WineBev Creating Opportunity to “Work Without Limits”

The Napa Valley is known for gorgeous weather and of course for wine. UCP’s affiliate in the Napa Valley area, UCP of the North Bay, works to bring together the wine industry and individuals with disabilities. WineBev Services began in 2007 and is helping to acknowledge the need for labor in the region, while opening doors for more accessible and competitive employment for people with disabilities. “It was a natural fit given the area,” says Mike Lisenko, President of Business Operations for WineBev.

 

WineBev works with around 15 to 20 wineries in the area at any given time during the season. They currently employ 115 individuals with disabilities, working in all areas – from packing to fulfillment. Potential employees are referred to WineBev from the local regional center in Napa, which helps to pair individuals with providers in the community. Candidates go through a job skills training course before finding the area that best suits their skills. WineBev provides both community-based and supportive employment. They also work with the the hospitality industry in the area, giving greater flexibility to area employers and finding roles that best suit each individual employee’s strengths.

 

WineBev estimates that nearly 200 individuals have come through the program, with several finding employment on their own after their time there. At UCP of the North Bay, living a “life without limits” plays a role in every aspect of life – both work and play. At WineBev, “Work Without Limits” is more than just a tagline – it’s a purpose and flows through every facet of WineBev, from monitoring to packing, to creating employment opportunity for all.

 

Special thanks to Mike Lisenko, President of Business Operations for WineBev.

 

For more information on WineBev, please visit www.winebev.com.

 

To find out more about UCP of the North Bay and their programs, visit their website at http://ucpnb.org/.

 

UCP of Michigan Staff Invited to Attend Meeting Called by The Pope

Special thanks to Glenn Ashley, retired staff from UCP, for his assistance in working to help put this post together. 

UCP of Michigan’s Public Policy Specialist, Barb Valliere, was invited to attend the U.S. Regional Meeting of Popular Movements (RMOPM), which ran from February 16-19 in Modesto, CA.Part of international movements called by the Pope, the meeting in California brought together nearly 700 leaders from clergy members to grassroots leaders to provide input on a variety of social issues, including: job access and inclusion for people with disabilities, environmental issues, and racism. This meeting was the third in a series of international meetings (the previous two were held in Rome and Bolivia) aimed at bringing together members of the clergy and grassroots activists. For Barb, while the journey to California marked her first time on a plane, as Catholic woman with cerebral palsy it was an opportunity she could not pass up.

Ms. Valliere was one of three people invited from the Lansing, MI area to attend the meeting. Her invitation was a result of her leadership and work in community organizing efforts at the state and national levels. Initially, no one from the area was scheduled to speak, however, an issue with accessibility changed all of that. After requesting to be put in an accessible room, Barb was put in a room that was not accessible for her. The conference organizers were able to rectify the problem and accommodate her with another room. RMOPM asked her if she would like to address the entire assembly at dinner about the problem and her experience as person with a disability.


In her remarks to the assembly, she emphasized the importance of civil rights for people with disabilities. Attendees were reminded that when they plan events and invite people, to make sure to take care of their needs and have the event accessible to all, and to not assume that a space is accessible on word alone. She also encouraged other individuals with disabilities to advocate for yourself to ensure that your needs are met. Ms. Valliere made her point in community organizing fashion, encouraging event participants to move deeper into a  discussion on access and issues that affect the disability community.

 

Information for the blog was taken from movimientospopulares.org‘s press release.

Jeffrey Cooper, Recipient of the Kathy O. Maul Leadership Award at 2017 UCP Annual Meeting

Congratulations to Jeffrey Cooper, President, and CEO of UCP of Central Pennsylvania on being named the recipient of the Kathy O. Maul Leadership Award at the 2017 UCP Annual Meeting in Nashville, TN!

Thank you for all of your hard work, leadership, and dedication to individuals with disabilities!

Jeffrey Cooper, President, and CEO of UCP of Cental PA with Interim CEO of the UCP national office, Rick Forkosh.

