World CP “Invent It” Competition Brings Together Designers to Make a “Sponge House!”

“World Cerebral Palsy Day (World CP Day)” is a worldwide project with the goal to change the world for people living with cerebral palsy and other disabilities and their families.  World CP Day is celebrated on the first Wednesday in October, yet events go on year round. This year, World CP Day aims to make a difference in the local communities of those with CP. Each year the initiative introduces different challenges. From 2012-2014, World CP Day challenged engineers and designers to invent a product that would benefit people with CP.

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This past year, the challenge was to create a ‘Sponge House’ that went beyond only being wheelchair accessible. The Sponge House needed to accommodate to a large group of people with CP by having open spaces, soft floors, rounded edges and low surfaces. The idea of the Sponge House came from 6-year-old Sally Garster who lives in England and has CP and wanted a house made from soft materials that would protect her when she falls.

Winners of the 2015 Sponge House challenge are people from all across the globe. The number one winning team is a group from Canada who created A.B.L.E (Access a Better Living Environment). This team came up with a house that includes a lot of open spaces, mobility equipment, soft surfaces, and rounded corners. The next runner up was a product called The Bubble House created by two women in Australia. This house consisted of round surfaces with furniture that is mounded into the ground to prevent slipping and falling. This house also included a soft and sponge-like floor that is soft when impacted by a fall.

Next up was a project called Super Special Living created in New York! Inspired by their son, Garner Oh and his wife designed a house that has gentle curved bars that little hands can easily grasp along with shelves that encourage reaching and pulling to stand (once they have toys on them, of course). With soft padding on the floor and walls and no sharp edges to bump into, Super Special Living is a house that will not hurt you.

Show Us The Love!

We want to know what you love! Is it a day at the ballpark? Hanging out at the beach with your friends? Being around your dogs? Or does being around your family make your heart swell? UCP is officially launching a “Summer of Love!” We want to show the world that people with disabilities are just as passionate about their pursuits as people without disabilities. Please share a photo on our Facebook or Twitter page that shows us what – or who – you love the most. Whether it’s a snapshot of your sweetheart, or a pic of you engaged in your favorite pastime, we want to see it! There are no rules, just keep it family-friendly. There’s one thread that connects us all—people with disabilities and without, is love. Sharing your photo is easy! Just go to our Facebook page, give us a like and upload your photo on our wall. If Twitter is more your thing, give us a follow on Twitter and tweet us @UCPNational. Whatever way you choose to share, be sure to use the hashtag #SummerofLoveUCP! Follow us on our social media accounts and be sure to keep an eye on our website (UCP.org) to see a gallery of all of the submitted pictures!

The Shriver Snapshot Highlights Attitudes Towards Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities

While America gets ready to host the Special Olympics World Games and celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, The Shriver Report Snapshot: Insight into Intellectual Disabilities in the 21st Century shows a nation that is constantly changing. The poll was conducted by Harris Polling in partnership with Shriver Media and Special Olympics International.

The findings reveal that the more than half of Americans who have personal contact with someone with intellectual disabilities (I/DD) are and have far more accepting and positive attitudes. On the other hand, findings also show that the lack of contact leaves a legacy of misinformation, false stereotypes, ignorance and fear towards those with intellectual disabilities in the remaining half of Americans. So, experience and exposure are found to be the most important factor when it comes to one’s attitude towards people with I/DD.

Dropping the report in the midst of the Special Olympics, which welcomes more than 6,500 athletes representing 165 countries, is a great way to not only advocate how personal contact effects ones attitudes but also to give more people a chance to experience interacting with people with I/DD.

The Shriver report reveals that experience, inclusion and intervention are the best ways to abolish isolation, intolerance and injustice. Yet, 3 to 9 million people with I/D remain isolated from the rest of society. A whopping 42% of Americans have no personal contact with someone with an intellectual disability, and therefore cling to old judgements and stereotypes.

It is great to know that a vast majority of Americans believe that people with intellectual disabilities should be encouraged to be employed (93%), yet one in five respondents said that they would feel uncomfortable hiring someone with an intellectual disability. Because of this, only a shocking 5% of Americans know what it is like to work alongside someone with I/DD.

This study shows that millennial women ages 18-34 have the most progressive attitudes towards, and expectations for people with I/DD. They are in general the most progressive, inclusive, and compassionate group of all groups surveyed. Approximately 62% of these women would feel comfortable having their child date/marry someone with I/DD.

