphone for the other hand to easily access.

As our first day came to an end, we felt that the palm of the hand would provide more stability than the wrist and that a low tech attachment would be more feasible. The next day we would bring various materials and clips to problem-solve what would work best. We consulted with representatives from PSC Engineering who were on hand with 3-D printers to print out a modified version of a slide clip pants hanger clip, which is the type of attachment piece we were leaning towards.

As I left the first day, I was exhausted and exhilarated. Now that we had a basic concept, I needed some hands-on inspiration. I needed to touch and feel materials and process. I walked up and down every aisle of a local Wal-Mart letting my brain work through the possibilities. I bought ribbon, chain and leather bracelets, yarn, a crochet hook, metal picnic tablecloth clips, and various other supplies we could possibly use tomorrow to put together a prototype. I knew it wouldn’t be as pretty as I would like, but I knew it might help us make a functioning tool.

Friday morning was crunch time. Patricia set to work on the computer animated design. Jessica worked on the slides for the presentation. With everyone’s “supply” contribution in the middle of the table some of us began playing with materials. We ended up using the tablecloth hooks and reformed them into a universal cuff. We covered the metal in leather and attached a slide-lock hanger clip. We covered the clip in Sugru for aesthetics and for greater stability at the latch.

Winning DesignWe were still making changes it was time to present to the judges, but we were proud of what we made in just a short time. This small tool had the ability to assist people with cerebral palsy, stroke, arthritis and other disabilities be more functional and independent. Our presentation went well, and I really felt that the judges and the people in the room appreciated and valued our hard work and what we had done in such a short time. We were awarded the People’s Choice Award and a Google Chromecast each! Brett talked to us about a friend in Arizona that could help with bringing our design to market.

For me, the Design-athon was an opportunity to collaborate with like-minded people passionate about design and disability. It allowed me to blend my knowledge, creativity, and passion. Designing and making adaptive aides has been one of my life pursuits, and with this experience, I feel confident that I am moving in the right direction.

 

Design-athon Revised Header

 

Thank You to a Congressional Champion

Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA)

Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA)

United Cerebral Palsy would like to sincerely thank retiring U.S. Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa for his 40 years of service in Congress. Throughout his career, he demonstrated a deep commitment to and passion for disability policy and the families that policy impacts. We are grateful for everything he did forward an agenda of equality and independence for everyone.

Several other Congressional champions for people with disabilities also will be leaving office this year including Senator Jay Rockefeller (WV); Senator Carl Levin(MI); Rep. Henry Waxman (CA); Rep. George Miller (CA); and Rep. John D. Dingell (MI).

Each contributed to the passage of major legislation which improved the status quo for people with disabilities and their families.  Their legacies include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Affordable Care Act (ACA), Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, which collectively impact millions of Americans.

This video honoring the retiring Members of Congress was jointly developed by six national organizations – The Arc, American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Association of University Centers on Disabilities, National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities, Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered, and United Cerebral Palsy.

 

 

A Tribute to Disability Activist Stella Young

Stella Young

“I use the term porn deliberately because they objectify one group of people for the benefit of another group of people.” – Stella Young on “inspiration porn” images of people with disabilities.

The headlines are heavy today with the news that comedian and journalist Stella Young unexpectedly passed away over the weekend at the age of 32. Many of you may recognize Stella’s face if not her name from the video of her TED talk in April of 2014, which has been widely shared on You Tube and social media and racked up millions of views worldwide.

Stella was born with Osteogensis Imperfecta, a genetic disorder causing bones to break easily. She used a wheelchair, although she’d be quick to point out that this fact does not automatically turn her into a noble inspiration for the rest of humanity.

“Stella’s frank way of making her point, with her razor-sharp wit wrapped in a genuinely warm and inviting smile will be missed in the world of disability advocacy,” said Stephen Bennett, CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “We all talk about the same issues Stella talked about, but she really knew how to present things in a way in which people had to stop and take notice.”

“Just a few months ago, our national external affairs staff viewed Stella’s TED Talk in preparation for a deeper discussion of how nonprofit organizations portray people with disabilities in our communications, marketing and development materials,” said Ruben Gonzales, Chief Development Officer of UCP. “It was so valuable for our staff members without disabilities to get that perspective.”

