AARP Releases State Scorecard on Long-Term Services and Supports for Older Adults, People with Physical Disabilities, and Family Caregivers

 

This State Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) Scorecard is the first of its kind: a multidimensional approach to measure state-level performance of LTSS systems that provide assistance to older people and adults with disabilities. Performance varies tremendously across the states with LTSS systems in leading states having markedly different characteristics than those in lagging states. Yet even the top-performing states have some opportunities for improvement.

The Scorecard examines state performance across four key dimensions of LTSS system performance: (1) affordability and access; (2) choice of setting and provider; (3) quality of life and quality of care; and (4) support for family caregivers. It is designed to help states improve the performance of their LTSS systems. It also underscores the need for states to develop better measures of performance over a broader range of services and collect data to more comprehensively assess the adequacy of their LTSS systems.

How does your State fare?

UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES INTRODUCE AMERICA’S SUPERCOMMITTEE

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

UCP Contacts:
Lauren Cozzi, 202-973-7114, lcozzi@ucp.org 
Alicia Kubert Smith, 202-973 7168, akubertsmith@ucp.org

AAPD Contacts:
Lara Schwartz, 202-521-4309, lschwartz@aapd.com
Frankie Mastrangelo, 202-521-4308, fmastrangelo@aapd.com

United Cerebral Palsy and American Association of People with Disabilities Introduce America’s Supercommittee

Engaged Citizens Work to Preserve Medicaid by Sharing Stories,Encouraging Participation

Washington, D.C. – (September 21, 2011) – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) and The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) introduce America’s Supercommittee, a group of six engaged citizens who are lending their voices to the fight to preserve Medicaid. Over the next two months, the United States Congress Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction (the “Supercommittee”), composed of six senators and six members of the U.S. House of Representatives, will deliberate and craft proposals concerning the federal budget. They are likely to recommend trillions of dollars of spending cuts, and could recommend major cuts to Medicaid. UCP, AAPD and the disability community, including our families, friends, and supporters, are engaged in a campaign to preserve Medicaid, which provides millions of Americans with disabilities the tools to remain healthy and participate in our communities.

America’s Supercommittee members will share their perspectives on the importance of Medicaid and personal stories, in an effortto educate the public, the media, and Congress about preserving Medicaid.   The public is encouraged to send questions and also share personalperspectives and stories at the America’s Supercommittee website, http://www.ucp.org/public-policy/america-s-super-committee. The site contains information about how to contact members of Congress, and information about the congressional Super committee’s meetings and deliberations.

The members of America’s Supercommittee are:

  • Robert Coward, Washington, DC: An Air Force veteran and DC native, Robert Coward has advised federal and local officials on accessibility and health care. “Medicaid offers people with disabilities real freedom and choices. The quality health care Medicaid provides allows us to live in our communities and lead independent lives.”
     
  • Richard Donovan, New York, New York: Rich Donovan is Managing Partner and principal owner of IPS, a strategic consultancy that works with business and government to create value in the disability marketplace. Donovan also acts as Chief Investment Officer of WingSail Capital, a new investment management firm that uses a disability lens to find outperformance in global markets. “The world of disability has changed since 1950, and legacy programs like Medicaid must adapt to those changes. Society has an opportunity to use this moment of focus on fiscal sustainability to reshape programs that aren’t delivering on promises to position people with disabilities to deliver the value inherent within them.
     
  • ”David Feinman, Washington, DC: David Feinman is Senior Legislative Associate for The Jewish Federations of North America. He is a member of the Interfaith Disability Advocacy Coalition Steering Committee. “Considering the challenges the “Super Committee” and the rest of the Congress face coming to a consensus on most issues, it is critical that they hear from people who want to have a constructive conversation.”
     