Although 89% of Americans reported feeling comfortable with their child being in a class with a child with I/DD, 4 in 10 Americans don’t believe children with I/DD should be educated in the same classroom as their peers without disabilities. While most of these statistics show a majority of people being accepting of people with I/DD, there is still a large percent of people who showed discomfort when it came to interacting with someone with an I/DD.

The findings highlighted in The Shriver Report Snapshot are both eye-opening and motivating. It is clear that there is still a lot of confusion about intellectual disabilities throughout America and how they should be dealt with. This report will give our country a better understanding of how we are currently dealing with I/DD and what areas we need to work on.

Champions of Change Honored at White House

WHChaps 1This week, staff from UCP National, along with several participants in our summer intern program, attended the Champions of Change ceremony at the White House in Washington, D.C. The program, “Disability Advocacy Across Generations” recognized the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act and nine “Champions of Change” selected by the Obama administration. Each champion has been very influential in the disability community and has brought about major changes, while facing obstacles of their own.

Champion Dilshad Ali, a mother of a son with autism, spoke about how disability is something that is hidden and never spoken of in her Muslim community. Ali discussed the importance of being able to access the support of one’s religious or cultural institutions as part of a panel on Effective Disability Advocacy. There was also Dior Vargas, a Latina woman who suffers with depression and anxiety. Vargas emphasized how many times disabilities are ‘invisible’, and therefore go unnoticed. She brought an interesting aspect to the table, and channeled people’s focus on another kind of disability, mental illnesses, which are often left out of the conversation on disability advocacy.

The day’s speakers included Jim Abbott, a former MLB pitcher and Olympian born without a right hand. Abbott has faced physical obstacles his whole life – especially in sports. He spoke about how he had to do things a little bit differently, but that is what got him to where he is today. He showed the audience how he adapted to pitching a baseball with one hand, and told stories about how former teachers and coaches who were open to “doing things differently,” giving him the opportunity to excel.

Another panel on Owning the Future: Disability, Diversity and Leadership included some Champions, who faced more communication barriers than others. Mike Ellis, who is deaf, explained more about his role at AT &T and working to ensure communication technology was accessible to all. Another champion, Catherine Hutchinson, experienced a severe brain injury and is now quadriplegic used a speech synthesizer to communicate.

At the end of the second panel, Derrick Coleman from the SuperBowl champion Seattle Seahawks worked to motivate the crowd to follow their dreams. He lost his hearing at the age of 3 and is the first deaf player in the NFL. Coleman told the audience to be themselves and love themselves.

U.S Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez closed out the event with information about current initiatives to improve upon worker rights, such as raising the federal minimum wage for all workers and echoed some of the panelist’s comments about the importance of participation in the workforce to true inclusion and independence.

Facing the Day with Dignity

Today is the 25th anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This landmark legislation guaranteed increased access for people with disabilities in almost every facet of community life. The doors to full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for persons with disabilities opened metaphorically and literally in many cases.

11JE04GDAs an organization which serves and supports people with a broad range of disabilities and their families, UCP is keenly aware of the profound difference this singular act made in the lives of so many people – whether they realize it or not.

 

At the 25 year mark, there now exists an entire generation of people with disabilities who have matured into adulthood under the legal protections of the ADA. They expect accessible entrances to public building, wheelchair ramps and curb cuts, closed-captioning and sign language interpreters, and accessible public transportation options. And, for 20-somethings without disabilities, these accommodations have become a part of their consciousness as well. Even if they don’t experience disability personally, many people benefit from the changes brought about by the ADA. Just think of the young mother with a stroller who no longer has to deal with high curbs at each crosswalk.

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However, there are still physical and attitudinal challenges to overcome and advocates are still needed. Every year, investigations are open and lawsuits are filed over issues of ADA compliance. And, every year, government officials, disability experts, lawyers and judges debate the meaning and application of various provisions in the law. Are the drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft independent contractors, not necessarily bound by the ADA? Are service animals always allowed in public school classrooms no matter the circumstances? What, exactly, do the words “reasonable accommodations” mean?

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Like any other law, we will continue to debate the details and try to adapt interpretation of the now decades-old language to a rapidly changing landscape. However, we think that the true accomplishment of the ADA will not ultimately be judged by changes to transportation, education, or access to a local public library. The real victory to be claimed by the disability advocates and allies who worked for the law is the opportunity it provides for people with disabilities to face each new day with dignity that comes with full equality.