UCP of Greater Cleveland Client Shines On The Job and Stuns On the Ice

 

Sharita Taylor is a client of UCP of Greater Cleveland. Sharita has autism, and first came to UCP in October 2009 because she was looking for job opportunities when she graduated from high school. Sharita’s story has a little ‘twist.’ When she’s not working, she’s shining on the ice and is heading to Austria for The Special Olympics World Winter Games!

Sharita Taylor on the ice. [Image description: A young African-American woman in her mid-20’s, wearing a yellow and blue dress. She is wearing ice skates and her arms sterched out in a pose.]

Sharita has been a UCP-contract employee at a bank processing center in Cleveland, OH since November 2009. She works in various departments in the bank, such as statement preparation, lockbox department, and image retrieval. Of her job, Sharita says: “I love the atmosphere and I love the people here!” “They make me feel at home. I love my job too! It keeps me up on my feet!” She says her favorite job is delivering documents to other departments as well as meeting and talking to people outside her division. Sharita also enjoys helping the Statement Prep Department with mailings. Sharita says that jumping from job to job is challenging for her, but she just tells herself to focus. Her job has taught her that multitasking can be a positive thing.

While Sharita thrives at her job at the bank, she is also very interested in theater and hopes to one day have a job in that field. She is active in UCP of Greater Cleveland’s Career Exploration Program, which assists clients in exploring a variety of job fields to see where their true passion lies. Sharita also ushers at the Beck Center for the Arts, a local visual and performing arts center.

When Sharita isn’t working or volunteering, she is an accomplished level-five figure skater, along with her twin sister Shaye. They both became involved in figure skating through the local Special Olympics chapter in Ohio. According to the U.S. Figure Skating Association, a level five figure skater has mastered basic figure skating skills such as a beginning spin and a hockey stop. In an interview with ABC News 5 in Cleveland, Sharita was the only athlete from Ohio invited to participate in the World Games. She will be participating in both figure skating and ice dancing in Austria.

 

To find out more about UCP of Greater Cleveland, you can visit their website here.

 

For a schedule of events for the 2017 Special Olympics World Winter Games, click here.

UCP Remembers Jack Schillinger

Gloria_Jack

On January 4, 2017, UCP lost a great friend, volunteer, supporter, leader and advisor with the passing of Jack Schillinger at the age of 96. Jack was the “face” of the Bellows Committee that he Chaired until recently, was Chair of the UCP Board of Directors in 1991, and was member of the Finance Committee for many years. In 2015, UCP honored Jack with the Chair Award at the Annual Conference in Chicago.

Jack was a huge part of UCP, since 1955,
and we can never thank him enough for his dedication to UCP and to the lives of people with disabilities.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the family at this difficult time. Jack’s obituary can be found within his guest book. To add a note of sympathy, give your condolences to the family, and to share your memories of Jack, please visit the Guest Book.

UCP and the National Council on Disability – “First Responders and Disability”

On December 9, 2016, UCP and the National Council on Disability joined together to host a day of conversation surrounding first responders and the disability community. Bringing together diverse perspectives from across the country, the day was a raw and honest look at the way law enforcement and other members of the first responder community interact with those living with disabilities.

Watch the footage (captioned) below:

 

View the Program Agenda

 

The RISE Act of 2016

RISE Act – The Respond, Innovate, Support, and Empower Act of 2016 (Bill S.2203)

Students living with a broad range of disabilities are enrolling at 4-year institutions more than ever before, but not all are completing their education. According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, students with learning disabilities (LD) enrolled at 4-year colleges or universities are completing their degrees at a rate of only 45%. For their non-disabled peers, the rate of completion for a 4-year degree currently stands at 53%. There are multiple factors that could be contributing to this rate. A new bill, The Respond, Innovate, Support, and Empower Act – or RISE Act, was introduced in the Senate on December 7, 2016 by Senators Bob Casey (D-PA), Orrin Hatch (R-UT), and Bill Cassidy (R-LA). This bill seeks to remove some of the most common barriers faced by students, and their families s, by requiring 4-year colleges and universities to adopt more transparent policies for their disability services – making it easier for students to obtain accommodations, services, and the supports they need throughout their college experience.