  • Jessica Norwood, Stow, Ohio:  Jessica Norwood is working toward her bachelor’s degree in Political Science at Kent State University. She also works as an office aide at two child development centers. Medicaid provides Jessica with a personal aide who assists her with driving, college work, and tasks at home. She participates in a program that connects parents of people with disabilities and adults who have disabilities. “I want you to understand that including people with disabilities in our communities benefits everyone.  Medicaid helps so many people to live fully in our communities and contribute,” said Norwood.
     
  • German Parodi, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania:  “Without Medicaid, I wouldn’t be able to go to college, work, and be a contributing member of my community. This is about our basic civil rights—the right to be free and to live full lives.”
     
  • Amelia Wallrich, Chicago, Illinois:  Amelia Wallrich attends Northwestern University Law School.Previously, she attended the University of Illinois and completed an internship with Senator Richard Durbin. Wallrich explains, “Our country’s financial stability doesn’t have to be at odds with genuine reform and making people’s lives better.”

“Americans with disabilities and their families are relying on Supercommittee legislators to preserve Medicaid’s vital lifeline which allows eight million people to participate in community life, remain healthy and live to their potential–American values of opportunity, fairness and dignity,” said Stephen Bennett, United Cerebral Palsy President & Chief Executive Officer. “The Supercommittee will compromise American values if it cuts Medicaid’s critical health and long-term care initiatives, upon which those now eligible rely, thus forcing people to leave their homes and live in institutions—at greater expense to taxpayers.”

“We have to let our elected leaders know that we are watching and they are accountable to us,” said AAPD President and CEO Mark Perriello. “The real Americans on America’s Supercommittee are sending a clear message:  our leaders must not erode the opportunities that Medicaid provides millions of Americans with disabilities. Members of Congress are going to hear from thousands more people just like them, and they need to listen,” he added.

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. Together with nearly 100 affiliates, UCP has a mission to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people disabilities by supporting more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. UCP works to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, UCP will continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams, for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.
 
About The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
“The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation’s largest cross-disability organization. We promote equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. Our members, including people with disabilities and our family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change.” Visit www.AAPD.com for more information.

# # #

UCP Fall Forum, A Home for All Americans, Explores Universal Design, Technologies & Building Methods for People with Disabilities & People Hoping to Age in Their Homes

MEDIA ADVISORY:
Request for calendar listing & event coverage

CONTACTS:
Lauren Cozzi: 202-973-7114 (direct), 203-858-5292 (cell), LCozzi@ucp.org
Alicia Kubert Smith: 202-973-7168 (direct), 303-710-5239 (cell), AKubertSmith@ucp.org

UCP FALL FORUM, A HOME FOR ALL AMERICANS, EXPLORES UNIVERSAL DESIGN, TECHNOLOGIES & BUILDING METHODS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES & PEOPLE HOPING TO AGE IN THEIR HOMES

Panel Presentation & Reception at National Association of Home Builders
 
Washington, DC – United Cerebral Palsy (UCP), a leading service provider and advocate for children and adults with a spectrum of disabilities, announces its 2011 Fall Forum, A Home for All Americans, will occur Monday, September 26, 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., at the National Association of Home Builders, 1201 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC.
 
A Home for All Americans will explore universal design, available and emerging technologies, design options and building methods for creating accessible homes and commercial properties for people with disabilities, the aging and all those who hope to age in place in their homes. For those unable to attend, A Home for All Americans will be webcast live starting at 6:30 p.m. ET on ucp.org.
 
Confirmed panelists include:
  • John Allen, Southern Construction and Design
  • Dr. Ronald Cohen, President & CEO, UCP of Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties
  • Mary Ann Greenawalt, former Trustee, United Cerebral Palsy
  • John Salmen, AIA, President, Universal Designers & Consultants, Inc.
  • Dr. Allan “Chip” Teel, Founder, Full Circle America and Elder Power

 

Learn more at ucp.org/fallforum. Panelist bios are available at ucp.org/fallforum/panelist-bios.