In honor of Stella and her work, here’s a link to ABC’s website with a list of “17 Things Stella Wants You to Know as demonstrated in quotes from her work.

A New Way of Connecting for People with CP

Frantz Alexis Headshot

Guest post by Frantz Alexis

One of the frustrations I have dealt with because I have cerebral palsy is that it is often difficult to find other people like me, who have CP, to talk to. The growth of the internet, specifically social media, has been very helpful in addressing that issue. Facebook groups, online forums, and the web have been invaluable resources. However, I still struggle with using these resources, as they often associate my posts with who I am and there is not a way to delete a post once I put it out there. I would bet that anyone with a health issue can empathize with the desire to communicate with others anonymously about some of the more private or potentially embarrassing aspects of their condition.

A few months ago I posted a question about my orthotics in a Facebook group for people who have CP. The question wasn’t that embarrassing. However, I didn’t want it exposed to a large audience.  Imagine my surprise a few weeks later when I was having dinner with a family member and she asked if I was able to resolve the issue. Apparently, the post was visible to anyone who was friends with me on Facebook! Needless to say, I was not happy. I wanted a way to ask these types of questions anonymously. After my experience on Facebook I started doing some research and many folks expressed interest in such an app.

Recently, I launched an app which couple of friends and I developed – Candor CP.  The app lets people chat anonymously with others who have CP. Having something like this app would have been like a gift from heaven when I was an adolescent (truthfully, it’s a godsend now). Growing up I had no one to talk with about some of the challenges of being different from everyone in my community. If I was ever frustrated or embarrassed, and it did happen on occasion, I had no one to chat with that could relate to my experience.

A couple of years ago I was researching having yet another surgery to manage the symptoms of my CP. On paper, the procedure looks very scary and fraught with risks,  my doctors and some friends advised me against having it done. The term “crazy” was thrown around quite a bit. While continuing to research the surgery I stumbled upon a Facebook group for people who have had it done.  It would be quite the understatement of the year to say that the people I was able to chat with in that group were instrumental in my decision to go forward with the surgery. Since I tend to be a private person I found that I communicated with members of the group mostly via private message. During these chats I learned quite a bit about the procedure, it’s benefits, and what it felt like coming out on the other side of the surgery. The personal endorsements from my new friends is what helped to confirm that I was making the right decision regarding having the surgery.  It’s a shame that their insights are locked away in my inbox and not publicly so that others can benefit. The surgery changed my life and gave me the ability to do amazing things like complete a Spartan Sprint. This is yet another example of how beneficial communicating with other CPers has been for me and can be for others.

Since launching the app there have been awesome conversations on a variety of topics: dating, surgeries, treatments and even fashion advice! It was also covered in a blog post by a Huffington Post blogger who also has CP.

I am very happy to see that people have found the app to be as helpful as I do!  I wanted to create the app because I learned first hand how powerful sharing experiences can be for people who medical conditions and I knew that there were people who were not sharing because there was no way to do so in an anonymous way. Candor CP is here to fill that gap!

Frantz Alexis
Frantz Alexis is a Product Manager in New York City he can be reached via email at frantzsdr@gmail.com.

I Give Thanks Every Day

A Message from Stephen Bennett

“At this time of year, many of us start to reflect on what we are thankful for – family, friends, our home, our health. For me, being thankful is part of what I do every day. 

Stephen Bennett

UCP President and CEO, Stephen Bennett

Just like you, I am thankful for many things, not the least of which is the fact that I get to do what I do for a living. My career started in California when I served as a caregiver for people with disabilities. I was part of a sea change as large institutions were closed and many people with disabilities were able to live in their communities for the first time.

Although there were challenges, I was thankful for what I knew would be a positive change in society. When I came to UCP I was thankful that a national network existed to serve people with disabilities and their families. I was thankful that so many professionals and experts were working together to provide the essential services, support, advice and advocacy needed by 176,000 people with a broad range of disabilities every day. And, I was thankful that I could lead a national office, which would support that network with a voice in Washington, D.C, and national programs such as My Child Without Limits, which provides valuable resources and information to parents of young children with disabilities.

