UCP’s “Halloween Without Limits” launches October 1!

United Cerebral Palsy is inviting Halloween revelers of all ages to enter our #Halloween Without Limits digital photo contest this October. No one should have to miss the fun of dressing up for Halloween because they have a disability which may not be accommodated by traditional costumes. Taking into account assistive technology such as wheelchairs and walkers or the sensory needs of children with Autism and Down syndrome can sometimes be a frustrating task. So, UCP is encouraging creativity by rewarding costumes designed to work specifically for the unique challenges faced by people with disabilities.

Stephen the PIrate

 

Beginning on October 1, we invite parents and individuals with disabilities to share their most creative, kooky and fun costumes to our Facebook page by tagging @UCPNational and using the hashtag #HalloweenWithoutLimits. It doesn’t matter if you’re a princess or a hero, a ghost or a ghoul, as long as you have gone the extra mile to accommodate a disability.

Winners will be chosen based on the number of combined “likes”, shares and comments. There will also be a “Most Creative Costume” chosen. Photos of children under the age of 18 must be submitted by a parent or guardian.

 

#HalloweenWithoutLimits How To: 

1. “Like” UCP on Facebook.

2. Upload your photo(s) to our Facebook wall, using the hashtag #HalloweenWithoutLimits (entries without the hashtag won’t be counted!)

3. Vote for your favorite photo(s) by “liking”, commenting or sharing throughout the month of October! Be sure to share to get votes from family and friends!

4. Wait for the winners to be announced on October 31 to see if you will get bragging rights for next year!

We can’t wait to see your costume creations!

Story Behind Viral Photo Better Than You Think

 

Dan Garringer_Viral Image

McDonald’s employee Kenny helps Dan Garringer with Meal

Chicago, IL (September 25, 2015) – The full story of the man pictured in a photo that went “viral” this week is even more touching than you might imagine. The snapshot posted to Facebook by a customer showed McDonald’s employee Kenny helping Dan Garringer cut and eat his food. Many news outlets reported that Dan ordered his food then requested some help from Kenny, who promptly closed his till at the busy Union Station restaurant and helped Dan eat his meal. More than 1 million people have liked and shared the photo on social media, with many commenting about Kenny’s compassion and kindness. Kenny was given special recognition by the owner/operator of his McDonald’s franchise.

What many of those commenters don’t realize is that this photo speaks volumes to those who know the story of Dan’s life. Dan has cerebral palsy and has strived his entire life to live as independently as possible as a participating and valued member of his community.

“People with disabilities are just like everyone else.  We love life and being part of our community.  We go to restaurants, stores, the movies and coffee shops and take Metra and public transportation to be able to experience life as everyone else does,” Dan said. “I know that Kenny is getting all of the credit, but, in my mind, he is representing all of the employees at the Union Station McDonald’s. They are wonderful, caring people who make me feel that I am just like everyone else, and they do not treat me like I am a person with a disability…they treat me like I am just Dan, someone that loves McDonald’s fries.”

In 1993, Dan and his wife Clarina – who passed away last year – moved in a group home where UCP Seguin of Greater Chicago can provide the support and services he needs. UCP Seguin is an affiliate of United Cerebral Palsy, a nonprofit organization for people with disabilities.

Dan spent his childhood with his family but moved into a nursing home as an adult, where he met and married his wife. For years he was told he was “too handicapped” to work. But after he connected with UCP Seguin, he worked with a case worker to pursue a writing career. For more than a decade, he wrote a column for his local newspaper Suburban Life called “The View from Here.” Using just a thumb and forefinger on one hand, Dan wrote about human potential and advocated for people with disabilities to be fully included in life – concepts neatly captured in this one image.

“Dan often wrote about experiences very much like this…and many times the opposite of this, as he was faced with discrimination, insults, and worse,” said Jim Haptonstahl, Executive Vice President of UCP Seguin “He has been overwhelmed by the reaction to this story. But he’s good with it, if it promotes greater acceptance and inclusion of people with disabilities in society.”