WHO:                        Bruce Fried, Co-Chair, UCP Fall Forum, and  Chair, Board of
                                   Trustees & Keith Green, Co-Chair, UCP Fall Forum, and Vice
                                   Chair, Board of Trustees

WHAT:                      UCP’s Fall Forum, A Home for All Americans: Panel
                                   Presentation & Cocktail Reception

WHEN:                     Monday, September 26, 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.  

WHERE:                  National Association of Home Builders
                                1201 15th Street, NW
                                 Washington, DC

                                 LIVE webcast on ucp.org

ADMISSION:          Open to public, with RSVP  

GENERAL RSVP:   rsvp@ucp.org

MEDIA RSVP:        Lauren Cozzi: 202-973-7114 (direct), 203-858-5292 (cell), LCozzi@ucp.org 
                                 
                                 Alicia Kubert Smith: 202-973-7168 (direct), 303-710-5239 (cell), AKubertSmith@ucp.org
                                                                                  
                                 Note: Please contact Lauren & Alicia by cell phone
                                 after 
Thursday, Sept. 23 at 3:00 p.m. ET, as systems may
                                 be affected while UCP moves into its new office.

About United Cerebral Palsy
United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. UCP and its nearly 100 affiliates advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with a spectrum of disabilities by providing services and support to more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. We work to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, we continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org

# # #

ABLE Happy Hour on Wednesday Supports Life Without Limits for People with Disabilities

MEDIA ADVISORY: Request for Coverage & Attendance  

ABLE PROGRAM & EVENT CONTACT:
Michael Piel: 202-973-7110, mpiel@ucp.org

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Lauren Cozzi: 202-973-7114 (direct), LCozzi@ucp.org
Alicia Kubert Smith: 202-973-7168 (direct), AKubertSmith@ucp.org  

ABLE happy hour on Wednesday supports life without limits for people with disabilities  

Raffle Prizes Include an iPad, Nats Tickets & Restaurant Vouchers  

Washington, DC (September 13, 2011) – ABLE, the young professionals network of United Cerebral Palsy (UCP), a leading service provider and advocate for children and adults with a spectrum of disabilities, will host the ABLE Young Professionals Network Inaugural Happy Hour, Wednesday, September 14, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m., Madhatter DC, 1319 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, DC.

  • WHO:       ABLE, the young professionals network of UCP  
  • WHEN:     Wednesday, September 14, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.       
  • WHERE:   Madhatter DC, 1319 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, DC.
  • COST:      $10 donation

 

ABLE is a group of young professionals committed to supporting UCP. Members advance UCP’s mission to create a life without limits for people with a spectrum disabilities, and they find opportunities to increase education and awareness of disability issues. There are no membership fees; and, members are asked to support UCP in the following ways:

  • *volunteering at local affiliates and in the community;
  • *attending social events (happy hours, lecture series, etc.); and
  • *participating in fundraising opportunities.

ABLE offers young professionals in the Washington, DC area a chance to network with others who sharing the same passion, allowing them to become knowledgeable on the issues and gain valuable experience. Learn more at ucp.org/about/able.

About United Cerebral Palsy

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) educates, advocates and provides support services to ensure a life without limits for people with a spectrum of disabilities. UCP and its nearly 100 affiliates advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with a spectrum of disabilities by providing services and support to more than 176,000 children and adults every day—one person at a time, one family at a time. We work to enact real change—to revolutionize care, raise standards of living and create opportunities—impacting the lives of millions living with disabilities. For more than 60 years, UCP has worked to ensure the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in every facet of society. Together, with parents and caregivers, we continue to push for the social, legal and technological changes that increase accessibility and independence, allowing people with disabilities to dream their own dreams for the next 60 years, and beyond. For more information, please visit www.ucp.org.  

 

# # #

Health Disparities Chart Book on Disability and Racial and Ethnic Status in the U.S.