Tuesday, December 2 is #GivingTuesday – a day on which everyone is urged to donate to a favorite cause after the madness of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. It’s meant to remind us that there are always more important things in life than holiday shopping. I hope you will join us by making a donation to UCP. If you give on #GivingTuesday, the Network for Good has promised to us $1 for every $20 we raise.

I am so very thankful for you – our supporters – who donate to ensure that this organization remains strong and move forward. As we close out this year and look forward, I encourage you to get involved and continue to support UCP. ”

Thank you!

SB_sig_transparent

Stephen Bennett signatureStephen Bennett, UCP President & CEO

 

#GivingTuesday

#GivingTuesday

 

The Five “P”s for Reducing Holiday Stress

We can’t promise you a stress-free holiday season any more than we can promise you a white Christmas, but there are some common sense tips which can help children with disabilities (and their parents!) make it to the end of the holiday season relatively unscathed. We call them the Five “P”s

Gingerbread CookieWe should stress – no pun intended – that when you mix family gatherings, religious or cultural traditions, crowds, noise, lights and sometimes travel, no one is immune to the stress. It’s not just a child with autism who may become over-stimulated or a child with a physical disability who may be exhausted or frustrated. The annual holiday season “melt-down” is to be expected from children of all types and abilities, and maybe some grown-ups too.

The key is managing expectatons. Knowing what is most likley to cause stress for your child during the holidays and having a plan for that eventuality is the easiest route to minimizing problems.

PREPARING

It starts with preparing both your child and your family for what’s to come. Start early with holiday stories, books and movies to help your child understand what it’s all about. Practice traditions in small doses such as a trial-run at a formal sit down dinner with just the immediate family before you add in aunts, uncles and cousins. Take a trip to church or synagogue and explain what will be different about the ceremonies during the holidays. Play holiday music around the house or experiment with lighting candles if that will be something new for your child.  If your child uses a walker or a wheelchair, practice navigating through Uncle John’s house or whereever you are likely to spend time during the festivities if you can.

PLANNING

Then have a solid plan for when things don’t go as expected. Set up an escape route or a safe space so the child can retreat if things get to be too much. Let your friends and relatives know that this isn’t a big deal and there’s no need to make a fuss if your child needs to take a break. Bring a favorite toy from home, a snack, or an iPad to offer your child when they don’t want to – or can’t – go with the flow. Reassure your child that they can take a break anytime they wish and go over how to do so – maybe even set up a code word so your child can signal you that they are having a hard time without drawing too much attention to themselves.

PARTICIPATION

Make sure there is a way they can participate. Scope out venues and ask about holiday gathering plans ahead of time to find a way for your child to be included in the festivities to whatever extend they feel comfortable. Will they be able to be placed at the same table with everyone during dinner? Will they have a good view of the holiday pageant? Will they be included in games with other children? Figure out how this can happen and prepare any necessary accommodations ahead of time.

PAMPERING

Be sure to have everything necessary for your child to be as comfortable as they would normally be at home. Don’t force outfits that are itchy, or dress shoes that are tight just for the sake of appearances. And, don’t expect them to stay up far later, walk far further or stand or sit far longer than they normally would just because it’s a “special occasion.”

PATIENCE

Don’t rush. And, don’t overbook! Tell your relatives and friends that you expect them to be flexible. If you miss the beginning of services or don’t stay for dessert, that is just a fact of life that isn’t going to ruin anything. For a child with a disability it may take longer to get ready, or to get from one place to another and things will simply have to go at a slower pace. The more relaxed you are about time, the more relaxed your child will be as well.  After all, the season is about so much more than gifts and parties. It’s about celebrating together as a family – a family that includes a child with a disability.

 

Happy Holidays!