 

Regardless of the tactics it employs, the law explicitly states that:

 

“Physical or mental disabilities in no way diminish a person’s right to fully participate in all aspects of society…

 

It makes the unequivocal statement that in the eyes of Congress, representatives of “We the People,” people with disabilities are people, first and foremost, as well as full citizens of the United States. It is a recognition that the aspects of our society which prevent a person with a disability from being fully able to participate need to be addressed and Congress intends to provide a “…national mandate for the elimination of discrimination against individuals with disabilities.” It is the law of the land and confirmation that people with disabilities should never again have to accept anything less than opportunities provided to their peers.

Comedians with Disabilities Come Together to Break Down Barriers

Twenty five years ago, before the passage of the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there likely would have been physical barriers in clubs and theaters, challenges at airports and in hotels or other issues that would make it difficult, difficult if not impossible, for Michael Aronin, Shanon DeVido, Tim Grill, and Mike Murray to mount a full-fledged comedy tour.

In 2015, accessibility in public places has improved and with it the attitudes of many toward people with disabilities such as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, hearing impairment and spinal muscular atrophy. However, for many who don’t have a close friend or family member with a disability, there are still misconceptions and a lack of understanding. Employers can still be reluctant to hire people with disabilities, especially in the entertainment industry where there is a perception that audiences won’t respond well.

So, the comedians set out on a mission to bridge the gap with laughter. Wicked wit forged from a lifetime of dealing with adversity, No Comic Left Behind smashes stereotypes with every joke: people with disabilities are really no different from you and I. Set-ups on relationships, jobs, and family come with punch lines about wheelchairs and the underrated benefits of being deaf.

“Comedy is a great way to break down that barrier that people often have when they’re talking with people with disabilities,” said Shannon DeVido.

The comedians have long understood that laughter is the best medicine. Michael Aronin, who nearly died at birth and now has cerebral palsy, uses humor to coach audiences toward their career goals as a motivational speaker. And, Tim Grill was born with spina bifida, going through thirteen surgeries to enable him to walk. Rounded out by experienced performer and wheelchair user Shannon DeVido and Mike Murray, who was deaf until the age of 40 when Cochlear implants brought him into the hearing world, each comic is eager to raise awareness about disability.

Collectively, performing under the banner of No Comic Left Behind, the quartet is determined to follow their mission across the country in clubs, theaters and universities. Their ultimate goal is to expose as broad of an audience as possible through, raising awareness about the inherent abilities of people with disabilities. Once the audience is laughing, it becomes much easier to talk about the serious stuff and make people think about what they can do to better include people with disabilities in everyday life.

“Think about it,” said Tim Grill. “We can win over 100 or more people with each show just by being funny – which is something we do on daily basis anyway. Then those 100 people go back out into the world feeling a lot less uncomfortable around people with disabilities and help spread the love. They’ll be more likely to think about accessibility and inclusion and more likely to have some understanding of the next person with a disability that they meet.”

 

For more information about No Comic Left Behind, check out their website!

You can also watch a short video featuring the comics of No Comic Left Behind on UCP’s Youtube Channel!

How Well Does Your State Serve People with Disabilities?

Arizona, Maryland, Missouri, New York & Hawaii Top 2015 Case for Inclusion Rankings

 

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2015 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report and interactive website used to track state-by-state community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

To download and read the entire Case for Inclusion report or explore the data, visit cfi.ucp.org.

TCase for Inclusionhe annual Case for Inclusion examines data and outcomes for all 50 States and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators. These indicators include how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. The report is a product of a comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

In addition to rankings, the report digs deeper into two critical issues facing people with disabilities and their families: waiting lists for services and support and transitioning from high school into an adult life in the community.

Since 2006, the rankings have enabled families, advocates, the media and policymakers to measure each state’s progress or lack of improvement and gain insight into how the highest-ranking states are achieving their success. An interactive website allows visitors to compare and contrast results among selected states and dig deeper into the data.

The report puts each State’s progress into a national context to help advocates and policymakers in their missions to improve life for people with disabilities and their families.

  • Advocates should use this information to educate other advocates, providers, families and individuals, policymakers and state administrations on areas needing improvement. The data can support policy reforms and frame debates about resource allocation. Advocates can also use the information to prioritize those areas that need immediate attention and support funding to maintain high quality outcomes, eliminate waiting lists and close large institutions.
  • Elected officials should use this report as a guide on which issues and States need time and attention and, possibly, more resources or more inclusive policies.
  • Federal and State administrations should use this report to put their work and accomplishments in context and to chart a course for the next focus area in the quest for continuous improvement and improved quality of life.