The basic purpose of this chart book is to answer  the question of whether working age (18-64) people with disabilities in the United States  experience health disparities similar to those  experienced by members of racial and ethnic  minority groups in the United States. The report also explores the role of disability in the context of national efforts to address health disparities. Are the socio-economic and health experiences of people with disabilities similar to other recognized minority groups in the United States, such as underserved racial and ethnic groups?  Read more…

Key Findings: The Post-High School Outcomes of Youth with Disabilities up to 6 Years after High School

A new report from the US Department of Education presents key findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). The study helps educators and policy makers develop an understanding of the experiences of secondary school students with disabilities nationally as they go through their early adult years. The report provides data on post secondary education, employment, wages, household circumstances, marital status, community engagement , and more.
 
Transition refers to the time when youth with disabilities leave the school system and continue on to adult life–college, vocational training, employment, and/or independent living. This is a time when many youths "fall through the cracks" and lose services and supports that enable them to lead an independent, productive life. Learn more about this topic on our Transition Page.

Statement of Values: The Supercommittee Must Engage in Debt Reduction—Not Opportunity Reduction

Stephen Bennett and Mark Perriello
Thursday, September 8, 2011

The debt reduction Supercommittee will hold its first meeting on September 8. As they prepare to start their work, Americans of every background and political orientation are looking to these 12 elected representatives to set aside political gamesmanship and produce a plan that reflects both our nation’s urgent needs and its core values. To accomplish this, the Supercommittee must preserve Medicaid, which provides millions of Americans with disabilities the tools to remain healthy and participate in our communities.

Like all Americans, people with disabilities—and our families and supporters—understand that this nation faces tough fiscal choices. Balancing our budget on the backs of Americans who are already living at the margins is not a viable choice. We stand ready to work with the Supercommittee to formulate a plan that reflects our American values of opportunity, fairness, and basic dignity for all.

 We believe:

  • In the deficit-reduction process, we must preserve Medicaid for the people whom it offers a vital lifeline.
     
  • The eight million Americans with disabilities who use Medicaid cannot be forgotten. They are brothers and sisters, neighbors, friends and community volunteers.
     
  • Medicaid provides many Americans the tools they need to participate fully in community life. Without Medicaid, many Americans would be forced to leave their homes and live in institutions—at greater expense to taxpayers.
     
  • Deficit reduction must not result in opportunity reduction for any American: our budget must preserve the critical health and long-term care initiatives that enable eight million persons with disabilities to remain healthy, participate in their communities and live up to their potential.
  • America can and must make good on its promise of opportunity for all. Abandoning people in these difficult economic times is tantamount to abandoning our belief in America’s promise of opportunity.
     
  • We cannot balance the budget on the backs of Americans who are living at the margins already: those now eligible to receive services must not lose the services on which they rely.
     
  • We can balance the budget by being smart and strategic—without denying basic human dignity to the Americans for whom Medicaid is working. We can and must look for cost savings by ensuring that initiatives are operating as efficiently as possible.
     
  • We must make every effort to reduce the costs of Medicaid without compromising the ability of recipients to live full and meaningful lives.
     
  • We must make every effort and maximize all available resources, including new technologies, to reduce the cost of Medicaid without impairing the quality of the services provided.
     
  • Given these important considerations, we are interested in working with policy makers on identifying productive ways to address our nation’s economic rebalancing.

 

We call upon the members of the Supercommittee to reduce our debt without compromising our values, and we welcome the opportunity to work with you on responsible, common-sense responses to our nation’s fiscal challenges.

—————————————————————————————————————

Stephen Bennett is President & CEO of United Cerebral Palsy

Mark Perriello is President & CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities.

—————————————————————————————————————

Visit ucp.org/public-policy/america-s-super-committee for additional information.

Contacts:

Lauren Cozzi, 202-973-7114, LCozzi@ucp.org 
Alicia Kubert Smith, 202-973 7168, akubertsmith@ucp.org