 

USAID Gives $2.2 Million to UCP Wheels for Humanity

UCP Wheels for Humanity (UCP Wheels), a subsidiary of United Cerebral Palsy of Los Angeles, Ventura & Santa Barbara Counties, has received a $2.2 million grant from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and JSI Research & Training Institute to support Project CLASP, a project which will improve and streamline the supply-chain for wheelchairs worldwide and supply over 15,000 wheelchairs to those in need around the world.Wheels for Humanity

CLASP (Consolidating Logistics for Assistive Technology Supply & Provision) is a two-year project in collaboration with ten international partners in Indonesia, Philippines, Georgia, Romania, Nicaragua, El Salvador & several other nations to improve the quality, selection and volume of wheelchairs provided in each country. In partnership with supply-chain experts Jones Lang LaSalle, UCP Wheels will consolidate inventory from five international manufacturers in a single hub, so that a variety of locally appropriate wheelchairs can be acquired from a single location.

“UCP Wheels for Humanity’s is the ideal organization to lead this project,” says Sue Eitel, Senior Rehabilitation Advisor at USAID. “Their proven track record of successful wheelchair provision projects and international partnerships makes them an industry leader.”

“Project CLASP addresses a serious barrier confronting the wheelchair industry which leads to people with disabilities worldwide not receiving wheelchairs that meet their personal needs,” says UCP Wheels Chief Executive Officer, Ronald S. Cohen, Ph.D. “This project will allow UCP Wheels and other organizations to give the life-changing gift of mobility to more people in need, more efficiently.”

UCP Wheels for Humanity was founded in 1996 to increase access to mobility for children and adults with physical disabilities who live in developing countries. UCP Wheels provides appropriately fitted wheelchairs and quality of life services to more than 6,000 individuals each year and acts as an advocate and capacity-building partner to local organizations, creating sustainable, community-based systems that support long-term change.

 

Design-athon Draws Innovators

Enabled by Design-athon: DC Edition drew a diverse crowd of creative innovators excited by the potential to solve everyday challenges faced by people with disabilities. More than 160 people from as far away as India, Boston, Atlanta and San Francisco registered to attend the kick off event held Wednesday evening at the Martin Luther King Memorial Library. Lightning talks aimed to introduce attendees to some of the unique challenges faced by people with disabilities and some of the inspirations that led to innovation, while a social hour hosted by Design Thinking DC introduceDay 1 Team Meetingd participants to each other in anticipation of the workshop ahead.

Adrienne Biddings, Policy Council for Google talked about Google’s cadre of developers and engineers, many of whom had little knowledge of disability but who are always trained in accessible design within a month of joining Google’s team.

Brett Heising, the CEO & Founder of BrettApproved, related his own personal experiences as a person who uses a wheelchair in finding accessible travel accommodations – experiences which let to his start-up of a website offering reviews of destinations for travelers with disabilities.

Maria Town, founder of the blog CP Shoes, read aloud her “love letter” to shoe brand Converse and creatively brought home the love/hate relationship people with cerebral palsy sometimes have with their shoes and how an item others take for granted can play an outsized role in the life of a person with a disability.

Diego Marsical, founder of 2Gether International and a paralympian gave the crowd of 150 at the library a sense of the international disability community and the importance of the diversity of people with disabilities.

Phillip Reeves of DC Department of Small Business Development encouraged ambitious innovators to go for government funding, reminding them that the “Roomba” was once considered a weapon  to prove  a point about how government agencies such as the Department of Defense a are ready and able to fund high risk/high reward projects.

The talks ended with John Salmen, President of Universal Designers & Consultants, Inc. with an enlightening outline of the concept of universal design, or design for all.

Early the next morning 10 teams of eight participants each gathered at Google to start the Deisgn-athon workshop which would end with workable ideas to improve the lives of people with disabilities. The teams were greeted by Bob Gootzit from PCS Engineering 3D PrinterPSC Engineering 3D Printers3_D Printers

 

 

 

 

 

 

With access to a Cube Pro Duo and Cube Gen Three from PCS Engineering and the assistance of two experienced 3-D printer operators, the teams would have the latest technology to help bring their ideas to life.

Working in the hallsBut before they were able to take advantage of the printers, they first had come together as a team and come up with an idea. Mentors with disabilities and team facilitators kept teams on track, leading the teams through empathy exercises designed to simulate some aspects of certain disabilities. Often the empathy exercises led to brainstorms about how to tackle the very challenges the teams had just experienced.