United Cerebral Palsy and its affiliates such as UCP Seguin advocate for that greater acceptance and inclusion, providing the services needed to ensure that people like Dan have the care, education, employment, housing and other opportunities they need.

“Every one of us has certain challenges,” said Jim. “Dan’s challenges mean he sometimes needs a little help from his fellow community members. Kenny gets that. And, that’s cool.”

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About UCP Seguin of Greater Chicago

Seguin of Greater Chicago is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit human services agency dedicated to enriching the lives of people with disabilities. Providing programs and services from birth to old age, UCP Seguin helps children and adults with disabilities achieve their potential, advance their independence and act as full members of the community. Its programs include innovative training and education, family support, employment and life-skills training, residential services, and foster care. For more information, visit www.ucpseguin.org.

 

Innovators with Disabilities to Pitch to Major Corporations

UCP’s Life Labs Holds Innovation Lab at USBLN National Conference

 

Washington, D.C. (September, 21, 2015) – United Cerebral Palsy has partnered with USBLN, a national nonprofit that helps businesses drive performance by leveraging disability inclusion, to host an Innovation Lab during USBLN’s 18th Annual National Conference & Biz2Biz Expo in Austin, TX at the end of September.

Innovation Lab, part of UCP’s Life Labs initiative. brings together innovators from all walks of life to compete on teams to dream up the next big idea for people with disabilities. Using human-centered principles of Universal Design, the teams work with mentors and facilitators to tackle problems ranging from mobility to communication in an effort to help improve the every day lives of people with disabilities.

At the conference, Innovation Lab teams will consist of participants of the Career Link Mentoring Program. The program is a collaboration of USBLN and Cornell University’s Employment and Disability Institute, which provides a 6-month career mentoring opportunity to college students and recent graduates with disabilities through linkages to business professionals from USBLN member companies.

“Rather than continuing to retrofit our world to accommodate people with disabilities, there’s no reason why we can’t encourage future designs to work for people of all abilities,” said Gabriel Forsythe Y Korzeniewicz, Life Labs Program Manager. “Past Innovation Lab events have included people with and without disabilities – from students to engineers, to physical therapists and people from a variety of backgrounds. We’re excited that this will be our first Lab in which all of the competitors have disabilities. We’re interested to see what kinds of unique ideas will come from this group.”

From September 27-29 the Innovation Lab teams will compete for one of two opportunities to pitch their ideas “Shark Tank”-style to major corporate players such as IBM, Sprint, Verizon, 3M and Mitsubishi – all part of USBLN’s membership of 5000 of the top companies in America. On September 30, each team’s idea will on display at the Bizt2iz Expo so conference attendees can vote on which two ideas to elevate to the level of a pitch to potential investors.

Join UCP in Helping to Spread Awareness for World CP Day on October 7!

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is one of the most complex and often misunderstood neurological disabilities across the world. CP affects each individual differently, with symptoms ranging in severity, from weakness in the limbs to complete lack of motor function. CP can come in many forms: Spastic (the most common), Ataxic, Syskinetic, or even a combination of types. Common signs of CP can include: a “floppy” appearance (specifically in the limbs), a delay in reaching milestones (like crawling or walking), or other delays.WCPD_CP_Diagnosis_Treatment_USA 

WCPD_2015_What_Is_CP_WORLD

Cultural beliefs are different around the world and for some, having a disability carries a cultural and social stigma. This can often lead to isolation of the individual with CP or shame on the mother.The stigma can have many ripple effects for the family of the person with CP or any other disability. One of the goals of World CP Day is to help make the public aware of CP and to help to end the misconceptions that surround it.

CP is a lifelong disability and there is no cure. Treatment for cerebral palsy can come in a range of different methods. If there are no steps taken to treat it, CP may cause the joints to worsen over time. Treatments can include both physical and occupational therapies.

UCP is proud to be apart of World CP Day on October 7 and the movement to help better understand Cerebral Palsy and the 17 million people worldwide who have it.