The RISE Act would amend the Higher Education Act (HEA) to clarify the types of documentation institutions of higher education must accept from students who are enrolling who have a disability. This would allow students to submit the same form(s)of documentation for proof of disability as they have done throughout their K-12 education. As stated in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, sufficient documentation for showing a student’s disability includes:

  • Previous documentation of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), including plans that may be both current and out-of-date;
  • Documentation of a 504 Education Plan;
  • Private school documentation of services;
  • A plan or record of disability from another institution of higher learning

In addition, the RISE Act would authorize $10 million in funds from the National Center for Information and Technical Support for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (an already existing program under the HEOA). The funds would go towards helping to better equip professors, teachers, and other facility and staff at colleges and universities to meet the growing needs of students with disabilities, including providing training, strategies, and help with providing accommodations. The RISE Act would also require all institutions of higher learning to adopt transparent policies regarding their disability services, and require them to widely share and disseminate that information to parents and families.

United Cerebral Palsy and the National Council on Disability Coming Together for “First Responders and Disability”

UCP-NCD2United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) and the National Council on Disability (NCD) are coming together to host a day long convening on December 9th, 2016, focusing on First Responders and the Disability Community. The discussion will center on first responder reform and the impact on the disability community.

The purpose of this discussion is to gather information and resources to inform NCD’s 2017 policy project focusing on how to transform the policies and practice around First Responders engagement with the disability community. This conversation will include experts in criminal justice reform, disability rights advocates, policymakers, law enforcement organizations, and individuals impacted by state violence directly.

Please join us from 9:30 am to 2:30 pm EST in person or tune in to the live stream.

For more information, including how to RSVP: Please click here.

See the program agenda here.

Read Speaker Bios here.

We’re Partnering With The Mighty!

We’re thrilled to announce a new partnership that will bring United Cerebral Palsy’s resources to the front of The Mighty‘s wide-reaching readership. We will now  have a growing home page on The Mighty , and appear on many stories on the site, allowing us to get many more people involved with our organization.

The Mighty is a story-based health community focused on improving the lives of people facing disease, disorder, mental illness, and disability. It is estimated that 764,000 children and adults in the U.S. manifest one or more of the symptoms of cerebral palsy, and that 1 in 5 Americans live with some form of disability. They want more than information. They want to be inspired. The Mighty publishes real stories about real people facing real challenges.

We’re dedicated to providing comprehensive support and community for children and adults living with cerebral palsy, as well as other disabilities, and their families. With this partnership, we’ll be able to help even more people.

We encourage you to submit a story to The Mighty and make your voice heard.

Here’s an example of the kind of stories you’ll find on The Mighty: Tommy Hilfiger Launches Adaptive Collection for Children With Disabilities

Share Your Photos for UCP’s “Halloween Without Limits”!

It’s that time of year again! It’s time for UCP’s “Halloween Without Limits.” From now until October 31st, share your most creative costume photos and show us how you celebrate a “Halloween Without Limits”! We want to see your style and how you make Halloween your own!

UCP’s “Halloween Without Limits” is open to all ages, children and adults alike, who get into the Halloween spirit. We invite parents and individuals with disabilities to share their most creative, kooky and fun costumes to our Facebook page by tagging @UnitedCerebralPalsy and using the hashtag #HalloweenWithoutLimits. It doesn’t matter if you’re a princess or a hero, a ghost or a ghoul, as long as you have gone the extra mile to accommodate a disability.

Photos of children under the age of 18 MUST be submitted by a parent or guardian.

The rules are simple:

All you have to do is post your photos to UCP’s Facebook page using #HalloweenWithoutLimits or #HWL so we can all see them!

Check out photos from last year! 

We can’t wait to see your photos!

HalloweenWL 2016