By Friday afternoon, a  judge’s panel including UCP Chief Operating Officer Chris Thomson, Google’s Policy Council Adrienne Biddings, and Brett Heising, founder of  www.brettapproved.com, was evaluating 10 minute pitches from each team, who tried to convince the panel their product idea should win.

Judged on their idea’s innovation, feasibility, marketability and other factors, the teams sweated under the lights on a small stage at Google’s state-of-the-art D.C. offices. They were peppered with questions about how the products might work, who they might serve and how they might go about bringing them to market.Sketching 2

“If you plan on keeping your profit margins low, then what’s in it for an investor?”

“Have you researched the cost of raw materials?”

“How often would this software be updated?”

Tough questions for a skilled entrepreneur, much less a team of diverse participants who only met each other Wednesday night and had less than 36-hours to dream, develop and dig in to the nitty-gritty of creating their prototype and their pitch.

In the end, three teams walked away with praise and prizes from Google and TechShop.

The Judges’ Choice Award was presented for the concept of a browser plugin for Chrome to add on-demand definitions for idioms designed for people with autism and/or English-language learner. (created by Sirjay Kasturi, Sudhita Kasturi, Sun Chee Blair, David MacPherson, Amnah Azizi, Susan Herngenrather, Lindsay Schultz and Celene Moore). Each team member was awarded a Google Chromebook.

DSC_4621

The People’s Choice Award was presented to the team who came up with clip bracelet designed to provide stability for a hand with low-dexterity (created by Emily Flax, Clarice Torrey, Benjamin VanSelous, Jessica Bonness, Jessica Denson, Mike Ellis and John Levy). Each team member was awarded a membership to TechShop.

People's Choice

Best Prototype was awarded to the 3-D printed design for a relatch tool for keeping public bathroom doors with broken latches closed (created by Bita Salehi, Ken Ward, Mully Zacharia, Bagais Reem, Michelle Bendit, Jacob Johnson, Mallory Anderson, and R J Heller). Each team member was awarded a Google Chromecast.

Best Prototype

Other ideas included an ATV-style modular customized wheelchair, a compression sock using biometals, a shoe key, a magnetic opener, a “smart” pill dispenser, a commuter app to aggregate data for people with disabilities and an app to help caregivers record instructions for later review.

Design-athon is an initiative of United Cerebral Palsy’s Life Labs, which fosters innovation in design and technology for people with disabilities and is held each fall. Find out more about UCP, Life Labs and Design-athon online.

 

Special Thanks to our Sponsors and Partners:
Google, CareerBuilder, TechShop, Sprint Relay, CEA Foundation, Sugru, PCS Engineering, Design Thinking DC, George Washington University’s Corcorcan School of the Arts, Marymount University, Mt. Ida College, and Coroflot

 

 

 

#HalloweenWithoutLimits Contest Crowns Most Creative Costume

In October, UCP hosted a social media contest to find the most inventive, creative and limitless costume for children (or adults) with disabilities. Between October 6 and October 30, more than 50 ingenious entries appeared on UCP’s Facebook and Twitter pages where they competed for “votes” – the most likes, shares and comments – using the hashtag #HalloweenWithoutLimits.

Each of the five winners pictured here will receive a 5-lb. bar of Hershey’s Milk Chocolate and will be featured in UCP’s Full Spectrum e-newsletter on Monday, November 3. The pick for Most Creative Costume made by UCP’s national staff will also win a chocolate bar and be asked to tell the story of their costume on the Voices of UCP blog.

 

Out of more than 16,000 total votes, the winners are:

Dorothy/Wizard of OzThe Little MermaidET Phone Home

 

Princess with Horse-Drawn CarriageBatman

Most Creative Costume Voted on by the UCP National Staff Is: 

Lost Her Head!

 

Honorable Mentions: 

SpidermanDay of the DeadHonorable Mentions

Snow White  ESPN

You can see the final contest entries in a photo album on our Facebook page.

Thank you to our partner, The Hershey Company, for donating the prizes!

Hershey's, The Hershey Company