Stephen Bennett“Ultimately, the goal of all of this is to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for all Americans,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “UCP is committed to shining a light on how well states are actually serving people with disabilities and, by extension, their families and communities. Also, we want to provide the proper national context for this data so that we can truly use it to drive progress.”

 

How is your state doing? 

 

  1. All States still have room for improvement, but some States have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#47), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50) primarily due to the small portion of people and resources dedicated to those in small or home-like settings in these four states. Mississippi and Texas also do not participate in NCI.
  1. 32 States, down from 38, meet the 80/80 Home and Community Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community and 80 percent of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for home (less than 7 residents per setting) and community support. Those that do not meet the 80/80 standard are Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Virginia.
  1. As of 2013, 14 States report having no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Another 10 States have only one institution each (Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming). Since 1960, 220 of 354 state institutions have been closed (5 more in the past year alone), and 13 more are projected to close by 2016 in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey (3), New York (2), Oklahoma (2), Tennessee (2) and Virginia (2).
  2. For people with disabilities life should be without limits26 States, up from 18, now report meeting the 80 percent Home-Like Setting Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in settings such as their own home, a family home, family foster care or small group settings like shared apartments with fewer than four residents. The U.S. average for this standard is 79 percent. Just eight States meet a top-performing 90 percent Home-like Setting Standard: Arizona, California, Colorado, D.C., Hawaii, Nevada, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
  1. Ten States, up from seven last year, report at least 10 percent of individuals using self-directed services, according to the National Core Indicators survey in 29 States. These States include Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Utah and Virginia.
  1. 42 States, up from 39 last year, participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) survey, a comprehensive quality-assurance program that includes standard measurements to assess outcomes of services. A total of 29 States, a 50% increase from last year, reported data outcomes in 2014.
  1. Only 14 States report that they are supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). These support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together, and people with disabilities living in a community setting. These family-focused state programs were in Arizona, California, Delaware, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Alabama and Pennsylvania reported that they were providing higher levels of family support in last year’s ranking.
  1. Just 8 States, down from 10 last year, report having at least 33 percent of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment. These States include Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire (newly added), New Mexico, Oklahoma, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia (newly added). Louisiana, Nebraska, Oregon and Virginia reported that they met this threshold in last year’s ranking, but reported a decrease in competitive employment this year.
  1. 14 States report successfully placing at least 60 percent of individuals in vocational rehabilitation in jobs, with fifteen States reporting the average number of hours worked for those individuals placed being at least 25 hours. Three States report at least half of those served got a job within one year. Only California met the standard on all three success measures this year compared to last year’s ranking, when Nebraska and South Dakota were the only two states to report meeting all three thresholds.
  1. Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and show the unmet need. More than 322,000 people, 5,000 more than last year, are on a waiting list for Home and Community-Based Services. This requires a daunting 44 percent increase in States’ HCBS programs. 16 States, a decrease from 22 last year, report no waiting list or a small waiting list (requiring less than 10 percent program growth).

2013_donation_overlay_buttonYour support makes The Case for Inclusion possible each year. Make a gift today to help UCP continue to fulfill its mission of a Life Without Limits for people with disabilities and their families by providing advocacy, support and services. 

UCP Releases Case for Inclusion Rankings and Report

Arizona, Maryland, Missouri, New York & Hawaii Top 2015 List

 

Washington, D.C. (July 16, 2014) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) released the 2015 Case for Inclusion today, an annual report and interactive website used to track state-by-state community living standards for Americans living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

The Case for Inclusion examines data and outcomes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), ranking each on a set of key indicators, including how people with disabilities live and participate in their communities, if they are satisfied with their lives, and how easily the services and supports they need are accessed. By taking these factors into account, UCP is able to publish this comprehensive analysis of each state’s progress or failures in providing critical services to individuals living with disabilities.

In addition to rankings, the report digs deeper into two critical issues facing people with disabilities and their families: waiting lists for services and support and transitioning from high school into an adult life in the community. Two case studies examine how states are approaching those issues.

Since 2006, the rankings have enabled families, advocates, the media and policymakers to measure each state’s progress or lack of improvement and gain insight into how the highest-ranking states are achieving their success. To enhance the usability of the report, UCP publishes tables of the data from which the report was compiled on an interactive website where visitors can compare and contrast results among selected states.

“Ultimately, the goal of all of this is to promote inclusion and enhance the quality of life for all Americans,” said Stephen Bennett, President and CEO of United Cerebral Palsy. “UCP is committed to shining a light on how well states are actually serving people with disabilities and, by extension, their families and communities. Also, we want to provide the proper national context for this data so that we can truly use it to drive progress.”

To download and read the entire Case for Inclusion report or explore the data tables, visit cfi.ucp.org.

 

Significant Takeaways from the 2015 Ranking

Promoting Independence

  1. All States still have room for improvement, but some States have consistently remained at the bottom since 2007, including Arkansas (#49), Illinois (#47), Mississippi (#51) and Texas (#50) primarily due to the small portion of people and resources dedicated to those in small or home-like settings in these four states. Mississippi and Texas also do not participate in NCI.
  1. 32 States, down from 38, meet the 80/80 Home and Community Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in the community and 80 percent of all resources spent on those with ID/DD are for home (less than 7 residents per setting) and community support. Those that do not meet the 80/80 standard are Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Virginia.
  1. As of 2013, 14 States report having no state institutions to seclude those with ID/DD, including Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Another 10 States have only one institution each (Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming). Since 1960, 220 of 354 state institutions have been closed (5 more in the past year alone), according to the University of Minnesota’s Research and Training Center on Community Living. Another 13 more are projected to close by 2016 in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey (3), New York (2), Oklahoma (2), Tennessee (2) and Virginia (2)
  1. 26 States, up from 18, now report meeting the 80 percent Home-Like Setting Standard, which means that at least 80 percent of all individuals with ID/DD are served in settings such as their own home, a family home, family foster care or small group settings like shared apartments with fewer than four residents. The U.S. average for this standard is 79 percent. Just eight States meet a top-performing 90 percent Home-like Setting Standard: Arizona, California, Colorado, D.C., Hawaii, Nevada, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
  1. Ten States, up from seven last year, report at least 10 percent of individuals using self-directed services, according to the National Core Indicators survey in 29 States. These States include Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Utah and Virginia.

Tracking Health, Safety and Quality of Life

  1. 42 States, up from 39 last year, participate in the National Core Indicators (NCI) survey, a comprehensive quality-assurance program that includes standard measurements to assess outcomes of services. A total of 29 States, a 50% increase from last year, reported data outcomes in 2014.

Keeping Families Together

  1. Only 14 States report that they are supporting a large share of families through family support (at least 200 families per 100,000 of population). These support services provide assistance to families that are caring for children with disabilities at home, which helps keep families together, and people with disabilities living in a community setting. These family-focused state programs were in Arizona, California, Delaware, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Alabama and Pennsylvania reported that they were providing higher levels of family support in last year’s ranking.

Promoting Productivity

  1. Just 8 States, down from 10 last year, report having at least 33 percent of individuals with ID/DD working in competitive employment. These States include Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire (newly added), New Mexico, Oklahoma, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia (newly added). Louisiana, Nebraska, Oregon and Virginia reported that they met this threshold in last year’s ranking, but reported a decrease in competitive employment this year.
  1. 14 States report successfully placing at least 60 percent of individuals in vocational rehabilitation in jobs, with fifteen States reporting the average number of hours worked for those individuals placed being at least 25 hours and three States reporting at least half of those served getting a job within one year. Only California met the standard on all three success measures this year compared to last year’s ranking, when Nebraska and South Dakota were the only two states to report meeting all three thresholds.

Serving Those in Need

  1. Waiting lists for residential and community services are high and show the unmet need. More than 322,000 people, 5,000 more than last year, are on a waiting list for Home and Community-Based Services. This requires a daunting 44 percent increase in States’ HCBS programs. 16 States, a decrease from 22 last year, report no waiting list or a small waiting list (requiring less than 10 percent program growth).

Cheryl Hines wins BIG for people with disabilities!

UCP’s Celebrity Ambassador, actress Cheryl Hines (Curb Your Enthusiasm, Suburbgatory) appeared on last night’s episode of Celebrity Family Feud competing on behalf of United Cerebral Palsy and people with disabilities. Cheryl has a nephew with cerebral palsy and has been a strong supporter of UCP for many years.
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Cheryl Hines and her Family. Photo from The University of Central Florida website.

Cheryl and her team, which consisted of her sister Rebecca, her brothers Chris and Michael and their mom, Rosemary, took the prize from family of television personality Niecy Nash (Reno 911). Team Hines big win raised $25,000 to be donated to UCP!
Congratulations to Cheryl and her family on their BIG WIN and helping support “A Life Without Limits” for people with disabilities and their families!
Though we may not all be as lucky as Cheryl and her family to be on Family Feud, you can still help to provide support and resources to people with disabilities and their families and contribute to our mission to provide “A Life Without Limits!” Find out more about how you can make a difference or donate today!